Happy St. Patrick's Day

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Donal Fagan, Mar 17, 2004.

  1. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    I guess I'll play token Irish-American.

    I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to the
    Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the bums that
    were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I hope we'll be
    that smart in November.

    I'm reading Counsilman's 'Competitive Swimming Manual',
    which has a great front view sequence of Mark Spitz swimming
    crawl. Spitz looks forward, but as Counsilman writes, "Note
    that the water line is not at the forehead, but several
    inches above the hairline." Even looking forward, Spitz's
    head is submerged.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name
    to reply by e-mail)
     
    Tags:


  2. Pat

    Pat Guest

    "Donal Fagan"

    > I guess I'll play token Irish-American.

    Then add me to the list. My people are from Ennistymon,
    County Clare.

    >
    > I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to the
    > Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the bums
    > that were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I hope
    > we'll be that smart in November.

    Have you considered that the Spanish vote just might have
    given Al Qaeda the idea that they toppled a Western
    government by the use of bombs? And that they might---just
    might---try it over and over again?

    >
    > I'm reading Counsilman's 'Competitive Swimming Manual',
    > which has a great front view sequence of Mark Spitz
    > swimming crawl. Spitz looks forward, but as Counsilman
    > writes, "Note that the water line is not at the forehead,
    > but several inches above the hairline." Even looking
    > forward, Spitz's head is submerged.

    Yeah, yeah, great swimmer---but no Irishman.

    Pat in Texas
     
  3. Fal Leac

    Fal Leac Guest

    >Then add me to the list. My people are from Ennistymon,
    >County Clare.

    And Happy St Patrick's day to yourself and Mr Donal Fagan
    from me-self...

    My people came from Ballybay, County Monaghan and I'm from
    Derry. Sure doesn't the whole world become a wee bit smaller
    on St. Patrick's day.

    -Rob, also in Texas
     
  4. "Donal Fagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I guess I'll play token Irish-American.
    >
    > I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to the
    > Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the bums
    > that were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I hope
    > we'll be that smart in November.
    >
    And how do you feel about the IRA, who have killed more
    people in terrorist bombings than Al Quieda ? Maybe you've
    not heard of them though, the Brits just got on with it, and
    didn't declare war on the world the way the USA did when
    they got hurt. The IRA, a major terrorist organisation have
    been finance primarily from the USA for over 100 years, and
    still are. Makes you proud to be Irish- American does it?
    Try visiting Northern Ireland sometime and touch reality, it
    may change your way of thinking.
     
  5. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    don't be obtuse Duncan.

    "Duncan Heenan" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]
    2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    >
    > "Donal Fagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I guess I'll play token Irish-American.
    > >
    > > I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to
    > > the Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the
    > > bums that were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I
    > > hope we'll be that smart in November.
    > >
    > And how do you feel about the IRA, who have killed more
    > people in
    terrorist
    > bombings than Al Quieda ? Maybe you've not heard of them
    > though, the Brits just got on with it, and didn't declare
    > war on the world the way the USA did when they got hurt.
    > The IRA, a major terrorist organisation have been finance
    > primarily from
    the
    > USA for over 100 years, and still are. Makes you proud to
    > be Irish- American does it? Try visiting Northern Ireland
    > sometime and touch reality, it may change
    your
    > way of thinking.
    >
     
  6. Fal Leac

    Fal Leac Guest

    Look Ma... there's one of Ian Paisley's baboons...

    Ain't his butt shiny...

    It's got Troll tattoed across his arse in big bold letters!

    There's no Troll... like an Orange Troll!

    ROFLAO! at Duncan :D
     
  7. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > And how do you feel about the IRA, who have killed more
    > people in
    terrorist
    > bombings than Al Quieda ? Maybe you've not heard of them
    > though, the Brits just got on with it, and didn't declare
    > war on the world the way the USA did when they got hurt.
    > The IRA, a major terrorist organisation have been finance
    > primarily from
    the
    > USA for over 100 years, and still are. Makes you proud to
    > be Irish- American does it? Try visiting Northern Ireland
    > sometime and touch reality, it may change
    your
    > way of thinking.

