Houston Frame restorers

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by John L. Lucci, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. Does anyone know of a Houston Texas area frame restorer? I have a nice
    '88-89 vintage Specialized Sirrus (This is from when the Sirrus was
    still a road racing frame and still a road racing Allez under the
    cheaper, flasher paint and stickers.) that could use some touchup work.
    Especially the front fork tips. The paint on this bike is especially
    soft and almost immediately when the bike was new the paint chipped off
    the front fork tips where it comes in contact with the quick release
    "nut" and cam.

    Although I know that a newer bike would probably be more cost-effective
    than a restoration. I can't bring myself to go that route in light of
    the fact that this Sirrus as may be at most 5000 miles on it and is
    practically new. Also, being 5'4" it's hard to find a frame that really
    fits in this particular frame is a 43mm/14.5in.

    In a related question would it be worth while upgrading the entire bike
    with modern components (triple front chain rings, 10 speed rear hub,
    Brifters, etc.) As it stands the drive train is practically new albeit
    ' 88-89 technology [double front chain rings originally biopace, but
    converted to campy round rings 52 and 43 respectivelyand a shimano 105
    six speed rear hub and index shifting all around].) The only weakness
    is that the rear rim is almost played out (and I suspect it's probably
    the weight gain that I've undergone (when I first got the bike I was
    maybe 145 pounds and I am now 40 pounds heavier than that). Am I
    expecting too much for stock 32 spoke 700C wheels to support 185 pounds
    of weight?

    Thanks!

    John
     
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  2. John L. Lucci wrote:

    > Does anyone know of a Houston Texas area frame restorer? I have a nice
    > '88-89 vintage Specialized Sirrus (This is from when the Sirrus was
    > still a road racing frame and still a road racing Allez under the
    > cheaper, flasher paint and stickers.) that could use some touchup work.


    If all you need is a touch-up, I'd highly recommend just doing it
    yourself. You can find a dazzling array of car touch-up paint in little
    bottles with tiny little brushes. If you can track down the original
    spec on your bike's color, you can probably find a car painted in that
    same shade, and pick up the paint at a dealership. I've been lucky in
    that the Medium Steel Blue on my 1990 bike was still in use by BMW up
    until 2002 (I always wanted to get a Z3 to match my bike!) In a pinch,
    fingernail polish will work almost as well.

    > In a related question would it be worth while upgrading the entire bike
    > with modern components (triple front chain rings, 10 speed rear hub,
    > Brifters, etc.)


    The above-mentioned bike was built by Romic Cycles in northwest
    Houston. Ray, the founder, died a few years ago, but his son is still
    carrying on and rumor has it that he does pretty good work. When I
    considered upgrading my bike last year, he gave me a price of $700 to
    strip all the old paint, spread the rear stays and install a new bridge
    to accommodate a modern rear wheel, and re-paint the frame. I didn't
    ask if that included removing and/or installing components. It turned
    out that I was able to "manually" spread my stays from 126 (7-speed) to
    130 (9-speed) without the need for him to do any brazing work, so I did
    it the quick and cheap paint touch-up method I mentioned above. Which
    left me with enough $$ to afford a whole new STI setup, and I can't
    recommend *that* upgrade highly enough! I'd recommend a
    consultation/visit with your LBS before attempting to install a triple
    on the front, though. The arrangement of your BB and chainstays might
    not allow it.

    Romic's info:
    Romic Cycle Co Inc
    22806 Industry Ln, Tomball, TX 77375
    (281) 351-9193

    > The only weakness
    > is that the rear rim is almost played out (and I suspect it's probably
    > the weight gain that I've undergone (when I first got the bike I was
    > maybe 145 pounds and I am now 40 pounds heavier than that). Am I
    > expecting too much for stock 32 spoke 700C wheels to support 185 pounds
    > of weight?


    A 32-spoke wheel shouldn't have had any problem carrying 185 lbs. If It
    won't stay true, it makes it logically easier to just trash it. A new
    wheel, properly dished for 9 or 10 speeds, can be found practically
    anywhere. And the higher the spoke count, the cheaper it should be.

    Good luck, and keep us posted on your progress!

