Experimenting with Different Tire Sizes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by SUPER RIDER, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. SUPER RIDER

    SUPER RIDER New Member

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    I have a mountain bike that I use strictly for fitness rides. I have Continental SportContact 26x1.3 slicks on both the front and back wheels, but I also have Specialized Nimbus Armadillo 26x1.5 spares. I am thinking about experimenting with a mix of both tires, and I'll like to know which I should put in the back or the front.

    The Armadillo has a little bit of thread on it, while the Continental is a smooth slick.

    So, which of the two tires would you put in the back and why?

    Please note that the reason for the experiment is all pleasure. I am just interested in maybe making my ride a little bit "fun" or "interesting".

    I ride about 60miles at a time, if that helps.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I would not mix Continental SportContact 26x1.3 slicks with any other tyre. They are from a non cycling background, GP M/cycle.

    I have no idea of the pedigree of the Specialised rubbish, I would not use them for spares.

    Mixing casings is not recomended, Conti Attack/Force, Conti Ultra GatorSkin Grooved/Slick are the only ones I know of where this can be done. Then the difference is just the tread, not the casing, same TPI, same kevlar belt, same compound.
     
  3. Scotty_Dog

    Scotty_Dog New Member

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    I tend to agree with gclark8. But if you're just itching for a tire change experiment, put the Nimbus Armadillo on the front. Because the front wheel controls steering, it might benefit from a wider tire with some tread. Also, the "Armadillo" rating is great protection for the tire that sees the road hazards first - I'd rather blow my rear tire than lose steering control by blowing the front tire. Of course, the extra weight and width of the Nimbus Armadillo will mean slightly lower speeds.

    $0.02 for the sake of science
     
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