    Been there, done that. I don't have anything to do with
    thugs. I can only be proud/embarrassed by things I've done--
    not things other people have done. I don't believe in
    collective guilt.

    And, I did visit Northern Ireland. It sure showed me how
    the Catholics have been discriminated against, and I'm not
    even Catholic!

    Pat in TX
    >
     
  8. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 10:33:47 -0600, "Pat"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Then add me to the list. My people are from Ennistymon,
    >County Clare.

    Some of mine are from Clare, some from Cork.

    >Have you considered that the Spanish vote just might have
    >given Al Qaeda the idea that they toppled a Western
    >government by the use of bombs?

    Of course I've read that interpretation by conservative
    columnists in the local rag. And al-Qaeda will certainly
    choose to believe that. But here is a letter from a Spanish
    lady that is posted on http://beautifulhorizons.typepad.com-
    /weblog/2004/03/arrogance_to_th.html

    >>>>
    I was watching TV this afternoon and there was footage
    showing how the railway service affected by the attack is
    working as usual since early this morning. It showed a
    trainful of commuters, some of them with tears in their
    eyes, some of them with an openly defiant expression on
    their faces. Some recognised they had felt a tingle in
    their stomach when boarding the train, but all said they
    were not going to change their life because of, and give in
    to, the assassins who had committed the atrocity. I can
    assure you that appeasement doesn't come into the equation.
    Those who think otherwise forget that we have thousands of
    PP and PSOE councillors, old and young, who are risking
    their lives on a daily basis in the Basque country,
    sometimes getting killed for it, precisely because they
    refuse to appease the ETA thugs.

    And they forget a very simple thing: Aznar had huge support
    for his hardline policy of non-appeasement of the ETA
    terrorists and their supporters, however, there was
    discontent about his lap-dog act towards Bush's war on
    'global terror' which, wrong or right, was perceived as
    inefficient and counterproductive. Discontent extended to
    other pressing domestic issues, he had antagonised
    practically all other political parties and more than a few
    regional governments due to his "you-are-with-me-or-against-
    me" attitude, his arrogance and his intolerance. However,
    there was a degree of apathy in the socialist camp, as
    Rodríguez Zapatero was thought not to have enough
    experience just yet.

    So, the PP knew that their antiterrorist policy (against
    ETA) was one of its main winning cards, and they didn't
    hesitate to blatantly manipulate the 11-M attack,
    suppressing information, calling people to demonstrate
    against ETA, knowing all the while that the Antiterrorist
    Information Brigade had as good as discarded ETA authorship
    a few hours after the attack. The antiterrorist police heads
    even threatened to resign at the madness of it all, and this
    was leaked to the opposition and the press. And all the
    while the state TVE showing documentaries about ETA
    activities right until late Saturday night, on the eve of
    the election, and failing to report live on Minister Acebes
    informing about the Al-Q line of investigation which he had
    been forced to acknowledge - forced by his own angered
    police heads and by the media which had all the information
    but was withholding it just long enough for the Minister to
    do the decent thing. This heartless manipulation of the dead
    for political gain clinched it - it was the last straw, it
    galvanised a portion of apathetic socialist voters who would
    have otherwise abstained, galvanised first-time voters, and
    galvanised Izquierda Unida voters (which include communists)
    who opted for heaping their vote on the PSOE for a higher
    chance of defeating Aznar (IU lost 5 seats because of that).
    In Spain, government change has always been heralded by a
    higher participation of voters. In a nutshell, many
    Spaniards felt badly abused, and acted accordingly. So, yes,
    11-M influenced the vote, but not because we are overcome by
    fear, or because we think that we can avert further attacks,
    but because we will only put up with so much lying and
    manipulation, and especially not when it is the dead and
    their families that are being heartlessly and shamelessly
    manipulated.
    >>>>

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name
    to reply by e-mail)
     
  9. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 20:25:51 -0000, "Duncan
    Heenan" wrote:

    >And how do you feel about the IRA, ...

