freehub protector help

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Ian, May 26, 2003.

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  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    hello, i am pretty new to mtb and practically a virgin to repair. after my last ride, i noticed
    while coasting, i hear this god awful clunking sound on my back wheel. after viewing the problem,
    this circular clear plastic thing (freehub protector?) is all out of whack. it is not concentrically
    aligned with the freewheel nor does it maintain a constant gap between itself and the gears. can i
    tear this piece off? what all does it do? i'd hate to have to take my bike in and pay to have
    somebody look at this (couldn't find any information on the web either) thanks for any advice in
    advance. ian
     
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  2. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > hello, i am pretty new to mtb and practically a virgin to repair. after my last ride, i noticed
    > while coasting, i hear this god awful clunking sound on my back wheel. after viewing the problem,
    > this circular clear plastic thing (freehub protector?) is all out of whack. it is not
    > concentrically
    aligned
    > with the freewheel nor does it maintain a constant gap between itself and the gears. can i tear
    > this piece off? what all does it do? i'd hate to have to take my bike in and pay to have somebody
    > look at this (couldn't
    find
    > any information on the web either) thanks for any advice in advance.

    Whatcha got there is a "spoke protector", and yes you can remove it. (Remove all reflectors while
    you're at it, too, UNLESS you ride on roads at night often.)

    Bill "I guarantee ya his chain falls into spokes now" S.
     
  3. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > hello, i am pretty new to mtb and practically a virgin to repair. after my last ride, i noticed
    > > while coasting, i hear this god awful clunking sound on my back wheel. after viewing the
    > > problem, this circular clear plastic thing (freehub protector?) is all out of whack. it is not
    > > concentrically
    > aligned
    > > with the freewheel nor does it maintain a constant gap between itself and the gears. can i tear
    > > this piece off? what all does it do? i'd hate to have to take my bike in and pay to have
    > > somebody look at this (couldn't
    > find
    > > any information on the web either) thanks for any advice in advance.
    >
    > Whatcha got there is a "spoke protector", and yes you can remove it. (Remove all reflectors while
    > you're at it, too, UNLESS you ride on roads at night often.)
    >
    > Bill "I guarantee ya his chain falls into spokes now" S.
    >
    >
    >

    a properly dialed derailer needs no spoke protector. i ripped mine off when i first got the
    [original] bike. i have yet to get a chain caught in the gap, so i see no real reason for it.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  4. Ian

    Ian Guest

    thanks again for your help guys....appears i hit another snag however......guess i need a freehub
    removal wrench....dammit......maybe i'll take the bike in afterall "Stephen Baker"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Travis says:
    >
    > >a properly dialed derailer needs no spoke protector. i ripped mine off when i first got the
    > >[original] bike. i have yet to get a chain caught in the gap, so i see no real reason for it.
    >
    > Karma.
     
  5. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > thanks again for your help guys....appears i hit another snag however......guess i need a freehub
    > removal wrench....dammit......maybe
    i'll
    > take the bike in afterall

    Wait a second, top-poster----- er, grasshopper. Is this a BIG clear plastic thing (larger than
    your granny gear)? Or is it a SMALLISH plastic thing that's sort of "inside" the cassette? If it's
    the big one, you should be able to use a screwdriver to break its attachment to spokes. Not sure
    about smaller type, however. (And you'll need a chain whip if job indeed requires a cassette
    removal tool.)

    Bill "has suffered 'rear wheel chain suck' numerous times, and never broken a spoke...well,
    immediately at least" S.
     
  6. Chris Snell

    Chris Snell Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > thanks again for your help guys....appears i hit another snag however......guess i need a
    > freehub removal
    wrench....dammit......maybe i'll
    > take the bike in afterall

    If this is related to another problem, sure, but if it's for the spoke protector the dang thing is
    already broken (non-concentric with hub and flopping around) so you could just break it in enough
    pieces to extract it without removing the cassette.

