Gentle education works

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Nick Kew, Jun 19, 2003.

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  1. Nick Kew

    Nick Kew Guest

    Was cycling in urban traffic today, when a black mercedes passing too close forced me to go straight
    over a pothole.

    At the next trafficlights, I gave a polite tap on the window, and asked that he should leave more
    space when passing, as he had just forced me over a pothole.

    After the lights changed, he passed me again, with a much bigger clearance. With a bit of luck,
    he'll be aware of the issue in future. One motorist educated, with no aggro or ill-will.

    --
    Axis of Evil: Whose economy needs ever more wars? Arms Exports $bn: USA 14.2, UK 5.1, vs France 1.5,
    Germany 0.8 (The Economist, July 2002)
     
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  2. Al_mossah

    Al_mossah Guest

    "Nick Kew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > Was cycling in urban traffic today, when a black mercedes passing too close forced me to go
    > straight over a pothole.
    >
    > At the next trafficlights, I gave a polite tap on the window, and asked that he should leave more
    > space when passing, as he had just forced me over a pothole.
    >
    > After the lights changed, he passed me again, with a much bigger clearance. With a bit of luck,
    > he'll be aware of the issue in future. One motorist educated, with no aggro or ill-will.
    >
    > --
    > Axis of Evil: Whose economy needs ever more wars? Arms Exports $bn: USA 14.2, UK 5.1, vs France
    > 1.5, Germany 0.8 (The Economist, July 2002)

    Nice to hear. I was on my way back from a ride, pretty knackered, came to a T-junction where I
    wanted to turn left. There was a car coming down the road to my right, so my attempt to turn into
    the road without losing precious momentum was abandoned, and I braked to a halt.

    10m from the junction, motorist slows, then starts to turn left into my road. I could have gone
    after all if the moron had only indicated. I held my arms out, indicating bafflement as to his
    intentions, whilst asking "if you ********* indicated we might all get on". He stopped, opened his
    window and apologised. Smiles all round.

    Cycling up the inside of line of stationary traffic on way to station, my flapping coat rapped on a
    wing mirror. My fault. Stopped bike, went back to car and apologised. Apology accepted with smile.
    Still caught train. There's room for us all on these roads with a little courtesy.

    Peter.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > Nice to hear. I was on my way back from a ride, pretty knackered, came to a T-junction where I
    > wanted to turn left. There was a car coming down the road to my right, so my attempt to turn into
    > the road without losing precious momentum was abandoned, and I braked to a halt.
    >
    > 10m from the junction, motorist slows, then starts to turn left into my road. I could have gone
    > after all if the moron had only indicated.

    Would you have turned left in front of him if he had been indicating? I would still have hesitated,
    I've been in more than one situation where the indication has been plain incorrect.

    Colin
     
  4. I tried to educate gently a pillock in a Mercedes on Wednesday, but he decline to open the window on
    which I was tapping in an attempt to inform him that:

    1. the road down which we were both travelling was a one-way street, and
    2. one of us was going the wrong way, and
    3. it wasn't me.

    He probably went home and wrote a letter to the "Daily Mail" about lycra louts.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 08:49:29 +0000 (UTC), "al_Mossah"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >10m from the junction, motorist slows, then starts to turn left into my road. I could have gone
    >after all if the moron had only indicated.

    A lesson my driving instructor taught me and which I apply on the bike and in the car: never believe
    a car's indocators. Wait until you see them start to turn, or until they are going slowly enough
    that it would be safe to go even if they were not indicating. They might be about to turn into their
    drive just past the junction, after all.

    Sorry, that really is very sanctimonious but it's also true. I am confident that it has saved me
    from at least one serious prang.

    Guy
    ===
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  6. Henry Braun

    Henry Braun Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003, Dave Larrington wrote:
    > I tried to educate gently a pillock in a Mercedes on Wednesday, but he decline to open the window
    > on which I was tapping in an attempt to inform him that:
    >
    > 1. the road down which we were both travelling was a one-way street, and
    > 2. one of us was going the wrong way, and
    > 3. it wasn't me.

    Turl St in Oxford gives good opportunities for this, being exactly one white-vanswidth at the end
    which motor vehicles are not allowed to enter. No need to tap on a window when you can block their
    path entirely---I find that a slightly confused expression of infinite patience works best.
     
  7. Henry Braun wrote:

    > Turl St in Oxford gives good opportunities for this, being exactly one white-vanswidth at the end
    > which motor vehicles are not allowed to enter. No need to tap on a window when you can block their
    > path entirely---I find that a slightly confused expression of infinite patience works best.

    Alas, Park Street SE1 is just a whisker too wide for this chiz.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  8. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 11:36:02 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 08:49:29 +0000 (UTC), "al_Mossah"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>10m from the junction, motorist slows, then starts to turn left into my road. I could have gone
    >>after all if the moron had only indicated.
    >
    >A lesson my driving instructor taught me and which I apply on the bike and in the car: never
    >believe a car's indocators.