    I've been to Ireland, and some of them were not shy about
    hating the Brits. I don't know how you go back and undo all
    the crimes committed by one group against another, but that
    seems to be the aim of many groups on the losing end of
    history. There doesn't seem to be much future in it, though.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name
    to reply by e-mail)
     
  10. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 17 Mar,
    "Duncan Heenan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Donal Fagan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I guess I'll play token Irish-American.
    > >
    > > I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to
    > > the Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the
    > > bums that were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I
    > > hope we'll be that smart in November.
    > >
    > And how do you feel about the IRA, who have killed more
    > people in terrorist bombings than Al Quieda ? Maybe you've
    > not heard of them though, the Brits just got on with it,
    > and didn't declare war on the world the way the USA did
    > when they got hurt. The IRA, a major terrorist
    > organisation have been finance primarily from the USA for
    > over 100 years, and still are. Makes you proud to be Irish-
    > American does it? Try visiting Northern Ireland sometime
    > and touch reality, it may change your way of thinking.
    >

    What a very well stated case. The hypocrisy of the USA on
    terrorism, having been the biggest funder of terrorism in
    Ireland, and probably many other places I have no connection
    with, to then declare war on terrorism (their narrow minded
    definition of terrorism) is more multi faceted than most
    town hall clocks. They were /not/ interested in any measures
    to prevent terrorism elsewhere, until they had the full fury
    of a terrorist atrocity inflicted on them.

    Facts:

    Many of the Israeli leaders over the last thirty years were
    "terrorists" in the forties.

    A recent winner of the Nobel peace prize, well respected
    world wide, was imprisoned for very many years as a
    "terrorist".

    The US record (even now) on human rights (even for it's own
    citizens of some races) is atrocious. It certainly was much
    worse in the sixties than many countries it criticises.

    Sort out the root causes of terrorism, (and it's funding),
    thus removing the fuel to produce the next generation of
    terrorists. The US activities since
    11/9 have done more to make the world a less safe place, and
    create more terrorists.

    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  11. Rtk

    Rtk Guest

    >>Try visiting Northern Ireland sometime and touch reality,
    >>it may change
    >

    Some time ago we bicycled through 1000 beautiful miles of
    Ireland. Up the west coast, across, and into a bit of
    Northern Ireland before going south and completing sort of a
    square. The short visit north was just enough to sense the
    tension that is always present. There was an incident, tiny
    and inconsequential, so that no one would ever hear of
    it. But I thought it was very telling. There was a bang.
    Two policemen began running in its direction. One fell
    down, got up quickly, but embarrassed, of course, and
    even more so when he recognized the bang was only a car
    back-firing. It was nothing and here we would have
    quickly recognized it for what it was. The extremely
    high state of tension was alarmed me,too. Imagine
    living like that all the time, for years and years,
    your senses so primed for something horrible that even
    a back-firing car can trip up the pursuing cop. I think
    it was a touch of reality, especially because of the
    smallness of it. I've lived in bad neighborhoods of big
    cities, but it would take more than a back-firing car
    to trigger my fight/flight reaction. This was worse,
    perhaps because it seemed even more random.

    Ruth Kazez
     
  12. Rtk

    Rtk Guest

    Donal Fagan wrote:

    > I can assure you that appeasement doesn't come into the
    > equation. Those who think otherwise forget that we have
    > thousands of PP and PSOE councillors, old and young, who
    > are risking their lives on a daily basis in the Basque
    > country, sometimes getting killed for it, precisely
    > because they refuse to appease the ETA thugs.

