Least bike-friendly region in U.S.?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mark Smigel, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Mark Smigel

    Mark Smigel Guest

    For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic drivers
    and attitudes?

    I'm not a cyclist (not yet at least), but I've avidly read a few cross-country logs over the years,
    and it seems northern Florida near the coastal bend keeps recurring as a problem area in terms of
    dangerous drivers and cyclist-unfriendly sentiments. Much of Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas seem
    to play runner-up. The contrast is even more surprising when I read about, for example, a trip from
    Little Rock to Wichita... the aura seems to flip 180 degrees for the better about halfway through.

    Also, for what it's worth, I seem to keep stumbling into accounts of dog packs roaming western
    Kentucky -- I guess that area is bad for cycling in?

    Hopefully I'm not broadbrushing too much with this... I'm mostly interested in the patterns I
    keep seeing.

    MJ
     
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  2. Velonut

    Velonut Guest

    IRT cycling northern Florida, I recently rode/drove every inch of Adventure Cycling's Northern Tier.

    The difference in cycling ambience between South Florida & North Florida is rather drastic.

    I must say that north Florida (above I 10) turned out to be overall the most bike friendly areas I
    have encountered in all of Florida. With the exception of a huge bridge makeover north of Pensacola,
    US 90, with a great paved shoulder most of the way, was absolutely great. I can particularly
    recommend the stretch between Milton and Marianna. East of Marianna, the lack of paved shoulders
    means going along back roads north of 90 to get to the bridge over the Chattahoochie River.

    From Chattahoochie to Tallahassee via Quincy there is a back road. Adventure cycling's route thru
    Tallahassee is is also rather easy & sedate.

    Getting from Tallahassee to Monticello is rather roundabout using part of the St Mark's Railtrail.

    Monticello to Madison is a real pleasure as is Madison & all of Madison County. The folks there
    have really gone all out to welcome touring cyclists. It is a shame that there is no bike shop
    in Madison.

    Continuing towards St Augustine from Madison, I turned off 90 and onto SR 6 which took me thru
    Jasper and into White Springs - great ride with a paved shoulder everywhere.

    From White Springs it was delightful back roads (mostly Adventure Cycling's route) to High Springs.
    From High Springs I took the paved shoulder along southbound US 27 into Newberry and then worked my
    way via the AC route to Archer.

    Along the AC route from Archer to Citra via Micanopy the AC route is simply gorgeous, with little
    traffic, plenty of shade and little restaurants along the way.

    The segment from Citra into Palatka was a bit busier and had very little paved shoulder. I was
    singularly unsuccessful in finding a viable alternate to the AC route thru that area.

    However, once in Palatka, you will encounter great roads all the way into St Augustine.

    Enroute I stayed in B&B's in Pensacola, Milton, DeFuniak Springs, Marianna, Quincy, Monticello,
    Madison, White Springs, High Springs, San Mateo (near Palatka) & St Augustine.

    Overall I found the drivers in north Florida (along US 90) to be vastly more bike friendly
    than, say, in the Miami area. However, I have discovered a route thru Miami that keeps me out
    of harms way.

    HTH

    Regards from the Velo Nut

    Dale V Lally Jr W0OWF Pompano Beach FL [email protected]
     
  3. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >Much of Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas seem to play runner-up.

    I have had the opportunity to takes several longer rides in the Tuskegee-Auburn area of Alabama.

    I found the drivers friendly and courteous. Unlike California, where everyone is in a hurry, these
    drivers were content to wait until the road was clear and then slowly pass in the other lane.

    One of my favorite stories occurred near Tuskegee, riding with a friend on a two lane road. Side by
    side in a long sweeping turn, we realized there was a car behind us we were blocking. Immediately I
    pulled ahead and we moved towards the right.

    The car did not pass until we were well past the turn. Then they slowly passed, and as they did, the
    passenger rolled down the window, smiled and said:

    "You all take care now."

    They waved and that was it.

    When the passenger rolled that window down we were expecting (and deserving) the finger. Instead we
    got some good old fashioned hospitality.

    Another time I was lost and asked directions. The fellow told me I was on the right road but be
    careful, down the road a piece I should watch out for his brothers dog.

    Glad I was ready.

    Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs
     
  4. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    [email protected] (Mark Smigel) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > drivers and attitudes?
    >
    > I'm not a cyclist (not yet at least), but I've avidly read a few cross-country logs over the
    > years, and it seems northern Florida near the coastal bend keeps recurring as a problem area in
    > terms of dangerous drivers and cyclist-unfriendly sentiments.

    I have lived in Tallahassee since 1990 and have found the North Florida/South Georgia area to be the
    most bicycle friendly area I have ever ridden.

    > Also, for what it's worth, I seem to keep stumbling into accounts of dog packs roaming western
    > Kentucky -- I guess that area is bad for cycling in?

    I did the Old Kentucky Home Tour last year and, in two days, I saw a total of two unrestrained
    dogs. I grew up in Kentucky and never found the dogs to be a bigger problem than any other place I
    have lived.

    Seems to me that few dogs are really serious about attacking. When I see them coming, I just start
    screaming at them and riding right towards them. They seem to be intimidated

    Dick Durbin Tallahassee
     
  5. Ics

    Ics Guest

    "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    | drivers and attitudes?
    |

    Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.
     
  6. Lincoln Ross

    Lincoln Ross Guest

    I dunno. I live in a red area and see a lot of stupidity and occasional aggression (like screaming,
    yelling stupid things, etc.). I think there's more to it than politics (which in my experience has
    little to do with intelligence.)

    I do know someone who was shot while riding a bicycle in Florida, but I don't remember where and he
    has had it happen before when not on a bike.

    Pooing Is Cool wrote:
    >
    > On 26 Jan 2003 01:33:40 -0800, [email protected] (Mark Smigel) said:
    >
    > >For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > >drivers and attitudes?
    >
    > http://www.uselectionatlas.org/USPRESIDENT/GENERAL/pe2000USA2.gif
    >
    > The blue areas have the worst drivers.
    >
    > --
    >
    > I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

    --
    Lincoln Ross NOTE ADDRESS CHANGE: [email protected]
     
  7. Nearly all the bicycling accidents I read about occur in the red areas....
     
  8. Matt

    Matt Guest

    ICS <[email protected]> wrote in message news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > | For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > | drivers and attitudes?
    > |
    >
    > Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.
    >
    >
    >

    Because in their bigoted ignorance they will make sweeping, unfair generalizations about cyclists?

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    - "Each day is future history. So don't step lightly." --Clive Cussler
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    -
     
  9. Mark Smigel

    Mark Smigel Guest

    [email protected] (Dick Durbin) wrote...
    > I have lived in Tallahassee since 1990 and have found the North Florida/South Georgia area to be
    > the most bicycle friendly area I have

    Cool! Thanks for setting me straight.. I guess the trip logs I read were probably not a
    representative sample, or might have had a bit of personal bias.

    MJ
     
  10. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    "ICS" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<%[email protected]>...
    > "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > | For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > | drivers and attitudes?
    > |
    >
    > Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.

    You will find rednecks anywhere in the US. They just don't all have a Southern accent.

    Dick Durbin Tallahassee
     
  11. On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 03:43:24 GMT, SC Hiker Biker <[email protected]> said:

    >Nearly all the bicycling accidents I read about occur in the red areas....

    But the bicycling "on purposes" occur in the blue areas.

    --

    I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative! ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------
     
  12. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    26 Jan 2003 19:48:08 GMT, <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Jon
    Isaacs) wrote:

    >Unlike California, where everyone is in a hurry, these drivers were content to wait until the road
    >was clear and then slowly pass in the other lane.

    San Diego was just voted the second most polite city in the US.
    --
    zk
     
  13. Ie

    Ie Guest

    I grew up riding in Iowa--pretty darned friendly 'cause the residents all know about RAGBRAI and
    want cyclists to come to their town. Very few rednecks when it comes to cycling.

    On the other hand, Texas (land of the red pickup truck) can really suck. Heck, a few years ago some
    d-head even tried to run Lance over. He pressed charges, and the guy did time. Great victory for
    cyclists but sad statement that a TDF winner is a target on the road in his own home town.

    --
    ie "ride fast, take chances"

    "Dick Durbin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "ICS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<%[email protected]>...
    > > "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > | For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > > | drivers and attitudes?
    > > |
    > >
    > > Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.
    >
    > You will find rednecks anywhere in the US. They just don't all have a Southern accent.
    >
    > Dick Durbin Tallahassee
     
  14. On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 00:39:24 -0500, Matt wrote:

    >> Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.