    I remember the very same thing - never anticipate on an indicator signal.

    Somehing else I remember was failing my driving test first time round: waving a ped across a
    light-controlled zebra crossing. This chap stepped up, lights turned amber, and being such a
    considerate motorist, I waved him across - setting up a hazzard. Yeah, right. Bad news. It's failure
    for you my boy.

    The moral of the failure was: proceed when you have the right of way, stop when you don't.

    Garry
     
  9. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 01:00:24 +0100, [email protected]hing.com (Nick Kew) wrote:

    >Was cycling in urban traffic today, when a black mercedes passing too close forced me to go
    >straight over a pothole.
    >
    >At the next trafficlights, I gave a polite tap on the window, and asked that he should leave more
    >space when passing, as he had just forced me over a pothole.
    >
    >After the lights changed, he passed me again, with a much bigger clearance. With a bit of luck,
    >he'll be aware of the issue in future. One motorist educated, with no aggro or ill-will.

    You did good, and took a risk in the process too. You could very easily have been hurled a sack load
    of abuse. I've often stayed away form these kind of situations for fear of setting up conflict, but
    that's it....me just assuming it *will* be conflict.

    Good for you.

    Garry
     
  10. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Nick Kew deftly scribbled:

    > Was cycling in urban traffic today, when a black mercedes passing too close forced me to go
    > straight over a pothole.
    >
    > At the next trafficlights, I gave a polite tap on the window, and asked that he should leave more
    > space when passing, as he had just forced me over a pothole.
    >
    > After the lights changed, he passed me again, with a much bigger clearance. With a bit of luck,
    > he'll be aware of the issue in future. One motorist educated, with no aggro or ill-will.

    Nice one .. ;)

    Bit of a reverse of a similar situation .. I was driving in the car with a cyclist way ahead of me,
    decent hand signal showing he's about to turn left .. I was overtaken by another car. The cyclist
    proceeds to swing very wide out right before turning left, in the process making the car that had
    overtaken me and had now caught up with him, swerve quite violently to avoid him. By now there was
    also on-coming traffic. I also turned left, following the cyclist who appeared ablivious to what
    he'd done. When we both stopped at Tee-Junction I wound window down and had a word. (I had mountain
    bikes on roof, so it was reasonably obvious I was a cyclist too)

    He said he'd done it so that he didn't have to slow down to get round the corner, but no, he
    hadn't looked back and no he didn't realise he'd made a car swerve, he hadn't even seen a car
    behind him .. ;)

    No worries, no-one actually hurt, but it _is_ actions like this that can make one road-user question
    other road-users in general .. I have no clue as to what the swerving motorist thought .. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  11. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Not me, someone else deftly scribbled:

    > ablivious to what he'd done. When we both stopped at Tee-Junction I
    ^^^^^^^^^ oblivious

    --
    Digweed
     
  12. W K

    W K Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I tried to educate gently a pillock in a Mercedes on Wednesday, but he decline to open the window
    > on which I was tapping in an attempt to inform him that:
    >
    > 1. the road down which we were both travelling was a one-way street, and
    > 2. one of us was going the wrong way, and
    > 3. it wasn't me.

    We have a one-way only, pedestrianised town centre street, with gates that are often shut. OK, its
    naughty to go through it when its "loading only" time at 7:30 am, but quite often cars are coming up
    the other way. I often hold my position, the middle of the road, until much later than they'd expect
     
  13. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003, Garry Broad <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Somehing else I remember was failing my driving test first time round: waving a ped across a
    > light-controlled zebra crossing. This chap stepped up, lights turned amber, and being such a
    > considerate motorist, I waved him across - setting up a hazzard. Yeah, right. Bad news. It's
    > failure for you my boy.
    >
    > The moral of the failure was: proceed when you have the right of way, stop when you don't.

    Actually, I think you don't have right of way on _any_ pedestrian crossing - the pedestrian does,
    irrespective of the state of teh lights. Most people know it's true of zebras, but I think you have
    to rummage pretty deep in the regulations to determine that it's true of pelicans.

    Then again, I've never seen a light controlled zebra, so maybe you're somewhere odd (ie, not
    England) and the rules are different.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  14. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Nick Kew <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > Was cycling in urban traffic today,

    <snip>

    And someone in an escort pulled into my lane without a signal and I suspect without looking. Sadly
    I was too furious and shocked to gently educate him, called him a tw*t and made a certain anglo
    saxon gesture.

    Funnily enough, by the next junction he gave me a wide berth too.

    First near miss in ages.

    --
    Andrew

    "Look laddie, if you're in the penalty area and aren't quite sure what to do with the ball, just
    stick it in the net and we'll discuss all your options afterwards."
     
