Last three days taper before marathon

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Edward, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Edward

    Edward Guest

    I am running London on Sunday and according to my schedule (Bruce Tulloh's Sub 3.00 in
    Runners World)

    Today (Wednesday) 4m slow (30min) Thursday Rest Friday Rest Saturday 2m (15m) easy Sunday 26.2
    m (2h xxm)

    2 questions:

    Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?

    Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?

    I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this was
    the best way to complete the week.

    TIA

    Edward
     
    Tags:


  2. Amh

    Amh Guest

    [email protected] (Edward) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am running London on Sunday and according to my schedule (Bruce Tulloh's Sub 3.00 in
    > Runners World)
    >
    > Today (Wednesday) 4m slow (30min) Thursday Rest Friday Rest Saturday 2m (15m) easy Sunday 26.2 m
    > (2h xxm)
    >
    > 2 questions:
    >
    > Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?

    If you've followed the program up to now and feel good about it why question it in the last 3 days?

    Nothing you can do in the last 3 days, other than injuring yourself or running a workout you can't
    recover from, is going to help or hurt.

    >
    > Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?

    Strides have greater potential for injuring you than for helping you.

    >
    > I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this
    > was the best way to complete the week.

    Sounds reasonable to me.

    my $0.02 Andy
     
  3. Rick++

    Rick++ Guest

    > Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?

    I such running light-normal just before the marathon. I get jumpy if I take too many rest days.
    Trying NEW things so close to a marathon may not work.
     
  4. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    I wouldn't even run the 2 miles the day before.

    "Edward" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am running London on Sunday and according to my schedule (Bruce Tulloh's Sub 3.00 in
    > Runners World)
    >
    > Today (Wednesday) 4m slow (30min) Thursday Rest Friday Rest Saturday 2m (15m) easy Sunday 26.2 m
    > (2h xxm)
    >
    > 2 questions:
    >
    > Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?
    >
    > Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?
    >
    > I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this
    > was the best way to complete the week.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Edward
     
  5. I am a firm believer in using interval taper to prepare for a big race. This would have me doing a
    few short intense intervals on Thursday and Friday. I always do absolutely nothing the day before
    a marathon.

    If this is your first, or you really are not concerned that much with your time, then I would not
    suggest interval taper.

    Michael

    "Edward" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am running London on Sunday and according to my schedule (Bruce Tulloh's Sub 3.00 in
    > Runners World)
    >
    > Today (Wednesday) 4m slow (30min) Thursday Rest Friday Rest Saturday 2m (15m) easy Sunday 26.2 m
    > (2h xxm)
    >
    > 2 questions:
    >
    > Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?
    >
    > Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?
    >
    > I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this
    > was the best way to complete the week.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Edward
     
  6. Steve Common

    Steve Common Guest

    [email protected] (Edward) wrote:

    >Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?

    Yes. Perfect even. This is when you'll store the major part of the glycogen you'll be needing on
    Sunday. If you can, spend as much time as possible sitting or lying down. If you're used to it, a
    complete stretching session can be good.

    Also, get plenty of sleep these nights, Saturday's less important but Friday's essential.

    >Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?

    Sounds OK. I used to do 20' easy + 5x200m at race pace put I don't think it made any difference over
    a 20' jog.

    >I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this was
    >the best way to complete the week.

    An unreserved yes!

    Eat plenty of pasta, rice, potatoes and such and plenty of water. Fish and poultry if you eat meat.
    Nothing too spicey and go easy on the veggies on Saturday and avoid anything that "ferments"
    (cabbage, cauli, baked beans :).

    Oh and no piss-up on Friday night :)
     
  7. Edward

    Edward Guest

    [email protected] (Edward) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am running London on Sunday and according to my schedule (Bruce Tulloh's Sub 3.00 in
    > Runners World)
    >
    > Today (Wednesday) 4m slow (30min) Thursday Rest Friday Rest Saturday 2m (15m) easy Sunday 26.2 m
    > (2h xxm)
    >
    > 2 questions:
    >
    > Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?
    >
    > Is the 2m on Saturday good, and would some strides be a good idea?
    >
    > I have followed this schedule reasonably closely and am feeling good, but just wondered if this
    > was the best way to complete the week.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Edward

    Have decided to do circuit training today - there is some running but I can do that really slowly,
    and the rest of the stuff is just mild CV work and muscle toning. I just want to remind my body that
    there is a big effort coming up and not to go to sleep!

    Thanks for all the responses anyway - will let you know how it goes!

    Edward
     
  8. Chris Smith

    Chris Smith Guest

    steve common wrote:

    > [email protected] (Edward) wrote:
    >
    > >Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?
    >
    > Yes. Perfect even. This is when you'll store the major part of the glycogen you'll be needing on
    > Sunday. If you can, spend as much time as possible sitting or lying down. If you're used to it, a
    > complete stretching session can be good.

    Steve, I bow to your speed and marathon chops compared to mine, but let me ask you to say more about
    this answer. I have read (I think Pfitzinger) that during glycogen loading in the two to three days
    prior to marathon day, it's helpful to do a very short, very slow run as an added stimulus to
    glycogen storing. What's your take on that? thanks. chris
     
  9. Edward

    Edward Guest

    Chris Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > steve common wrote:
    >
    > > [email protected] (Edward) wrote:
    > >
    > > >Is rest on Thurs and Fri correct?
    > >
    > > Yes. Perfect even. This is when you'll store the major part of the glycogen you'll be needing on
    > > Sunday. If you can, spend as much time as possible sitting or lying down. If you're used to it,
    > > a complete stretching session can be good.
    >
    > Steve, I bow to your speed and marathon chops compared to mine, but let me ask you to say more
    > about this answer. I have read (I think Pfitzinger) that during glycogen loading in the two to
    > three days prior to marathon day, it's helpful to do a very short, very slow run as an added
    > stimulus to glycogen storing. What's your take on that? thanks. chris

    Thanks for all the info guys - so much conflicting advice (have posted this on runners world uk
    London Marathon Forum too).

