my bike was stolen and ...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Higb, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. Higb

    Higb Guest

    I'm thinking over what to get as a replacement. I started mountain biking in the 80's and rode 3
    rigid frame bikes before shocks showed up. Considering what I like (excercise, climbs, conservative
    downhill), I'll probably replace the stolen hardtail with another hardtail (Stumpjumper or
    Stumpjumper Comp).

    I'd appreciate some input on that, but here's the funny part ... until I decide, I figure I'll get
    some excercise (been a very occaisional rider for the past few years) by taking my old rigid bike
    down to the local trails. At 23 pounds, it handles rough stuff better than a heavy rigid at least.

    But it seems really weird now, like I shouldn't be able to ride a rigid bike out there ... but I
    did, heck I covered every trail out there a dozen times ... back when rigid bikes were the norm.

    It's going to be embarassing, taking it out of the car

    higb
     
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  2. higb wrote:

    > But it seems really weird now, like I shouldn't be able to ride a rigid bike out there ... but I
    > did, heck I covered every trail out there a dozen times ... back when rigid bikes were the norm.

    Get a Single Speed

    > It's going to be embarassing, taking it out of the car

    Why? Who cares what you ride as long as you ride. (Unless it's a Wal*goose of K-Huffy, etc.)
     
  3. Botchka

    Botchka Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 14:51:11 GMT, higb wrote:

    > I'm thinking over what to get as a replacement. I started mountain biking in the 80's and rode 3
    > rigid frame bikes before shocks showed up. Considering what I like (excercise, climbs,
    > conservative downhill), I'll probably replace the stolen hardtail with another hardtail
    > (Stumpjumper or Stumpjumper Comp).
    >
    > I'd appreciate some input on that, but here's the funny part ... until I decide, I figure I'll get
    > some excercise (been a very occaisional rider for the past few years) by taking my old rigid bike
    > down to the local trails. At 23 pounds, it handles rough stuff better than a heavy rigid at least.
    >
    > But it seems really weird now, like I shouldn't be able to ride a rigid bike out there ... but I
    > did, heck I covered every trail out there a dozen times ... back when rigid bikes were the norm.
    >
    > It's going to be embarassing, taking it out of the car
    >
    > higb

    I wouldn't be embarrassed at all. Hard to believe that a rigid bike would be considered 'retro'
    nowadays. Full Suspension is for people who can't handle a rigid anyway. :eek:) Maybe they'll think
    that you are super hard-core and idolize you...

    Greg
    --
    http://www.treelimb.org/ A blogunity
     
  4. >higb wrote:

    >> It's going to be embarassing, taking it out of the car

    It's not _what_ you ride, it's _how_ you ride it!

    Even beginners get respect from me when they flat out give it all they've got on a not so hot bike.

    Try, try, and try some more. If the folks you don't ride with don't understand, find new people to
    ride with.

    Barry
     
  5. higb, I have always ridden arigid bike, and feel no fear removing it from the car. I'm not the
    world's best rider, but I can usually manage to get the bike through most stuff (and walk the rest).
    It's fun to watch the full sus guys overestimate the power of their sus sytems and come flying off.
    ;-) Screw the rest of 'em, ride what you want.

    Steve
     
  6. Higb

    Higb Guest

    Thanks all, I guess it says something about shifting perspectives ... that I see shocks often enough
    that I forget what we used to do without them.

    Now I just need to see if I cam reclaim the old skill set ;-)

    higb
     
  7. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 14:51:11 GMT, higb <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm thinking over what to get as a replacement. I started mountain biking in the 80's and rode 3
    >rigid frame bikes before shocks showed up. Considering what I like (excercise, climbs, conservative
    >downhill), I'll probably replace the stolen hardtail with another hardtail (Stumpjumper or
    >Stumpjumper Comp).

    I hear they're very solid bikes. I tested on in a parking lot, ... felt nice.

    >
    >I'd appreciate some input on that, but here's the funny part ... until I decide, I figure I'll get
    >some excercise (been a very occaisional rider for the past few years) by taking my old rigid bike
    >down to the local trails. At 23 pounds, it handles rough stuff better than a heavy rigid at least.
    >
    >But it seems really weird now, like I shouldn't be able to ride a rigid bike out there ... but I
    >did, heck I covered every trail out there a dozen times ... back when rigid bikes were the norm.

    You've been tricked into thinking there's something more to MTBing. Welcome back!.

    >
    >It's going to be embarassing, taking it out of the car

    Then don't take it out of the car, ride it to the trails.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  8. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 22 Jun 2003 01:05:26 GMT, [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:

    >higb, I have always ridden arigid bike, and feel no fear removing it from the car. I'm not the
    >world's best rider, but I can usually manage to get the bike through most stuff (and walk the
    >rest). It's fun to watch the full sus guys overestimate the power of their sus sytems and come
    >flying off. ;-) Screw the rest of 'em, ride what you want.
    >
    >Steve

    I'm really liking what I see in this thread. Hard to believe that there are people out there who are
    actually shunning Overkill-techno-FS rigs.

    What a great world we live in!

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  9. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On 23 Jun 2003 02:41:05 GMT, [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:

    >Bill W says:
    >
    >>I'm really liking what I see in this thread. Hard to believe that there are people out there who
    >>are actually shunning Overkill-techno-FS rigs.
    >>
    >>What a great world we live in!
    >
    >So...... you finally pulled your head out of your ....... SS (phew!) long enough to notice you
    >aren't alone? Welcome back ;-P
    >
    >Steve

    It was getting pretty stuffy in there I must say.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
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