Preparing for a 5k run

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Ignoramus28400, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km (measured
    approximately with a truck odometer) as fast as I could, in
    preparation for the upcoming 5k run on April 25.

    The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The terrain
    was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it would be
    24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it seems like
    finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty possible at my
    today's level. I have a little over a month to train.

    My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run as
    often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week? Should
    I also do shorter distance sprints? Should I rest for a week
    or so immediately prior to the race?

    Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying new
    ones for $70 or so help me in any way?

    i
     
    Tags:


  2. Beverly

    Beverly Guest

    "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    > (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    > as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    > April 25.
    >
    > The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    > terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    > would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    > seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    > possible at my today's level. I have a little over a month
    > to train.
    >
    > My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run
    > as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week?
    > Should I also do shorter distance sprints? Should I rest
    > for a week or so immediately prior to the race?
    >
    > Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying
    > new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?
    >
    > i

    http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55-
    638,FF.html?site=RunnersWorld

    Here's a training schedule from www.runnersworld.com that
    might help.

    You certainly want to get new shoes. Get them now and get
    them broke in before the race.

    Congratulations on deciding to do a 5K. With your current
    times you should do just fine.

    Beverly
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Beverly wrote:
    >
    > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    >> as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    >> April 25.
    >>
    >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    >> terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    >> would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    >> seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    >> possible at my today's level. I have a little over a
    >> month to train.
    >>
    >> My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run
    >> as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week?
    >> Should I also do shorter distance sprints? Should I rest
    >> for a week or so immediately prior to the race?
    >>
    >> Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying
    >> new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?
    >>
    >> i
    >
    > http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55-
    > 638,FF.html?site=RunnersWorld
    >
    > Here's a training schedule from www.runnersworld.com that
    > might help.
    >
    > You certainly want to get new shoes. Get them now and get
    > them broke in before the race.
    >
    > Congratulations on deciding to do a 5K. With your current
    > times you should do just fine.

    Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but I
    get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I cannot run
    every day.

    i
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Ignoramus28400 wrote:
    > I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    > (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    > as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    > April 25.
    >
    > The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    > terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    > would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    > seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    > possible at my today's level.

    That's very approximate (-; You may do better on the race,
    but it's always a good idea to try to start slow. It's easy
    to end up going faster than you think, the race setting
    tends to make you run faster. So you'll need to use a lot of
    restraint at the start.

    > I have a little over a month to train.

    That's not long at all, so don't do anything too radical.

    > My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run
    > as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week?

    Just keep doing what you've been doing. A big increase in
    volume is probably counterproductive at this stage. If you
    had two months, doing one month at a higher volume, followed
    by an easier month may help.

    > Should I also do shorter distance sprints?

    It's too late to start heavy interval work, but a little
    sharpening may help. Your best bet would be to add some
    strides to the end of your runs. Do these as follows:
    gradually accelerate, until you're running pretty quickly,
    and hold the pace for 10 seconds or so. You shouldn't be
    pushing hard, you want to focus on a getting a good turnover
    rate, and they should feel light, fast, and not too
    stressful.

    > Should I rest for a week or so immediately prior to
    > the race?

    Maybe the day before the race.

    > Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying
    > new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?

    Yes, it would.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, Ignoramus28400 wrote:

    > Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but I
    > get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I cannot
    > run every day.

    I don't understand this remark. Do you believe that you'll
    injure your knees if you run every day ? Or did you mean
    something else ? I doubt that frequency of training is much
    of a predictor of injury, but feel free to prove my doubts
    ill-founded.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  6. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    > (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    > as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    > April 25.
    >
    > The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    > terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    > would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    > seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    > possible at my today's level. I have a little over a month
    > to train.
    >
    > My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run
    > as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week?
    > Should I also do shorter distance sprints? Should I rest
    > for a week or so immediately prior to the race?

    My thoughts would be that if you've only been running 1 or 2
    times a week up until now, you might want to increase your
    frequency slightly over the next couple of weeks and then
    hold it there. If you've been running 3-5 times a week (I
    assume that you run the same ~3 mile loop each time you
    run?) I'd maintain that same volume. Most of your days
    should be "easy" days (9:30
    min/mi or so, I'd think?--whatever pace you can maintain
    steadily without getting out of breath, and not feel
    exhausted at the end/muscle sore the next day). Ideally,
    you'd want one run a week that was a little longer (and
    as slow as you need to go to finish comfortably) and one
    run a week that had bursts of greater intensity
    interspersed with easy recovery periods.

    Don't increase your volume by more than 10% a week, and
    don't increase it at all in the last couple of weeks before
    the race (indeed, in the last week before the race, taper
    off slightly). Finally, don't increase your volume in the
    same week that you increase intensity (by adding some
    workouts incorporating shorter stretches of faster running).