    What I am concerned with is that after such a heavy training schedule in the foregoing three months,
    stopping for two days might lead my body to "shut down". That is what my training partner thinks (he
    is a 1m 45s 800 metre guy, and knows a thing or two about running).

    I also thought I read somewhere about the run helping glycogen loading, though I recalled that the
    run was supposed to be eyeballs-out! So confusing.

    Edward
     
  10. Steve Common

    Steve Common Guest

    Chris Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve, I bow to your speed and marathon chops compared to mine, but let me ask you to say more
    >about this answer. I have read (I think Pfitzinger) that during glycogen loading in the two to
    >three days prior to marathon day, it's helpful to do a very short, very slow run as an added
    >stimulus to glycogen storing. What's your take on that?

    If the training is really light, yes, I expect it should be OK. But I hadn't heard that it actually
    helped. Interesting. And not at all unreasonable. The light runs would maybe keep the enzymes levels
    higher than by resting completely... Hmmmmmm.

    I was aware of the "eyeballs out" run theory, but that was proposed (and is still is), as the last
    run *before* carbo-loading (Wednesday or Thursday morning before breakfast).

    This turns out not to be particularly good value-for-money compared to the tiredness and injury
    risks it can cause. One isolated run doesn't have much effect on the overall enzymes activity.

    Same with the strict "Scandinavian" diet. Not worth the hassle, tiredness and risks, except maybe at
    international level.

    Research by Taylor (1972) showed that the enzymes which is supposed to be stimulated by the
    "exhaustion" run is actually very active already in trained endurance athletes (5 times more than
    sedentary subjects).

    Adolfsson provided more on this by having subjects pedal with only one leg.

    The conclusion was that, for a correctly-trained endurance athlete, 3 days of light training, on
    reduced carb diet, followed by three days light training on high-carb diet was perfectly good
    enough, if not considerably better overall.
     
  11. ahass

    ahass Guest

    > What I am concerned with is that after such a heavy training schedule in the foregoing three
    > months, stopping for two days might lead my body to "shut down". That is what my training partner
    > thinks (he is a 1m 45s 800 metre guy, and knows a thing or two about running).

    --Don't worry! If I race Sat I would take Thurs off and do about 3-4 ridiculously easy miles on Fri
    to loosen out and stretch. I ALWAYS feel like crap the day before a marathon from backing off so
    much, but ALWAYS feel like a prizefighter on the big morning. Andy Hass
     
  12. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Edward wrote:
    >

    > I also thought I read somewhere about the run helping glycogen loading, though I recalled that the
    > run was supposed to be eyeballs-out! So confusing.
    >
    > Edward

    I haven't had time to look for the article in my stack, but sometime (maybe last fall) there was an
    article, probably by Owen Anderson and probably in Running Research News but not sure. My
    recollection was that a 3-min (yes, only 3 min) hard workout reduced glycogen (more so than longer
    less intense runs), and then reload from there. But if you haven't tried it before, now is not the
    time, esp. since there are probably other parts to the article that I can't remember and may be
    essential to the technique.

    Good luck.

    Dot

    --
    "Success is different things to different people" -Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope
     
  13. I agree with what Andy said, and I'll add ...

    If you don't feel restless during your taper, you're not doing it right. If you're worried you're
    not running enough, you're doing it right. If you find yourself having trouble sleeping, you're
    probably doing it right.

    -Keith

    [email protected] wrote:
    >>What I am concerned with is that after such a heavy training schedule in the foregoing three
    >>months, stopping for two days might lead my body to "shut down". That is what my training partner
    >>thinks (he is a 1m 45s 800 metre guy, and knows a thing or two about running).
    >
    >
    > --Don't worry! If I race Sat I would take Thurs off and do about 3-4 ridiculously easy miles on
    > Fri to loosen out and stretch. I ALWAYS feel like crap the day before a marathon from backing off
    > so much, but ALWAYS feel like a prizefighter on the big morning. Andy Hass

    --
    Keith Gemeinhart Technology Service Corp. Sebring, FL
    --
     
  14. Lustig

    Lustig Guest

    steve common <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Same with the strict "Scandinavian" diet. Not worth the hassle, tiredness and risks, except maybe
    > at international level.

    It is also the current "Scandinavian belief" that the (up to 3-day fat-and-protein diet isn´t really
    required and that the exhaustion run need not be harder than 90-120(1) mins at moderate effort.

    However, for some athletes the "old brute method" does bring a better result; it´s just that a goal
    race isn´t the proper time to find out that you are not one of them...

    (1) depending, of course, on the individual training load, but a bit longer than "the average
    training run"

    > The conclusion was that, for a correctly-trained endurance athlete, 3 days of light training, on
    > reduced carb diet, followed by three days light training on high-carb diet was perfectly good
    > enough, if not considerably better overall.

    Quite. If one wants to exeriment, one can then try either the PG- rated - which I`ve found out to
    work for me - or the X-rated Scandinavian stuff.

    Anders
     
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