    Another bicycling episode, again 1000 miles, this time
    Portugal. Our return flight got sidetracked to Madrid. We
    were kept waiting on the plane for 2 hours before we saw all
    our luggage pulled quickly onto the tarmac and the dogs
    brought to sniff. We thought it could be a drug bust until
    we were asked to file quickly out of the plane. Immediately
    the plane was hauled to the outskirts of the airport while
    we were generously fed and then taken to the fanciest hotel
    I've ever been in. The room's mini bar was free, so our
    concerns became minimal when we were unexpectedly bussed
    back, returned to our seats and sent up flying back to New
    York. The next day's headlines: 4 bombs planted by Basques;
    3 go off, but the one on the airplane was removed.

    Ruth Kazez
     
  13. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 18 Mar,
    rtk <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > > Try visiting Northern Ireland sometime and touch
    > > > reality, it may change
    > >
    >
    > Some time ago we bicycled through 1000 beautiful miles of
    > Ireland. Up the west coast, across, and into a bit of
    > Northern Ireland before going south and completing sort of
    > a square. The short visit north was just enough to sense
    > the tension that is always present. There was an incident,
    > tiny and inconsequential, so that no one would ever hear
    > of it. But I thought it was very telling. There was a
    > bang. Two policemen began running in its direction. One
    > fell down, got up quickly, but embarrassed, of course, and
    > even more so when he recognized the bang was only a car
    > back-firing. It was nothing and here we would have quickly
    > recognized it for what it was. The extremely high state of
    > tension was alarmed me,too. Imagine living like that all
    > the time, for years and years, your senses so primed for
    > something horrible that even a back-firing car can trip up
    > the pursuing cop. I think it was a touch of reality,
    > especially because of the smallness of it. I've lived in
    > bad neighborhoods of big cities, but it would take more
    > than a back-firing car to trigger my fight/flight
    > reaction.

    I was once chased home once by three helicopters after
    my car had (alledgedly) backfired whilst passing the
    Maze prison.

    > This was worse, perhaps because it seemed even more
    > random.

    One of the more depressing thing I saw was when leaving
    where I lived during a thunderstorm some pre school children
    were playing barricades, and assumed the thunder was bombs
    going off. (about 12 went off that day in Belfast, we were
    about 8 miles away). Children of that age ought to be
    thinking of other things.

    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  14. "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Donal Fagan"
    >
    >> I guess I'll play token Irish-American.
    >
    >Then add me to the list. My people are from Ennistymon,
    >County Clare.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I wish things were happier, though. My condolences to the
    >> Spanish, but congratulations for throwing out the bums
    >> that were trying to shift blame from al-Qaeda. I hope
    >> we'll be that smart in November.
    >
    >Have you considered that the Spanish vote just might have
    >given Al Qaeda the idea that they toppled a Western
    >government by the use of bombs? And that they might---just
    >might---try it over and over again?

    We already know they are going to do it again, because they
    have been doing it again for many years. The election didn't
    change that. Given that the bombing occurred only a few days
    before the election, no matter how the Spanish voted, the
    result would be seen by some people as having been "caused"
    by Al Qaida.

    It doesn't matter. Spain has been fighting terrorism for
    decades, and the first statement from the new government was
    that its top priority would be to fight terrorism. Even if
    Al Qaida intended to influence the election, how can the
    outcome be a victory for them? The new government is not pro
    Al Qaida, and the threat to pull Spanish troops out of Iraq
    is not what Al Qaida wants. One of Al Qaida's stated goals
    was to involve the west in a great war. It makes more sense
    to argue that President Bush starting the war in Iraq was a
    victory for Al Qaida. It was one of their stated goals.

    martin
     
  15. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > This isn't either anti-Bush or pro-Kerry or even left vs. right; just an
    > observation and opinion:
    >
    > Too many columnists and talking heads (and talk radio
    > boors) are tossing out words like "appeasement,"
    > "capitulation," "negotiation," and "surrender."

    Bill O'Reilly said one day on his radio show that the
    Republican National Committee sends out a memo each day
    to all of the talk show hosts detailing what the RNC
    wants to be put out--as "spontaneous thoughts" by the
    talk show hosts. That is why you are seeing unanimous
    agreement by them.

