Knobbly Tyres (and thread direction)

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by zzapper, Jul 5, 2004.

  1. zzapper

    zzapper Guest

    Hi,
    A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.

    secondly I maintain a number of cycles, and it seems to me that it's
    not always easy to tell the thread direction, is there a "trick" for
    telling which way round the wheel should go on?

    zzapper
     
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  2. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "zzapper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    > A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    > non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    > mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.


    Your mate is correct, swapping knobblies for slicks like these will give
    you about another 2-3 mph for the same effort.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360007832

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5360008376

    --
    Simon Mason
    Anlaby
    East Yorkshire.
    53°44'N 0°26'W
    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  3. davek

    davek Guest

    zzapper:
    > secondly I maintain a number of cycles, and it seems to me that it's
    > not always easy to tell the thread direction, is there a "trick" for
    > telling which way round the wheel should go on?


    In my experience, tyres often have an arrow on the side to help with this.
    If they don't have an arrow, then it probably doesn't matter. I'm not
    actually sure it matters anyway.

    d.
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, zzapper
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Hi,
    > A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    > non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    > mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.


    True. Use slicks on tarmac; makes a considerable difference.

    > secondly I maintain a number of cycles, and it seems to me that it's
    > not always easy to tell the thread direction, is there a "trick" for
    > telling which way round the wheel should go on?


    Good tyres have arrows marked on the sides!

    But generally, for off-road tyres, rear tyres should have the sharper,
    scoopier edges facing backwards at the bottom (for traction) and the
    front tyre should have them facing forwards (for braking). But really
    no tyre can be suitable for both the front and the back of a serious
    off-road bike since the two wheels do such radically different jobs, so
    you should have a tyre set like Velociraptor with a different front and
    rear tread, and then use the arrows.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    .::;===r==\
    / /___||___\____
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  5. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    zzapper wrote:
    > Hi,
    > A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    > non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    > mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.


    Slicker tyres will speed you up at least a bit, and also will provide
    better grip on road, in the dry and wet... really!

    > secondly I maintain a number of cycles, and it seems to me that it's
    > not always easy to tell the thread direction, is there a "trick" for
    > telling which way round the wheel should go on?


    Tread direction, I guess you mean. Depends on the tyres but generally
    the arrow shapes of tread point to the front. Can be different with
    certain mud (rear?) tyres, I think.

    It's traditional for tyres to have the label on the right-hand sidewall
    but that's not quite always the case.

    ~PB
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    zzapper wrote:

    > A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    > non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    > mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.


    S/he speaks much wisdom. And it wouldn't matter if you were on a 6
    minute old full suspension Cannondale, you'd still be slowed down with
    knobblies on.
    And not only slowed down, but made noisier and with inferior cornering
    on hard surfaces. Knobblies are great on the soft stuff, but absolute
    pants on the road.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Ian G Batten

    Ian G Batten Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:
    > And not only slowed down, but made noisier and with inferior cornering
    > on hard surfaces. Knobblies are great on the soft stuff, but absolute
    > pants on the road.


    I run Panaracer Speedblasters, which are the best (and worst) of both
    worlds. They're not too slow, they're light, they're OK on hard packed
    offroad but useless on wet grass or mud. My wife complains on road that
    my bike sounds like a tractor, too. They also have the puncture
    resistance of a thin pair of tights.

    ian
     
  8. zzapper

    zzapper Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > S/he speaks much wisdom. And it wouldn't matter if you were on a 6
    > minute old full suspension Cannondale, you'd still be slowed down with
    > knobblies on.
    > And not only slowed down, but made noisier and with inferior cornering
    > on hard surfaces. Knobblies are great on the soft stuff, but absolute
    > pants on the road.
    >
    > Pete.