    Curt
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "John L. Lucci" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does anyone know of a Houston Texas area frame restorer? I have a nice
    > '88-89 vintage Specialized Sirrus (This is from when the Sirrus was
    > still a road racing frame and still a road racing Allez under the
    > cheaper, flasher paint and stickers.) that could use some touchup work.
    > Especially the front fork tips. The paint on this bike is especially
    > soft and almost immediately when the bike was new the paint chipped off
    > the front fork tips where it comes in contact with the quick release
    > "nut" and cam.
    >
    > Although I know that a newer bike would probably be more cost-effective
    > than a restoration. I can't bring myself to go that route in light of
    > the fact that this Sirrus as may be at most 5000 miles on it and is
    > practically new. Also, being 5'4" it's hard to find a frame that really
    > fits in this particular frame is a 43mm/14.5in.
    >
    > In a related question would it be worth while upgrading the entire bike
    > with modern components (triple front chain rings, 10 speed rear hub,
    > Brifters, etc.) As it stands the drive train is practically new albeit
    > ' 88-89 technology [double front chain rings originally biopace, but
    > converted to campy round rings 52 and 43 respectivelyand a shimano 105
    > six speed rear hub and index shifting all around].) The only weakness
    > is that the rear rim is almost played out (and I suspect it's probably
    > the weight gain that I've undergone (when I first got the bike I was
    > maybe 145 pounds and I am now 40 pounds heavier than that). Am I
    > expecting too much for stock 32 spoke 700C wheels to support 185 pounds
    > of weight?


    Houston is quite flat, I thought. The front chain wheels
    are well suited to flat terrain. Does the gearing not suit
    you? How many cogs on the rear cogwheels? I think the
    gearing and all are fine the way you describe it.

    Such wheels could be made sufficiently strong for you. Age
    has probably caught up with the wheels. You should measure
    the actual rim wall thicknes. Remove the tire. Put a
    bearing ball inside the rim, measure the thickness of ball
    and wall, subtract the diameter of the ball to get the rim
    wall thickness. Measure several places. The rim wall
    should be more thatn 0.5 mm thick. If the rim wallsare
    sufficiently thick, then true the wheel. Put penetrating
    lubricant, such as LPS2, on the spokes and nipples the day
    before you attempt to turn the spoke nipples to free the
    threads.

    Would you like to know how to build wheels?. If the rim is
    worn out, you might find a rim with the same effective rim
    diameter (ERD); i.e. would use the same length spokes as
    you have. Then you can lace the new rim onto the hub one
    spoke at a time, then tighten, true, tension-balance, and
    stress relieve the new wheel. Or maybe you need to
    replace the spokes also.

    I opine: do not put all that money into a new set of
    components. If you do then build 36 spoke wheels as well.
    And if you do decide to change the components look for
    used equipment. There is plenty of great stuff floating
    around. Good luck.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  4. On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 09:08:58 GMT, "John L. Lucci"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Although I know that a newer bike would probably be more cost-effective
    >than a restoration. I can't bring myself to go that route in light of
    >the fact that this Sirrus as may be at most 5000 miles on it and is
    >practically new. Also, being 5'4" it's hard to find a frame that really
    >fits in this particular frame is a 43mm/14.5in.


    If it fits, it's cheaper than buying a new one.

    >In a related question would it be worth while upgrading the entire bike
    >with modern components (triple front chain rings, 10 speed rear hub,
    >Brifters, etc.) As it stands the drive train is practically new albeit
    >' 88-89 technology [double front chain rings originally biopace, but
    >converted to campy round rings 52 and 43 respectivelyand a shimano 105
    >six speed rear hub and index shifting all around].) The only weakness
    >is that the rear rim is almost played out (and I suspect it's probably
    >the weight gain that I've undergone (when I first got the bike I was
    >maybe 145 pounds and I am now 40 pounds heavier than that). Am I
    >expecting too much for stock 32 spoke 700C wheels to support 185 pounds
    >of weight?


    Sure, why not upgrade. As long as you do the work yourself, the cost of a
    full new set of components ought to be at or just under the level of an
    entire bike with the same components (consider buying a bike with your
    level of kit on and selling the frame & fork off on ebay -- you might get
    a cheaper deal that way).

    When you say 'the rim is almost played out', what exactly do you mean?
    Rims usually wear out on the braking surfaces, and that's caused by, you
    guessed it, braking.

    Jasper
     
  5. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Jasper Janssen wrote:
    >
    > When you say 'the rim is almost played out', what exactly do you mean?
    > Rims usually wear out on the braking surfaces, and that's caused by, you
    > guessed it, braking.


    I have never had a rim wear out from brake wear. They always become
    bent to the point that thay can no longer be trued. I would not be
    surprised if that is what the OP means by "almost played out".

    When I lived in Austin, Texas (where it rains infrequently) and I
    worked as a bike shop mechanic, the only rims I ever saw with major
    brake track wear were those used by off-road cyclists.

    Chalo Colina
     
  6. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Jasper Janssen wrote:
    >
    > When you say 'the rim is almost played out', what exactly do you mean?
    > Rims usually wear out on the braking surfaces, and that's caused by, you
    > guessed it, braking.


    I have never had a rim wear out from brake wear. They always become
    bent to the point that thay can no longer be trued. I would not be
    surprised if that is what the OP means by "almost played out".

    When I lived in Austin, Texas (where it rains infrequently) and I
    worked as a bike shop mechanic, the only rims I ever saw with major
    brake track wear were those used by off-road cyclists.

    Chalo Colina
     
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