    > Show me a single serious politician anywhere (Right, Left,
    > Spanish, French, whatever) who has suggested either
    > "capitulation" or "negotiation," much less "appeasement"
    > or "surrender." This is a straw man with no basis in
    > reality.

    I think what you and Donal are overlooking is the
    fundamentalist Islamist "man in the street." These are not
    exactly "thinking people" but those who are excited that
    their leaders' plans have worked so well.

    > What the world needs to do, however, is to realize that
    > the Arab national boundaries put in place after WWI
    > (Balfour) are artificial. What is going on in the mid-East
    > is basically a long-term, pan-Arab civil war, with the
    > thorny problem of Israel (product of post WWII Zionism)
    > put into the middle, and complicated by the meddling of
    > Western nations hungry for the natural resource of the
    > region. Terrorists want the West out of the region, so
    > that Islamic fundamentalism can prevail.

    Israel aside, I tend to think what is going on is a battle
    against modernity and a battle for total control according
    to fundamentalists interpretation of the Koran.

    > The West needs to decide whether cheap oil and support for
    > Israel are worth the fallout which comes from inserting
    > itself (the West) into what is going to be a 100 year
    > civil war, during which Islamic Arabia will work out its
    > own problems.

    Oh, if only it were that simple!

    >
    > Islamic fundamentalism probably needs to see its day in
    > the region, in the same way that communism had to have its
    > defining moment in the sun. Communism burned out because
    > of its fatal flaws, as will Islamic fundamentalism. But
    > Karl Marx had his champions until he had his 15 minutes of
    > fame (in world history time), and so Islamic
    > fundamentalism is seeking its own 15 minutes of existence.
    > Its just not worth the aggravation to be involved in this
    > colossal mess. Not when the price to be paid is the
    > nuclear immolation of an American city.

    But, the western "world" still needs the oil supply. You
    didn't address that. If we could break the need for that
    oil, things could be different. And, I don't believe people
    will ever abandon Israel.

    Pat in TX
     
  16. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > We already know they are going to do it again, because
    > they have been doing it again for many years. The election
    > didn't change that. Given that the bombing occurred only a
    > few days before the election, no matter how the Spanish
    > voted, the result would be seen by some people as having
    > been "caused" by Al Qaida.
    >
    > It doesn't matter. Spain has been fighting terrorism for
    > decades, and the first statement from the new government
    > was that its top priority would be to fight terrorism.
    > Even if Al Qaida intended to influence the election, how
    > can the outcome be a victory for them? The new government
    > is not pro Al Qaida, and the threat to pull Spanish troops
    > out of Iraq is not what Al Qaida wants. One of Al Qaida's
    > stated goals was to involve the west in a great war. It
    > makes more sense to argue that President Bush starting the
    > war in Iraq was a victory for Al Qaida. It was one of
    > their stated goals.
    >
    > martin

    I think that we are discussing it here on a much higher
    level than the average Al Qaeda supporter would even
    consider. They aren't looking at the subleties but at the
    gross cause and effect ideas.

    Pat in TX
     
  17. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > What a very well stated case. The hypocrisy of the USA on
    > terrorism,
    having
    > been the biggest funder of terrorism in Ireland, and
    > probably many other places I have no connection with, to
    > then declare war on terrorism (their narrow minded
    > definition of terrorism) is more multi faceted than most
    town
    > hall clocks. They were /not/ interested in any measures
    > to prevent
    terrorism
    > elsewhere, until they had the full fury of a terrorist
    > atrocity inflicted
    on
    > them.

    The mistake you are making and have made is to assume that
    there is one monolithic idea in the US on any problem in the
    world. If some Irish Americans send money to the IRA, it
    doesn't mean that is the face of US policy. People are
    individuals in this country, not robots in lockstep with any
    one ideology or government position. And, a blanket "they
    were not interested in any measures to prevent terrorism" is
    just childish boasting. Why? Because you simply do not know
    what is going on in this huge country.

    > Facts:
    >
    > Many of the Israeli leaders over the last thirty years
    > were "terrorists"
    in
    > the forties.

