fixed wheel chain choice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Alex Graham, Mar 9, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Hi,

    I'm putting together a fixed wheel bike out of an old 'Raleigh Pioneer Classic'. I was given a 52T
    chainset by someone, which was convenient. Now its the exact same one as on my normal bike, which
    uses a 3/32 chain, however ive beed advised to use a 1/8th chain, which is wider. So what I am
    confused about is:

    Can I use this 1/8th chain on my normal (3/32??) chainring?

    And presumably do I need a 1/8th rear sprocket? Does this apply to chainrings too (hence
    question above :)

    Thanks to anyone who can help,

    -Alex

    --
    ----------------------+ Alex Graham | [email protected] | ----------------------+
     
    Tags:


  2. Alex Graham wrote:

    > I'm putting together a fixed wheel bike out of an old 'Raleigh Pioneer Classic'. I was given a 52T
    > chainset by someone, which was convenient.

    Actually, that's not so convenient as you might suppose, because for road-worthy gearing it requires
    a rather large rear sprocket, typically 19 or 20. I generally recommend a 42 or thereabouts for a
    road fixer.

    > its the exact same one as on my normal bike, which uses a 3/32 chain, however ive beed advised to
    > use a 1/8th chain, which is wider.

    That's not the best advice I've ever heard.

    > So what I am confused about is:
    >
    > Can I use this 1/8th chain on my normal (3/32??) chainring?

    Yep.

    > And presumably do I need a 1/8th rear sprocket?

    Nope. 1/8" chain works on either size sprockets, but if both sprockets are 3/32", you'd be better
    off sticking to 3/32" chain.

    For lotsa stuff about fixed-gear bikes, see:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed

    Sheldon "If It Isn't Fixed, It's Broken!" Brown
    +----------------------------------------------------+
    | I admit that reason is a small and feeble flame, | a flickering torch by stumblers carried in the
    | | star-less night, -- blown and flared by passion's | storm, -- and yet, it is the only light. |
    | Extinguish that, and nought remains. | -- Robert Green Ingersoll |
    +----------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  3. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Would you not recommend 1/8 at all then? I was told it was wider and hence 'lasts a bit longer' not
    sure how true that is though.

    The chainring is sort of convenient as I'm a student and hence cheapskate :eek:) I was see it isnt
    ideal though.

    --
    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected] www.westerleycycling.org.uk http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php
    ----------------------------------
     
  4. On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 12:33:48 -0500, Alex Graham wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm putting together a fixed wheel bike out of an old 'Raleigh Pioneer Classic'. I was given a 52T
    > chainset by someone, which was convenient. Now its the exact same one as on my normal bike, which
    > uses a 3/32 chain, however ive beed advised to use a 1/8th chain, which is wider. So what I am
    > confused about is:
    >
    > Can I use this 1/8th chain on my normal (3/32??) chainring?
    >
    > And presumably do I need a 1/8th rear sprocket? Does this apply to chainrings too (hence question
    > above :)

    If you use a 1/8" wide sprocket, you will need 1/8" chain. This is what I do, since I have lots of
    sprockets collected since the 70s. But there are plenty of 3/23" sprockets sold. Get them, and you
    can use a 3/32" chain (8-speed, 9-speed, it doesn't matter).

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored _`\(,_ | by little
    statesmen and philosophers and divines." --Ralph Waldo (_)/ (_) | Emerson
     
  5. On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 17:13:38 -0500, Alex Graham wrote:

    > Would you not recommend 1/8 at all then? I was told it was wider and hence 'lasts a bit longer'
    > not sure how true that is though.

    Poppycock. A fixed-gear chain will outlast a derailleur chain by a fair amount, but not because of
    its width. The difference is that the fixed gear always has a good chainline, while a derailleur
    bike typically runs with a bad chainline. The 1/8" width will not significantly contribute to longer
    chain life. Chains wear out due to friction against all the pins and plates. Wider pins have more
    area to wear, but proportionally more grit in there wearing it away, also.
    >
    > The chainring is sort of convenient as I'm a student and hence cheapskate :eek:) I was see it isnt
    > ideal though.

    I'd say that the 52 is a bit big, but if you can find a good size cog to go with it, then it should
    be fine. Larger cogs/chainrings do last longer, for a number of reasons.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | When you are up to your ass in alligators, it's hard to remember _`\(,_ | that your initial
    objective was to drain the swamp. -- LBJ (_)/ (_) |
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Alex Graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm putting together a fixed wheel bike out of an old 'Raleigh Pioneer Classic'. I was given a 52T
    > chainset by someone, which was convenient. Now its the exact same one as on my normal bike, which
    > uses a 3/32 chain, however ive beed advised to use a 1/8th chain, which is wider. So what I am
    > confused about is:
    >
    > Can I use this 1/8th chain on my normal (3/32??) chainring?
    >
    > And presumably do I need a 1/8th rear sprocket? Does this apply to chainrings too (hence question
    > above :)

    BMX 1/8" chains are cheap and may be run on 3/32 or 1/8 teeth or a combination of them. Since many
    of us relegate our fixed bikes to poor weather this allows more frequent (less expensive) chain
    replacement.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. I have a british 1930 era flip flop track hub. It takes standard cogs, but the lock ring is not
    standard threaded. I have one old lock ring that I use for the big cog. I don't have one for the
    little cog on the other side. (I probably won't use that little cog, I'm not man enough ha ha). Is
    there a source for odd track lock rings?
    --
    Bill "Pop Pop" Patterson Retired and riding my Linear, my front drive low racer our M5 tandem and my
    old Schwinn Paramount.

    See some Bikes At:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~wm.patterson/index.html

    Reply to [email protected]
     
  8. alex-<< I'm putting together a fixed wheel bike out of an old 'Raleigh Pioneer Classic'. I was given
    a 52T chainset by someone, which was convenient. Now its the exact same one as on my normal bike,
    which uses a 3/32 chain, however ive beed advised to use a 1/8th chain, which is wider. So what I am
    confused about is:

    No need to use a track chain(1/8") altho it'll work.


    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. Mikeyankee

    Mikeyankee Guest

    I put an old 1/8" chain on my fixie (with 3/32" chainring & sprocket) when I first built it up,
    since I needed a chain and had a shortish 1/8" lying around.

    It worked OK, but after several rides I replaced it with a 3/32" chain and the drive train became
    smoother and quieter.

    Chain wear is negligible because the chainline is straight. I must have ~3k miles on the current
    chain (Sedis PCS-68) with hardly any "stretch".

    Gearing-wise, I use 42/16 which is about average for flat to rolling terrain.

    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...