    > Because in their bigoted ignorance they will make sweeping, unfair generalizations about cyclists?
    >
    Woah, pardner, was that irony I heard?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics, I can _`\(,_ | assure you that mine
    are all greater. -- A. Einstein (_)/ (_) |
     
  15. Jeff Toxey

    Jeff Toxey Guest

    Damn rednecks and their stereotypes! I ride here in Texas and have found the drivers who aren't from
    here to be the worst. Houston is not Texas, don't let that cloud your judgement. Just like every
    place in this world, there are drivers who are cocks and riders who are cocks and the vast majority
    are somewhere in the middle just trying to get where their going whether it's in a car or on a bike.

    "ie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I grew up riding in Iowa--pretty darned friendly 'cause the residents all know about RAGBRAI and
    > want cyclists to come to their town. Very few rednecks when it comes to cycling.
    >
    > On the other hand, Texas (land of the red pickup truck) can really suck. Heck, a few years ago
    > some d-head even tried to run Lance over. He
    pressed
    > charges, and the guy did time. Great victory for cyclists but sad
    statement
    > that a TDF winner is a target on the road in his own home town.
    >
    > --
    > ie "ride fast, take chances"
    >
    >
    > "Dick Durbin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "ICS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<%[email protected]>...
    > > > "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > | For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > > > | drivers and attitudes?
    > > > |
    > > >
    > > > Anywhere you find cowboys and rednecks is a bad place to ride a bike.
    > >
    > > You will find rednecks anywhere in the US. They just don't all have a Southern accent.
    > >
    > > Dick Durbin Tallahassee
     
  16. "Mark Smigel" <[email protected]>
    > For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > drivers and attitudes?

    Any region that the vehicle of choice is an SUV with the driver taking the kids to soccer practice
    with a cell phone glued to her/his ear.

    Regards,
     
  17. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "JEFF TOXEY" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Damn rednecks and their stereotypes! I ride here in Texas and have found the drivers who aren't
    > from here to be the worst. Houston is not Texas, don't let that cloud your judgement. Just like
    > every place in this world, there are drivers who are cocks and riders who are cocks and the vast
    > majority are somewhere in the middle just trying to get where their going whether it's in a car or
    > on a bike.

    It's ALWAYS the drivers who are 'not from here' who are the worst.

    Everybody else sucks, and I'm great.

    Pete
     
  18. Phil Hughes

    Phil Hughes Guest

    [email protected] (Mark Smigel) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > For those who ride rural and main routes... which part of the U.S. has the most problematic
    > drivers and attitudes?
    >
    > I'm not a cyclist (not yet at least), but I've avidly read a few cross-country logs over the
    > years, and it seems northern Florida near the coastal bend keeps recurring as a problem area in
    > terms of dangerous drivers and cyclist-unfriendly sentiments. Much of Mississippi, Alabama, and
    > Arkansas seem to play runner-up. The contrast is even more surprising when I read about, for
    > example, a trip from Little Rock to Wichita... the aura seems to flip 180 degrees for the better
    > about halfway through.
    >
    > Also, for what it's worth, I seem to keep stumbling into accounts of dog packs roaming western
    > Kentucky -- I guess that area is bad for cycling in?
    >
    > Hopefully I'm not broadbrushing too much with this... I'm mostly interested in the patterns I
    > keep seeing.
    >
    > MJ

    Do not, Repeat, Do not ever try to ride your bike through Jacksonville, Florida, You will
    not make it.
     
  19. Phil wrote:>Do not, Repeat, Do not ever try to ride your bike through
    >Jacksonville, Florida, You will not make it.

    I grew up here in Jacksonville, Florida and rode my bike almost every day as a kid. Since I moved
    back here 3.5 years ago I have ridden all over this city and its outskirts. While Jax might not be
    *the* most bike-friendly place in the world, it's hardly suicidal to ride here. Just my$0.02.
    BTW-I'm planning to take a bit of a ride later this afternoon. It's about 75 F outside and
    sunny-perfect weather.

    Cheers, Tzahi Ben-Moshe

    Elen sila lumenn' omentielvo!
     
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