Kinesium Frames

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dennis Vaughn, Jun 18, 2003.

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  1. What can anyone tell me about kinesium frames? Are they any good? Do they last? I am looking at a
    bike that uses a Kinesium frame that is relatively low priced....almost too low to sound good. I
    don't know the real reputation of the bike source. The lbs here say the bike price is really just
    component pricing cause the frame is junk. What to do?
     
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  2. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 15:35:47 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What can anyone tell me about kinesium frames? Are they any good? Do they last? I am looking at a
    >bike that uses a Kinesium frame that is relatively low priced....almost too low to sound good. I
    >don't know the real reputation of the bike source. The lbs here say the bike price is really just
    >component pricing cause the frame is junk. What to do?
    >
    Isn't Kinesium just Knesis (sp?) (the fork makers) answer to the Scandium hype? A modified 6061 Alu?
    ( I could be wrong but that ia what I thought)

    Who built the frame? Design and construction are more an issue than material.
     
  3. Mad Doc

    Mad Doc New Member

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    I'm also looking at a similar bike from Merlin Cycles as advertised in mountain Biking mag. An advert for the fram suggests that the frame got a 5 out of 5 in two mag reviews. Other revies I have seen have all been positive. It's pretty light but I have seen lighterframes on similar priced bikes such as the Giant SE2. However there are swings and roundabouts in terms of other parts of the spec. Pictures of the frame suggest it is nicely butted for extra strength but I can't work out what byhe geometry is.
     
  4. It is a Motobecanne. I have not heard of the bike till I got to FL. I have read good reviews on the
    bike in Bicycling Magazine. How should I take the article? Most riders in my area ride Trek,
    Specialized, Cannondale, and Giant. I want a bike that is going to be good for long distance riding.
    I have ridden the Carbon Trek 5200, and Kestrel Talon. Both bikes are too much in my opinion, but I
    did like the feel of the ride. I did not like the ride feel of aluminum (except for Klein) due to
    road feel. Would a carbon seat post make a difference with aluminum? I like the ride of steel, but
    did not like the look of the bikes that I've tried, and the steel now I think is waaaayy out of my
    price range. Any suggestions? Dennis "ajames54" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 15:35:47 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >What can anyone tell me about kinesium frames? Are they any good? Do
    they
    > >last? I am looking at a bike that uses a Kinesium frame that is
    relatively
    > >low priced....almost too low to sound good. I don't know the real reputation of the bike
    > >source. The lbs here say the bike price is really just component pricing cause the frame is
    > >junk. What to do?
    > >
    > Isn't Kinesium just Knesis (sp?) (the fork makers) answer to the Scandium hype? A modified 6061
    > Alu? ( I could be wrong but that ia what I thought)
    >
    > Who built the frame? Design and construction are more an issue than material.
     
  5. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 18:38:00 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It is a Motobecanne. I have not heard of the bike till I got to FL. I have read good reviews on the
    >bike in Bicycling Magazine. How should I take the article? Most riders in my area ride Trek,
    >Specialized, Cannondale, and Giant. I want a bike that is going to be good for long distance
    >riding. I have ridden the Carbon Trek 5200, and Kestrel Talon. Both bikes are too much in my
    >opinion, but I did like the feel of the ride. I did not like the ride feel of aluminum (except for
    >Klein) due to road feel. Would a carbon seat post make a difference with aluminum? I like the ride
    >of steel, but did not like the look of the bikes that I've tried, and the steel now I think is
    >waaaayy out of my price range. Any suggestions? Dennis

    Motobecanne used to make great bikes.. Though I've heard nothing either for or against them lately.
    Check out some of the review sites. As far as the lbs claim that the frame is worthless I would be
    very surprised if that was the case... sounds like poor sales staff to me...
     
  6. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 15:35:47 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What can anyone tell me about kinesium frames? Are they any good? Do they last? I am looking at a
    >bike that uses a Kinesium frame that is relatively low priced....almost too low to sound good. I
    >don't know the real reputation of the bike source. The lbs here say the bike price is really just
    >component pricing cause the frame is junk. What to do?

