My tacoed rear wheel..

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by kh6zv9, Apr 18, 2003.

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  1. kh6zv9

    kh6zv9 Guest

    A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after breaking one lousy spoke.

    The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than 500
    miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.

    While coming down a steep curvy mountain grade ( I was using my brakes a lot ) , I popped a drive
    side spoke (right side), and my wheel immediately tacoed and was trashed beyond repair.

    I had to walk carrying the bike.

    I can only suspect that I had built the wheel to tight.

    The reason the spoke broke was from Chain Damage a few rides before when the chain jumped in between
    the spokes and the cassette causing damage to all of my leading spokes.

    Any thoughts on this are appreciated.

    --------------------------------
    Bob Masse' [email protected]
    --------------------------------
     
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  2. Dion Dock

    Dion Dock Guest

    The little plastic "ring" that goes between the cassette and the spokes will prevent the chain from
    going there again. The other alternative is to often check the rear derailleur limit screws to make
    sure they don't shift into the rear wheel.

    Where did your spoke break? Where the chain gouged it or at the end where its "elbow" went into the
    hub? If it was from chain damage, you will need to replace the damaged spokes sooner. If it was at
    the elbow, the wheel was not stress relieved.

    It's unlikely the spokes were "too tight". The problem that leads to is they pull right
    through the rim.

    -Dion

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after breaking one lousy spoke.
    >
    > The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than 500
    > miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.
    >
    > While coming down a steep curvy mountain grade ( I was using my brakes a lot ) , I popped a drive
    > side spoke (right side), and my wheel immediately tacoed and was trashed beyond repair.
    >
    > I had to walk carrying the bike.
    >
    > I can only suspect that I had built the wheel to tight.
    >
    > The reason the spoke broke was from Chain Damage a few rides before when the chain jumped in
    > between the spokes and the cassette causing damage to all of my leading spokes.
    >
    > Any thoughts on this are appreciated.
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------
    > Bob Masse' [email protected]
    > --------------------------------
    >
    >
     
  3. Woogoogle

    Woogoogle Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after breaking one lousy spoke.
    >
    > The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than 500
    > miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.
    >
    At your weight and probable strength, you may need a wheel with more spokes like tandem wheels? I've
    had a super light weight rear wheel buckle underneath me at 155#, but that was prolly cause it was
    under tensioned or had some loose spokes after a couple of years of service.
     
  4. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after breaking one lousy spoke.
    >
    > The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than 500
    > miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.

    You don't mention what particular rim is was, or what wheel size. You don't mention whether this was
    on- or off-road. The rim may have been too light for the application, but there's not enough data
    here to tell.

    > While coming down a steep curvy mountain grade ( I was using my brakes a lot ) , I popped a drive
    > side spoke (right side), and my wheel immediately tacoed and was trashed beyond repair.

    The right side spokes are under twice the tension of those on the left. They are pulled so flat that
    side loads apply large fluctuations in tension to these spokes. It's an inevitable side effect of
    having 8, 9, or 10 speeds crammed into 130mm or 135mm rear spacing.

    Were you staying centered over the bike, or hanging your body off to the inside or outside of the
    turn? If you don't stay centered over the bike, you cause unnecessary side loads on the wheels.

    > I can only suspect that I had built the wheel to tight.

    That's not it. If the spoke broke at the elbow, then it was probably a faulty build, with
    insufficient stress relieving. Oddly, breaking spokes is not a symptom of a too-tight build (usually
    it's the opposite).

    > The reason the spoke broke was from Chain Damage a few rides before when the chain jumped in
    > between the spokes and the cassette causing damage to all of my leading spokes.

    If the spoke broke at the point of chain damage, then it may well have broken from an overload.

    I have to observe that it's none too surprising if a 250 pounder honking down a mountain road,
    side-loading a ridiculously dished rear wheel with chain-damaged spokes, were to suffer a spoke
    failure. If this spoke were to fail while being side loaded, it's none too surprising if the same
    force that broke the spoke were to bend the wheel beyond repairability.

    Not all these conditions may apply in your particular case.

    Things you can do in the future to prevent recurrences include:

    Use a spoke protector Build a dishless rear wheel with an offset rim and low dish hub Tension the
    drive side spokes to 100-120kgf Properly stress relieve your spokes with a momentary overload Use a
    heavier rim Use butted spokes, 13/14ga or 14/15ga right, 14/15ga or 15/16ga left Don't side load
    your wheels unnecessarily

    Good luck addressing your problem.

    Chalo Colina
     
  5. Tauras

    Tauras Guest

    Indeed more spokes the better, I bought my 8 year old a Haro BMX with 44 spokes per 20 inch wide
    style rim. I can't believe the abuse I'm able to try to do to it a 200 lbs and 6'4", those pegs
    are fun =)

    Tauras http://www.kcbx.net/~tsulaiti/surfreport/

    "WooGoogle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after
    breaking
    > > one lousy spoke.
    > >
    > > The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than
    > > 500 miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.
    > >
    > At your weight and probable strength, you may need a wheel with more spokes like tandem wheels?
    > I've had a super light weight rear wheel buckle underneath me at 155#, but that was prolly cause
    > it was under tensioned or had some loose spokes after a couple of years of service.

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  6. bball

    bball Guest

    I had a similar taco experience last fall also with a 36h Araya rim, 700c after re-tightening the
    wheel excessively. (Early and enthusiastic attempts with a new truing stand.) Mine tacoed after a
    brief downhill and turn onto the flats. No broken spoke but the tire came off the bead, tube emerged
    and exploded. Fortunately I had a spoke wrench and spare tube, was on my way in short order. The
    wheel re-trued and I learned my rudimentary lesson of not too tight.

    Pride (and gung-ho with a spoke wrench) leadeth to a fall.

    Beware the wheel singing soprano.

    Bruce Ball
    --------

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 15:29:20 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >A few weeks ago I had a catastrophic failure on a rear rim after breaking one lousy spoke.
    >
    >The rim was a 36 hole Araya 700c rim. Double wall and double eyelets. The wheel had less than 500
    >miles on it. I was using 14 straight gauge wheelsmith spokes. I weigh 250 pounds.
    >
    >While coming down a steep curvy mountain grade ( I was using my brakes a lot ) , I popped a drive
    >side spoke (right side), and my wheel immediately tacoed and was trashed beyond repair.
    >
    >I had to walk carrying the bike.
    >
    >I can only suspect that I had built the wheel to tight.
    >
    >The reason the spoke broke was from Chain Damage a few rides before when the chain jumped in
    >between the spokes and the cassette causing damage to all of my leading spokes.
    >
    >Any thoughts on this are appreciated.
    >
    >
    > --------------------------------
    > Bob Masse' [email protected]
    >--------------------------------
    >
     
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