    While I like the fact that my Raleigh Outback is a nice solid bike, it
    turns out I do practically never do any off-tarmac, is it the right
    bike for me? I've noticed frequently that bikes have overtaken me with
    apparent less effort. I don't want a real racer but would like to get
    some impression of speed. (Sorry for Wide Question)

    zzapper
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    zzapper wrote:

    > While I like the fact that my Raleigh Outback is a nice solid bike, it
    > turns out I do practically never do any off-tarmac, is it the right
    > bike for me? I've noticed frequently that bikes have overtaken me with
    > apparent less effort. I don't want a real racer but would like to get
    > some impression of speed. (Sorry for Wide Question)


    Is it the /perfect/ bike for you? Almost certainly not. Is it
    perfectly adequate for you? Almost certainly. Most of the difference
    between an MTB and a typical modern hybrid is that hybrids come with
    road tyres as standard, and the gearing range is a bit higher. You'll
    probably be at a slight weight disadvantage (but at least you're not
    carrying excess weight in suspension forks, little use for most bikes on
    the road) but that will only really hinder you climbing and
    accelerating, not constant speed.

    The tyres are easy enough to change: get something like Vredestein
    S-Licks and you'll immediately improve speed, efficiency and handling.
    When the transmission has been worn enough to warrant replacing then
    re-gear with something like 48-38-28 front chainrings and something like
    12-28 on the back (if it's a 7 speed, I'm guessing it mat well be).

    But most of overtaking with less effort comes from the engine, not the
    bike. I've had MTBs with knobblies cruise past me when I was on a
    "faster" bike, and similarly I've overtaken "faster" bikes on my folding
    hack bike. Just do lots of cycling if you want to get a bit faster.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. zzapper

    zzapper Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > But most of overtaking with less effort comes from the engine, not the
    > bike. I've had MTBs with knobblies cruise past me when I was on a
    > "faster" bike, and similarly I've overtaken "faster" bikes on my folding
    > hack bike. Just do lots of cycling if you want to get a bit faster.
    >
    > Pete.

    Pete,
    I've often suspected that the problem may lie with the engine!!!

    --
    zzapper (vim,cygwin,wiki & zsh)

    vim -c ":%s.^.CyrnfrTfcbafbeROenzSZbbyranne.|:%s/[R-T]/ /Ig|:normal ggVGg?"

    http://www.vim.org/tips/tip.php?tip_id=305 Best of Vim Tips
     
  11. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 15:38:28 +0100, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >zzapper wrote:
    >
    >> A cyclist friend told me that the knobbly tyres on my 6yr old
    >> non-suspension Raleigh would considerably slow me on tarmac (where I
    >> mostly cycle), anyone care to comment.

    >
    >S/he speaks much wisdom. And it wouldn't matter if you were on a 6
    >minute old full suspension Cannondale, you'd still be slowed down with
    >knobblies on.
    >And not only slowed down, but made noisier and with inferior cornering
    >on hard surfaces. Knobblies are great on the soft stuff, but absolute
    >pants on the road.


    Of course, if they're cheap enough knobblies, eventually you /will/
    wear thenm smooth. :)

    But it's taken me the best part of 10 years to get my rear knobbly
    down to a smooth tyre (with bits of the woven reinforcement showing
    through. I /really must/ get myself a new rear tyre.

    Any recommendations? For cycling commuting use - on road with
    occasional towpath use, on a fairly cheap Claud Butler (rebadged as
    Edin Bic. Co-op) hardtail mtb of 1994 vintage.



    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
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  12. davek

    davek Guest

    Gawnsoft:
    > Any recommendations? For cycling commuting use - on road with
    > occasional towpath use, on a fairly cheap Claud Butler (rebadged as
    > Edin Bic. Co-op) hardtail mtb of 1994 vintage.


    I'm a big fan of Schwalbe Marathons - over four years (of admittedly
    intermittent cycling) I had two punctures, both on the rear wheel, and none
    at all on the front. The back one wore out eventually but the front one
    still has plenty of life in it.

    d.
     
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