    So? Doesn't that depend upon one's interpretation of the
    word?

    > A recent winner of the Nobel peace prize, well respected
    > world wide, was imprisoned for very many years as a
    > "terrorist".

    Are you talking about Myanmar? And, who called her a
    terrorist? You?

    >
    > The US record (even now) on human rights (even for it's
    > own citizens of
    some
    > races) is atrocious. It certainly was much worse in the
    > sixties than many countries it criticises.

    Ah, you have now proved your ignorance.

    > Sort out the root causes of terrorism, (and it's funding),
    > thus removing
    the
    > fuel to produce the next generation of terrorists. The US
    > activities since
    > 11/9 have done more to make the world a less safe place,
    > and create more terrorists.
    --
    > BD

    And that wouldn't appease terrorists who are using religion
    as their raison d'etre, now would it?

    Pat in TX
     
  18. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 07:54:48 -0600, "Pat"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think what you and Donal are overlooking is the
    >fundamentalist Islamist "man in the street." These are not
    >exactly "thinking people" but those who are excited that
    >their leaders' plans have worked so well.

    What would you have me do? Vote for someone I don't trust
    just to piss off the Islamic man in the street? That would
    be a victory for al Qaeda.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name
    to reply by e-mail)
     
  19. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > >I think what you and Donal are overlooking is the
    > >fundamentalist Islamist "man in the street." These are
    > >not exactly "thinking people" but those who are excited
    > >that their leaders' plans have worked so well.
    >
    > What would you have me do? Vote for someone I don't trust
    > just to piss off the Islamic man in the street? That would
    > be a victory for al Qaeda.
    >
    >
    > Donal Fagan AIA

    no, of course not. I was referring to the belief that
    people who examine the issue would not, perhaps, give much
    credence to the belief that the Islamists' bombs brought
    down a government. it is my belief that the common fundamentalist--
    or even those on the sidelines in those countries just watching--
    would take a different meaning out of the episode. IOW,
    don't give those common people too much credit for
    critical thinking.

    Pat in TX
     
  20. "Larry Weisenthal" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > This isn't either anti-Bush or pro-Kerry or even left vs.
    > right; just an observation and opinion:
    >
    > Too many columnists and talking heads (and talk radio
    > boors) are tossing out words like "appeasement,"
    > "capitulation," "negotiation," and "surrender."
    >
    > Show me a single serious politician anywhere (Right, Left,
    > Spanish, French, whatever) who has suggested either
    > "capitulation" or "negotiation," much less "appeasement"
    > or "surrender." This is a straw man with no basis in
    > reality.
    >
    > What the world needs to do, however, is to realize that
    > the Arab national boundaries put in place after WWI
    > (Balfour) are artificial. What is going on in the mid-East
    > is basically a long-term, pan-Arab civil war, with the
    > thorny problem of Israel (product of post WWII Zionism)
    > put into the middle, and complicated by the meddling of
    > Western nations hungry for the natural resource of the
    > region. Terrorists want the West out of the region, so
    > that Islamic fundamentalism can prevail.
    >
    > The West needs to decide whether cheap oil and support for
    > Israel are worth the fallout which comes from inserting
    > itself (the West) into what is going to be a 100 year
    > civil war, during which Islamic Arabia will work out its
    > own problems.
    >
    > Islamic fundamentalism probably needs to see its day in
    > the region, in the same way that communism had to have its
    > defining moment in the sun. Communism burned out because
    > of its fatal flaws, as will Islamic fundamentalism. But
    > Karl Marx had his champions until he had his 15 minutes of
    > fame (in world history time), and so Islamic
    > fundamentalism is seeking its own 15 minutes of existence.
    > Its just not worth the aggravation to be involved in this
    > colossal mess. Not when the price to be paid is the
    > nuclear immolation of an American city.

    TE Laurence gave up on 'the Arabs' in the end, because he
    concluded late in life that there was not nation of 'Arabs',
    just tribes.
     
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