Greased chain for rain?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Carr, Jun 23, 2003.

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  1. Dave Carr

    Dave Carr Guest

    Noted in Velonews report from the USPS mechanic at Wachovia:

    "[We gave the bikes]all a quick wash to get most of the road grime off the frames but had to scrub
    hard to get the grease we applied to the chains for the rain in Lancaster. "

    Grease on the chain: typical for rain? What other techniques are recommended?

    DC
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >Noted in Velonews report from the USPS mechanic at Wachovia: "[We gave the bikes]all a quick wash
    >to get most of the road grime off the frames but had to scrub hard to get the grease we applied to
    >the chains for the rain in Lancaster. " Grease on the chain: typical for rain? What other
    >techniques are recommended?

    What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    serves to attract dirt.

    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  3. Jim Edgar

    Jim Edgar Guest

    Alex Rodriguez at [email protected] wrote on 6/23/03 2:09 PM:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Noted in Velonews report from the USPS mechanic at Wachovia: "[We gave the bikes]all a quick wash
    >> to get most of the road grime off the frames but had to scrub hard to get the grease we applied
    >> to the chains for the rain in Lancaster. " Grease on the chain: typical for rain? What other
    >> techniques are recommended?
    >
    > What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    > serves to attract dirt.

    During el Nino here in nor-Cal, when pretty much everything washed out pretty quickly under the
    deluge on rides over an hour or two, we used a wet chain lube as normal, and then put Judy Butter (a
    relatively light grease) lightly over the top, which did seem to prevent it getting sluiced out as
    quickly. It was more as a protective layer than as the only lube. Worked. Messy. But, worked.

    -- Jim
     
  4. On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 17:09:49 -0400, Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    >serves to attract dirt.

    Can't you apply it like wax, ie, melted? I've never actually tried melting grease, though. Maybe it
    doesn't melt at useful temperatures.

    Jasper
     
  5. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Jim Edgar wrote:
    > Alex Rodriguez at [email protected] wrote on 6/23/03 2:09 PM:
    >
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >>>Noted in Velonews report from the USPS mechanic at Wachovia: "[We gave the bikes]all a quick wash
    >>>to get most of the road grime off the frames but had to scrub hard to get the grease we applied
    >>>to the chains for the rain in Lancaster. " Grease on the chain: typical for rain? What other
    >>>techniques are recommended?
    >>
    >>What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    >>serves to attract dirt.
    >
    >
    > During el Nino here in nor-Cal, when pretty much everything washed out pretty quickly under the
    > deluge on rides over an hour or two, we used a wet chain lube as normal, and then put Judy Butter
    > (a relatively light grease) lightly over the top, which did seem to prevent it getting sluiced out
    > as quickly. It was more as a protective layer than as the only lube. Worked. Messy. But, worked.
    >
    > -- Jim

    I do something similar here -- Finish Line Teflon as the base coat (red cap), with their wax lube
    over it (silver cap). This seems to hold up very well in the rain and doesn't leave a sticky layer
    that catches dirt and grit.

    David
     
  6. I wax my chain, no washoff, stays clean. But it takes a little user effort to do it right.
    http://www.geocities.com/czcorner/tech3.html. Phil Wood Tenatious oil has good anti wash off
    properties, easier to apply, too. Not as clean, though.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  7. >What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    >serves to attract dirt.
    >-----------------
    >Alex

    I'd like to know that too. I've love to impregnate my chain with the same waterproof grease I'm
    using in my bearings!

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >>What I want to know is how they got the grease on the inside of the chain. On the outside, it only
    >>serves to attract dirt.
    >>-----------------
    >>Alex
    >
    >I'd like to know that too. I've love to impregnate my chain with the same waterproof grease I'm
    >using in my bearings!

    I got the scoop straight from the source. They oil the chain first. Then they add the grease. The
    grease keeps the oil in the chain. Since the pros get their bikes cleaned every day, they don't get
    a build up of dirt. A perk of being a pro is that you get your bike cleaned for you, so you don't
    need to worry about that like the rest of us.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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