  15. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 18:23:41 +0000 (UTC), Ian Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Jun 2003, Garry Broad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Somehing else I remember was failing my driving test first time round: waving a ped across a
    >> light-controlled zebra crossing. This chap stepped up, lights turned amber, and being such a
    >> considerate motorist, I waved him across - setting up a hazzard. Yeah, right. Bad news. It's
    >> failure for you my boy.
    >>
    >> The moral of the failure was: proceed when you have the right of way, stop when you don't.
    >
    >Actually, I think you don't have right of way on _any_ pedestrian crossing - the pedestrian does,
    >irrespective of the state of teh lights. Most people know it's true of zebras, but I think you have
    >to rummage pretty deep in the regulations to determine that it's true of pelicans.
    >
    >Then again, I've never seen a light controlled zebra, so maybe you're somewhere odd (ie, not
    >England) and the rules are different.
    >

    No, this is England. And from what I can contrue, I think you'll find that the 'status' of a
    crossing is controlled by what the lights are doing. Pelican crossing without lights are always
    priority to the pedestrian. Anyway, he failed me on it. He may have been wrong, but I don't think
    so. The only thing I did wrong, but fair play to the bloke, it was lesson well learnt, and I've
    remembered that many, many times. If in doubt, and the 'right of way is yours' - use it, don't set
    up a hazzard to other road uses, by being generous, especially if other road users then have to
    'guess' what's going on. If they have to wait, so be it, they wait.

    Garry
     
  16. Henry Braun <[email protected]> wrote: ( > I tried to educate gently a pillock in a Mercedes on
    Wednesday, but he ) > decline to open the window on which I was tapping in an attempt to inform ( >
    him that: ) > ( > 1. the road down which we were both travelling was a one-way street, and ) > 2.
    one of us was going the wrong way, and ( > 3. it wasn't me. ) ( Turl St in Oxford gives good
    opportunities for this, being exactly one ) white-vanswidth at the end which motor vehicles are not
    allowed to enter.

    Of course, the Turl is complicated by no longer being one-way along any part of its length. There
    are drivers who remember one of the four different schemes -- including one-way traffic with and
    without a contra-flow cycle lane that have operated over the past quarter of a century -- but even
    putting those aside you can understand that some less astute mobile death greenhouse pilots might be
    confused by the concept of a street on which they are permitted to travel in both directions, but
    not to enter from one end.

    And then there is the part-time one-way traffic sign in Market Street, which leads to the "no
    vehicles" restriction at Cornmarket...

    ( No need to tap on a window when you can block their path entirely---I ) find that a slightly
    confused expression of infinite patience works best.

    When I'm waiting at a red light at the top of Parks Road and someone confused by the road layout
    starts to turn right into the wrong side of the road -- as happens from time to time -- I find that
    an involuntary expression of panic and furious waving of the arms is moderately effective.
     
  17. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    In news:[email protected], Garry Broad <[email protected]> typed:
    >. If in doubt, and the 'right of way is yours' - use it, don't set up a hazzard to other road uses,
    > by being generous, especially if other road users then have to 'guess' what's going on. If they
    > have to wait, so be it, they wait.

    If I recall correctly that was part of the issue (discussed here last week) wrt the lunatic driver
    who killed the cyclist where the white(?) van driver had stopped and conceded right of way to the
    cyclist crossing the road, was overtaken at speed by the lunatic killing the cyclist.

    pk
     
  18. Henry Braun

    Henry Braun Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003, Geraint Jones wrote:

    > When I'm waiting at a red light at the top of Parks Road and someone confused by the road layout
    > starts to turn right into the wrong side of the road -- as happens from time to time -- I find
    > that an involuntary expression of panic and furious waving of the arms is moderately effective.

    A repeatedly observed behaviour of cyclists at those lights is to turn left into Parks Rd by
    mounting onto the pavement at the pedestrian crossing on the Banbury Rd, and dropping back onto the
    road ten yards later on Parks Rd. It seems to be a deprecatory genuflection in apology at running
    the red light, which they have of course just done.
     
  19. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 01:05:43 +0100, Garry Broad <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If in doubt, and the 'right of way is yours' - use it, don't set up a hazzard to other road uses,
    >by being generous,

    Nothing wrong with stopping, it's giving signals to other road users (ped or vehicular) which is the
    issue IMO. If I am in a position where one might just as erasily stop as go I will often stop and
    let someone cross, but I let them make up their mind if they want to.

    Guy
    ===
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  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 06:45:01 +0000 (UTC), "Paul Kelly"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If I recall correctly that was part of the issue (discussed here last week) wrt the lunatic driver
    >who killed the cyclist where the white(?) van driver had stopped and conceded right of way to the
    >cyclist crossing the road, was overtaken at speed by the lunatic killing the cyclist.

    The lunatic was travelling at twice the limit and overtaking when he couldn't see ahead.

    Guy
    ===
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    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
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