    Those plastic one always seem useless to me anyways, break to easily.

    - Chris.
     
  7. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > thanks again for your help guys....appears i hit another snag however......guess i need a
    > > freehub removal wrench....dammit......maybe
    > i'll
    > > take the bike in afterall
    >
    > Wait a second, top-poster----- er, grasshopper. Is this a BIG clear plastic thing (larger than
    > your granny gear)? Or is it a SMALLISH plastic thing that's sort of "inside" the cassette? If it's
    > the big one, you should be able to use a screwdriver to break its attachment to spokes. Not sure
    > about smaller type, however. (And you'll need a chain whip if job indeed requires a cassette
    > removal tool.)
    >
    > Bill "has suffered 'rear wheel chain suck' numerous times, and never broken a spoke...well,
    > immediately at least" S.
    >
    >
    >

    note use of freehub, not cassette. could be threaded 7 speed.

    if so, my LBS showed me that just getting the tool set in the splines, attaching a breaker bar, hold
    the wheel real goon and kick the bar to free up the freehub. they tried vises, but this works best,
    and works as a stress remover (especially when i bring in my wheel, freehub is usually locked with
    several hundred foot pounds from my meager weight and leg strength).
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  8. Ian

    Ian Guest

    it was definitely the protector......notice the past tense........burnt that

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > thanks again for your help guys....appears i hit another snag however......guess i need a
    > > > freehub removal
    wrench....dammit......maybe
    > > i'll
    > > > take the bike in afterall
    > >
    > > Wait a second, top-poster----- er, grasshopper. Is this a BIG clear
    plastic
    > > thing (larger than your granny gear)? Or is it a SMALLISH plastic thing that's sort of "inside"
    > > the cassette? If it's the big one, you should
    be
    > > able to use a screwdriver to break its attachment to spokes. Not sure
    about
    > > smaller type, however. (And you'll need a chain whip if job indeed
    requires
    > > a cassette removal tool.)
    > >
    > > Bill "has suffered 'rear wheel chain suck' numerous times, and never
    broken
    > > a spoke...well, immediately at least" S.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > note use of freehub, not cassette. could be threaded 7 speed.
    >
    > if so, my LBS showed me that just getting the tool set in the splines, attaching a breaker bar,
    > hold the wheel real goon and kick the bar to free up the freehub. they tried vises, but this works
    > best, and works as a stress remover (especially when i bring in my wheel, freehub is usually
    > locked with several hundred foot pounds from my meager weight and leg strength).
    > --
    > ~Travis
    >
    > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  9. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > it was definitely the protector......notice the past tense........burnt
    that

    Dayum! Sure you're not related to Shaun aRe?! Hehehe...just be sure your low limit screw is properly
    set to keep from shifting into the spokes. A broken protector is a sign that the chain jumped in
    there at least once. Kinda like a blown fuse.

    Mike
     
  10. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > it was definitely the protector......notice the past tense........burnt
    > that

    >
    >
    > Dayum! Sure you're not related to Shaun aRe?!

    > Hehehe...just be sure your low limit screw is properly set to keep from shifting into the
    > spokes. A broken protector is a sign that the chain jumped in there at least once. Kinda like a
    > blown fuse.

    I have blown several fuses, and my chain 'jumped in there' several times too, so, I must concur with
    your assertion there Mr. Dart.

    Shaun aRe
     
  11. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > it was definitely the protector......notice the past
    tense........burnt
    > > that

    > >
    > >
    > > Dayum! Sure you're not related to Shaun aRe?!
    >

    >
    > > Hehehe...just be sure your low limit screw is properly set to keep from shifting into the
    > > spokes.
    A
    > > broken protector is a sign that the chain jumped in there at least once. Kinda like a
    > > blown fuse.
    >
    > I have blown several fuses, and my chain 'jumped in there' several times too, so, I must concur
    > with your assertion there Mr. Dart.
    >
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >

    Well thank you Mr. aRe.
     
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