    I just did a Google search for "kinesium alloy"; then actually looked at every listing they found.
    It seems kinesium only exists in the cycling world, sort of like dilithium crystals only exist on
    warp capable starships.

    If this was more than a bike tubing specific trademark you'd think it would be found on metallurgy
    sites, or aviation sites, or some other technical area. So what is kinesium anyway?

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  7. Scott Gates

    Scott Gates Guest

    Dennis, Last year I bought a Motobecane Le Champion Team. As far as the frameset, It's what you
    would expect from an Al bike. If the geometry fits your fancy, I would say it's as good as most
    bikes in the category. I've got around 6K on mine now. I've changed to a C post and handlebars, a
    seat that fits me, a stem to fit better, and changed the wheelset. The carbon bits do help dampen
    some vibration. The factory wheels need to be tensioned and stress relieved, if you plan on riding
    them. My 2 cents worth - Scott "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What can anyone tell me about kinesium frames? Are they any good? Do
    they
    > last? I am looking at a bike that uses a Kinesium frame that is
    relatively
    > low priced....almost too low to sound good. I don't know the real reputation of the bike
    > source. The lbs here say the bike price is really just component pricing cause the frame is
    > junk. What to do?
     
  8. Matt J

    Matt J Guest

    ajames54 wrote:
    > Motobecanne used to make great bikes.. Though I've heard nothing either for or against them
    > lately. Check out some of the review sites.

    I think I read somewhere (on here maybe?) that the new Motobecane is a different company from the
    old one. http://tinyurl.com/es97 Matt
     
  9. Scott Gates

    Scott Gates Guest

    The bikes currently marketed in the US as Motobecanes, are not made by the Old French Motobecane
    company, I think they still sell bikes in Europe under the MBK brand. My understanding is that the
    use of the Motobecane name was purchased by a US group, who orders the bikes to their specifications
    from Taiwan, and markets them as Motobecane USA. The gentleman who owns the Cycle Spectrum chain of
    bike shops, and WWW.Bikesdirect.com is a player (perhaps the only one?) in bringing the name back to
    the US market. I believe it is his wife who sells them on Ebay as Sprtymama. You might be interested
    in the warranty on them, check it out at www.motobecane.com They warranty the frame forever, and in
    the event of a failure they replace the bike, not the frame.

    "Matt J" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ajames54 wrote:
    > > Motobecanne used to make great bikes.. Though I've heard nothing either for or against them
    > > lately. Check out some of the review sites.
    >
    > I think I read somewhere (on here maybe?) that the new Motobecane is a different company from the
    > old one. http://tinyurl.com/es97 Matt
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "ajames54" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 18:38:00 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >It is a Motobecanne. I have not heard of the bike till I got to FL. I
    have
    > >read good reviews on the bike in Bicycling Magazine. How should I take
    the
    > >article? Most riders in my area ride Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, and Giant. I want a bike that
    > >is going to be good for long distance riding.
    I
    > >have ridden the Carbon Trek 5200, and Kestrel Talon. Both bikes are too much in my opinion, but I
    > >did like the feel of the ride. I did not like
    the
    > >ride feel of aluminum (except for Klein) due to road feel. Would a
    carbon
    > >seat post make a difference with aluminum? I like the ride of steel, but did not like the look of
    > >the bikes that I've tried, and the steel now I think is waaaayy out of my price range. Any
    > >suggestions? Dennis
    >
    > Motobecanne used to make great bikes.. Though I've heard nothing either for or against them
    > lately. Check out some of the review sites. As far as the lbs claim that the frame is worthless I
    > would be very surprised if that was the case... sounds like poor sales staff to me...

    When the trademark/tradename Motobecane passed into open use, someone though there might be some
    residual value remaining. Similar to Weyless and Mercier, these USA-marketed Chinese products bear
    no relation to the classic manufacturers.