    In other words, you don't really have a lot of time to
    improve for this particular race, but if you are interested
    in continuing, those are thoughts to keep in mind.

    The general principal on building speed into your training
    is that you never want to run as fast as you'll run a race,
    for the complete distance you'll run the race.

    > Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying
    > new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?

    Fresh comfy running shoes that are right for YOU will do
    more to save your knees than just about anything else. And I
    know this is a concern of yours, you bad, bad boy. No wonder
    you had knee problems when you ran before! 12 miles a week
    on crappy shoes was harder on my joints than 25 miles a week
    on good shoes. "Good shoes" does not just mean "expensive,"
    though. The wrong expensive shoes will make you miserable.
    Go to a store that specializes in running wear (not a mall
    store, not a big-box sporting goods store, but a small
    running store.) Find one that offers gait analysis, and they
    will help you sort through the zillions of models and find
    the ones that fit your needs, and not just your feet.

    The other things that will help keep you running happily for
    years and reduce the chance of injury are to run most of
    your mileage in the "easy" zone, don't increase mileage too
    quickly, and don't stupidly "run through" any chronic pains.

    Gotta run!
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Ignoramus28400 wrote:
    >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    >> as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    >> April 25.
    >>
    >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    >> terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    >> would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    >> seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    >> possible at my today's level.
    >
    > That's very approximate (-; You may do better on the race,
    > but it's always a good idea to try to start slow. It's
    > easy to end up going faster than you think, the race
    > setting tends to make you run faster. So you'll need to
    > use a lot of restraint at the start.

    Thanks for this and other suggestions. A further question.
    When I ran, I felt pain at the bottom of my right lung and
    near my right collar bone.

    It is not the first time and it happens when I run fast and
    long. Is that bad for me?

    i
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Ignoramus28400 wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but I
    >> get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I cannot
    >> run every day.
    >
    > I don't understand this remark. Do you believe that you'll
    > injure your knees if you run every day ? Or did you mean
    > something else ? I doubt that frequency of training is
    > much of a predictor of injury, but feel free to prove my
    > doubts ill-founded.
    >

    I have been running (jogging) for about 18 years, since the
    age of 12 or so. My mom mae me run to help with my asthma,
    which worked beautifully.

    Unfortunately, my knees are a bit worn out and if I run
    every day, I feel pain in my knees. After a day of rest or
    so, I can run painlessly again. I take
    glucosamine/chondroitin lately, and it helps a bit, but
    anyway, I would not want to run every day. I walk every day.

    i
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, DrLith wrote:
    > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    >> as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    >> April 25.
    >>
    >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    >> terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it
    >> would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it
    >> seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    >> possible at my today's level. I have a little over a
    >> month to train.
    >>
    >> My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I run
    >> as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per week?
    >> Should I also do shorter distance sprints? Should I rest
    >> for a week or so immediately prior to the race?
    >
    > My thoughts would be that if you've only been running 1 or
    > 2 times a week up until now, you might want to increase
    > your frequency slightly over the next couple of weeks and
    > then hold it there. If you've been running 3-5 times a
    > week (I assume that you run the same ~3 mile loop each
    > time you run?) I'd maintain that same volume. Most of your
    > days should be "easy" days (9:30
    > min/mi or so, I'd think?--whatever pace you can maintain
    > steadily without getting out of breath, and not feel
    > exhausted at the end/muscle sore the next day).
    > Ideally, you'd want one run a week that was a little
    > longer (and as slow as you need to go to finish
    > comfortably) and one run a week that had bursts of
    > greater intensity interspersed with easy recovery
    > periods.
    >
    > Don't increase your volume by more than 10% a week, and
    > don't increase it at all in the last couple of weeks
    > before the race (indeed, in the last week before the race,
    > taper off slightly). Finally, don't increase your volume
    > in the same week that you increase intensity (by adding
    > some workouts incorporating shorter stretches of faster
    > running).
    >
    > In other words, you don't really have a lot of time to
    > improve for this particular race, but if you are
    > interested in continuing, those are thoughts to keep
    > in mind.
    >
    > The general principal on building speed into your training
    > is that you never want to run as fast as you'll run a
    > race, for the complete distance you'll run the race.

    Thanks. I think that my main purpose is to learn to optimize
    whatever resources I have, during the race. I also tend to
    forget to run fast, as strange as it sounds, and caught
    myself slowing down several times, even though I could run
    faster. Maybe it sounds weird, but it is true. I am
    generally a slow paced person.

