Food Slicers - was: Christmas on New Year's Day

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Boron Elgar, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    So far in the previous thread, two mentions were made of food slicers.
    I am looking for one for home use. I do want electric, and ease of
    cleaning would be appreciated. Storage is not a problem.

    I had my eye on this one, but really do not know the category at all.

    http://tinyurl.com/bgco4

    Boron
     
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  2. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

  3. Boron Elgar wrote:
    > So far in the previous thread, two mentions were made of food slicers.
    > I am looking for one for home use. I do want electric, and ease of
    > cleaning would be appreciated.
    >
    > Boron



    What model Rival did you have? I've been looking at them and want to
    know which one you had that was so hard to clean?
     
  4. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On 1 Jan 2006 09:09:13 -0800, "itsjoannotjoann"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Boron Elgar wrote:
    >> So far in the previous thread, two mentions were made of food slicers.
    >> I am looking for one for home use. I do want electric, and ease of
    >> cleaning would be appreciated.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >
    >What model Rival did you have? I've been looking at them and want to
    >know which one you had that was so hard to clean?



    Someone else mentioned the Rival, Biig - Sharon, I believe.

    Boron
     
  5. Boron Elgar wrote:
    > Someone else mentioned the Rival, Biig - Sharon, I believe.
    >
    > Boron



    OOPS!
     
  6. biig

    biig Guest

    itsjoannotjoann wrote:
    >
    > Boron Elgar wrote:
    > > So far in the previous thread, two mentions were made of food slicers.
    > > I am looking for one for home use. I do want electric, and ease of
    > > cleaning would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > Boron

    >
    > What model Rival did you have? I've been looking at them and want to
    > know which one you had that was so hard to clean?


    I don't know the model number. We bought it at a flea market in
    Florida and I never checked. It looked brand new, but had no
    instructions with it. I googled and couldn't find the same one, so I'm
    guessing that it's an older model. Probably the people who originally
    bought it didn't use it either. .........Sharon
     
  7. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Boron Elgar wrote:

    > So far in the previous thread, two mentions were made of food slicers.
    > I am looking for one for home use. I do want electric, and ease of
    > cleaning would be appreciated. Storage is not a problem.
    >
    > I had my eye on this one, but really do not know the category at all.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/bgco4
    >
    > Boron


    Product: Waring Pro FS150 Food Slicer
    Cost : Just under $100
    URL : http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000ALQ8D/102-8284641-0858534?v=glance

    The unit looks and operates like a miniature version of a commercial
    deli-style slicer. It has the same geometry and basic components.
    Since (over) using this one it has since been replaced it with a
    commercial hobart slicer, about $500 USD used.

    Here's a list of the Waring's good and bad points.

    Good points
    ===========

    - It works well enough, considering

    The slice thickness is adjustable from 1/32 to 1/2 inch (the specs say
    9/10 inch maximum but after measuring I believe that's incorrect)
    With a little practice it produces slices thin enough to read a
    newspaper through. This is partly due to the very solid thickness
    adjustment mechanism. That part is all metal and well designed so the
    feeder mechanism doesn't shift at all when slicing.

    - It has a fairly small footprint

    Dimension: 17-1/4 x 10-13/16 x 11-1/4
    Weight: 15.15 lbs

    - It's easy to clean

    I've seen reviews complaining about the fact that it's hard
    to clean. Whoever wrote that review has never used a commercial
    meat slicer. This is much easier to clean by comparison.

    - It's cheap

    At under $100 it's the cheapest deli-type slicer I could find

    Bad points
    ==========

    - It's under powered

    The 130 watt motor is single speed and rotates at a fairly low
    RPM. Very dense material will slow the blade rotation to a crawl.
    The specs recommend a maximum of 10 minutes usage at a time, but
    I found that this is not a hard and fast rule. It depends on what
    what you're slicing. It will slice enough meat for several
    party trays at once with no problem. I've never had any overheating
    of the motor, but I can easily see it happening with heavy enough
    use.

    - It's part plastic

    The feeder assembly is almost all plastic. That doesn't present a
    big problem when slicing things because it's quite sturdy, but
    it does limit it's durability. Don't drop it, for instance.

    - It doesn't handle large pieces

    Given the fact that the blade has 6 inches of exposed surface
    and the feeder assembly has 7 inches of travel, the largest
    piece you can cut is around 6 inches in diameter. I get around this
    by cutting the meat into smaller pieces where necessary. In other
    situations this could be a real limitation, like with very large
    blocks of cheese.