    When the LBS spoke disparagingly he was upholding a long-honored practice in bicycle stores that
    anything not sold on premises is called "junk" or worse. Shabby behavior. But there isn't a whole
    lot to say about a frame contracted to the low bidder in China to fill out a marketing project. They
    are probably no better and no worse than any similar no-name Chinese aluminum bike.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. so my next question is this: Does a carbon fiber seat post, and handlebar make enough difference in
    road feel to warrant aluminum bike purchase? I have not found an aluminum bike that has the ride of
    carbon other than Klein. I like the road feel of carbon, but think it's a bit pricey. I rode a
    Lemond Zurich today and I thought the bike felt a bit like the aluminum that I have ridden. I wonder
    if the tires are what transmitting the road feel? The reason I say this is cause this is the first
    steel bike that felt like this. I have an old steel Murray 10sp that does not feel anything like
    this. Of course it could be that the tires are not inflated to 120psi (55psi max is on sidewall) and
    it is a 26x1 3/8 wheel. Hmmm....

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "ajames54" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > > On Wed, 18 Jun 2003 18:38:00 -0400, "Dennis Vaughn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >It is a Motobecanne. I have not heard of the bike till I got to FL. I
    > have
    > > >read good reviews on the bike in Bicycling Magazine. How should I take
    > the
    > > >article? Most riders in my area ride Trek, Specialized, Cannondale,
    and
    > > >Giant. I want a bike that is going to be good for long distance
    riding.
    > I
    > > >have ridden the Carbon Trek 5200, and Kestrel Talon. Both bikes are
    too
    > > >much in my opinion, but I did like the feel of the ride. I did not
    like
    > the
    > > >ride feel of aluminum (except for Klein) due to road feel. Would a
    > carbon
    > > >seat post make a difference with aluminum? I like the ride of steel,
    but
    > > >did not like the look of the bikes that I've tried, and the steel now I think is waaaayy out of
    > > >my price range. Any suggestions? Dennis
    > >
    > > Motobecanne used to make great bikes.. Though I've heard nothing either for or against them
    > > lately. Check out some of the review sites. As far as the lbs claim that the frame is worthless
    > > I would be very surprised if that was the case... sounds like poor sales staff to me...
    >
    >
    > When the trademark/tradename Motobecane passed into open use, someone
    though
    > there might be some residual value remaining. Similar to Weyless and Mercier, these USA-marketed
    > Chinese products bear no relation to the
    classic
    > manufacturers.
    >
    > When the LBS spoke disparagingly he was upholding a long-honored practice
    in
    > bicycle stores that anything not sold on premises is called "junk" or
    worse.
    > Shabby behavior. But there isn't a whole lot to say about a frame contracted to the low bidder in
    > China to fill out a marketing project.
    They
    > are probably no better and no worse than any similar no-name Chinese aluminum bike.
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  12. gbesq

    gbesq New Member

    Joined:
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    Dennis,

    I have seen frames from Kinesis on several bikes and I've always been impressed. They make a very good frame. Kinesis is a major manufacturer of aluminim frames based in Taiwan that welds for a number of big name bicycle manufacturers. "Kinesium" is simply their version of a 6061 series aluminum alloy, which is commonly used in many aluminum bike frames. Kinesis also produces some very good quality carbon fiber forks used by a number of manufacturers. The frame is inexpensive because the associated labor costs in Asia are dirt cheap compared to what it costs to produce a similar frame in the U.S. (as does Cannondale, for example). Motobecane U.S.A. is not the same company as the old French Motobecane (which went bankruptcy some time ago). I believe that Motobecane sold the rights to its name, which is where Motobecane U.S.A. comes in. Word on the street, however, is that Motobecane U.S.A. is building very good bikes at ridiculously low prices. The tradeoff is that they have a very limited distribution network in the U.S. and virtually no dealer support. In short, it's a bargain, but don't expect lots of name recognition or any support from Motobecane U.S.A.
     
  13. itsacarr

    itsacarr New Member

    Joined:
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    Not really sure if the original question was ever really answered completely so ill take stab at it. I personally love the Kinesium frame that I ride. From what I know it is called Kinesium, due to the fact that it is made in the Kinesis factory. Basically it's there 6061 with titanium thrown into the mix giving it some interesting properties. Stiffness and responsivness (only spelled correctly), and longetivity over time. With the material they are able to make tubes thinner than most on the walls giving it great weight properties, or lack there of :) All at a fearly good price. So in light it's alot like Eastons Scandium. A fancy material made from a not so completely fancy material that in the end works really well. I hope this comment was'nt too delayed or redundant.
     
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