    - It takes some getting used to

    Because of it's construction and lack of power it's not as easy
    and idiot proof as a commercial slicer. However, if you have any knife
    skills at all you'll find yourself to producing good results
    right away.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
  8. "Reg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > - It's part plastic
    >
    > The feeder assembly is almost all plastic. That doesn't present a
    > big problem when slicing things because it's quite sturdy, but
    > it does limit it's durability. Don't drop it, for instance.


    Depends on the plastic. A good chunk of your car is plastic and it is on the
    road a high speed with no damage. There are many varieties and formulations
    of plastic. Just like the windows in an airplane at 500 mph.
     
  9. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    > "Reg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>- It's part plastic
    >>
    >>The feeder assembly is almost all plastic. That doesn't present a
    >>big problem when slicing things because it's quite sturdy, but
    >>it does limit it's durability. Don't drop it, for instance.

    >
    >
    > Depends on the plastic. A good chunk of your car is plastic and it is on the
    > road a high speed with no damage. There are many varieties and formulations
    > of plastic. Just like the windows in an airplane at 500 mph.


    I wasn't describing a car or an airplane. I'm referring
    specifically to the FS150 Food Slicer, which is on
    the absolute low end of the scale when it comes to
    durability. That's why I replaced it with an all metal
    one.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     

  10. >> "Reg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >>>- It's part plastic
    >>>
    >>>The feeder assembly is almost all plastic. That doesn't present a
    >>>big problem when slicing things because it's quite sturdy, but
    >>>it does limit it's durability. Don't drop it, for instance.



    > I wasn't describing a car or an airplane. I'm referring
    > specifically to the FS150 Food Slicer, which is on
    > the absolute low end of the scale when it comes to
    > durability. That's why I replaced it with an all metal
    > one.
    >


    Perhaps it is low end, but you incriminated plastics as being part of the
    problem and that it may break if dropped. Unless you know the specifics of
    the plastic used, you cannot make that statement. Some plastics are quite
    durable and can take high impact, unscathed, versus bend or cracked cheap
    metals. It may, in fact, be increasing its durability.
     
  11. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

    > Perhaps it is low end, but you incriminated plastics as being part of the
    > problem and that it may break if dropped. Unless you know the specifics of
    > the plastic used, you cannot make that statement. Some plastics are quite
    > durable and can take high impact, unscathed, versus bend or cracked cheap
    > metals. It may, in fact, be increasing its durability.



    Well sure, the fact that the plastic unit had to be replaced
    with a metal one does incriminate plastic in this case. I'll
    buy that :)

    And yes, some plastics can be durable. Just not in this case.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
  12. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:18:06 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Product: Waring Pro FS150 Food Slicer
    >Cost : Just under $100
    >URL : http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000ALQ8D/102-8284641-0858534?v=glance
    >
    >The unit looks and operates like a miniature version of a commercial
    >deli-style slicer. It has the same geometry and basic components.
    >Since (over) using this one it has since been replaced it with a
    >commercial hobart slicer, about $500 USD used.
    >
    >Here's a list of the Waring's good and bad points.
    >
    >Good points
    >===========
    >
    >- It works well enough, considering
    >
    >The slice thickness is adjustable from 1/32 to 1/2 inch (the specs say
    >9/10 inch maximum but after measuring I believe that's incorrect)
    >With a little practice it produces slices thin enough to read a
    >newspaper through. This is partly due to the very solid thickness
    >adjustment mechanism. That part is all metal and well designed so the
    >feeder mechanism doesn't shift at all when slicing.
    >
    >- It has a fairly small footprint
    >
    >Dimension: 17-1/4 x 10-13/16 x 11-1/4
    >Weight: 15.15 lbs
    >
    >- It's easy to clean
    >
    >I've seen reviews complaining about the fact that it's hard
    >to clean. Whoever wrote that review has never used a commercial
    >meat slicer. This is much easier to clean by comparison.


    What's involved in cleaning it? How long does it take? Can any parts
    go into the dishwasher?

    TIA.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  13. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Curly Sue wrote:

    > On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:18:06 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Product: Waring Pro FS150 Food Slicer
    >>Cost : Just under $100
    >>URL : http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000ALQ8D/102-8284641-0858534?v=glance
    >>

    >
    > What's involved in cleaning it? How long does it take? Can any parts
    > go into the dishwasher?


    Here's what I do. Remove the guides and either clean by hand
    or in the dishwasher. Sponge down the outside of the slicer.
    Remove the blade and wash it. Pick out any food particles
    from the bottom area with a skewer. Reattach blade.
    Total time 3 - 5 minutes.

    The only part that might slow you down is getting the blade
    on and off. You can use a large coin to screw/unscrew
    it but I found a large screwdriver works best.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
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