    >> Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would buying
    >> new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?
    >
    > Fresh comfy running shoes that are right for YOU will do
    > more to save your knees than just about anything else. And
    > I know this is a concern of yours, you bad, bad boy. No
    > wonder you had knee problems when you ran before! 12 miles
    > a week on crappy shoes was harder on my joints than 25
    > miles a week on good shoes. "Good shoes" does not just
    > mean "expensive," though. The wrong expensive shoes will
    > make you miserable. Go to a store that specializes in
    > running wear (not a mall store, not a big-box sporting
    > goods store, but a small running store.) Find one that
    > offers gait analysis, and they will help you sort through
    > the zillions of models and find the ones that fit your
    > needs, and not just your feet.

    Thanks, will do.

    > The other things that will help keep you running happily
    > for years and reduce the chance of injury are to run most
    > of your mileage in the "easy" zone, don't increase
    > mileage too quickly, and don't stupidly "run through" any
    > chronic pains.

    I never run through chronic pain Dr. A lesson I thankfully
    learned from this newsgroup and websites.

    i
     
  10. Drlith

    Drlith Guest

    "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Beverly wrote:
    > >
    > > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    > >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    > >> as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    > >> April 25.
    > >>
    > >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    > >> terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis,
    > >> it would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue,
    > >> it seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is
    > >> pretty possible at my today's level. I have a little
    > >> over a month to train.
    > >>
    > >> My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I
    > >> run as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per
    > >> week? Should I also do shorter distance sprints? Should
    > >> I rest for a week or so immediately prior to the race?
    > >>
    > >> Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would
    > >> buying new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?
    > >>
    > >> i
    > >
    > >
    http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55-
    638,FF.html?site=RunnersWorl d
    > >
    > > Here's a training schedule from www.runnersworld.com
    > > that might help.
    > >
    > > You certainly want to get new shoes. Get them now and
    > > get them broke in before the race.
    > >
    > > Congratulations on deciding to do a 5K. With your
    > > current times you
    should
    > > do just fine.
    >
    > Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but I
    > get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I cannot
    > run every day.

    Beverly perhaps did not notice the part whereas this
    particular training schedule is designed for "advanced
    runners" who are probably already running at least 25 miles
    a week and have 6 weeks to prepare, whereas this is your
    first 5k, and you have 4 weeks remaining, and I'm going to
    guess that you run 10-15 miles a week currently.
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, DrLith wrote:
    > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Beverly wrote:
    >> >
    >> > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    >> > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    >> >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as fast
    >> >> as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k run on
    >> >> April 25.
    >> >>
    >> >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    >> >> terrain was mildly hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis,
    >> >> it would be 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue,
    >> >> it seems like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is
    >> >> pretty possible at my today's level. I have a little
    >> >> over a month to train.
    >> >>
    >> >> My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I
    >> >> run as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x per
    >> >> week? Should I also do shorter distance sprints?
    >> >> Should I rest for a week or so immediately prior to
    >> >> the race?
    >> >>
    >> >> Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would
    >> >> buying new ones for $70 or so help me in any way?
    >> >>
    >> >> i
    >> >
    >> >
    > http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55-
    > 638,FF.html?site=RunnersWorl d
    >> >
    >> > Here's a training schedule from www.runnersworld.com
    >> > that might help.
    >> >
    >> > You certainly want to get new shoes. Get them now and
    >> > get them broke in before the race.
    >> >
    >> > Congratulations on deciding to do a 5K. With your
    >> > current times you
    > should
    >> > do just fine.
    >>
    >> Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but I
    >> get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I cannot
    >> run every day.
    >
    > Beverly perhaps did not notice the part whereas this
    > particular training schedule is designed for "advanced
    > runners" who are probably already running at least 25
    > miles a week and have 6 weeks to prepare, whereas this is
    > your first 5k, and you have 4 weeks remaining, and I'm
    > going to guess that you run 10-15 miles a week currently.
    >
    >

    I was not running for a few weeks due to ice, but regularly,
    I run 2-3x per week.

    i
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Ignoramus28400 wrote:

    >> That's very approximate (-; You may do better on the
    >> race, but it's always a good idea to try to start slow.
    >> It's easy to end up going faster than you think, the race
    >> setting tends to make you run faster. So you'll need to
    >> use a lot of restraint at the start.
    >
    > Thanks for this and other suggestions. A further question.
    > When I ran, I felt pain at the bottom of my right lung and
    > near my right collar bone.
    >
    > It is not the first time and it happens when I run fast
    > and long. Is that bad for me?

    I don't know what it is. It's not necessarily reason to
    panic, but it is worth asking a doctor about (well to me it
    is anyway, since I don't know what it is, and it sounds
    worthy of attention).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  13. > Thanks for this and other suggestions. A further question.
    > When I ran, I felt pain at the bottom of my right lung and
    > near my right collar bone.
    >
    > It is not the first time and it happens when I run fast
    > and long. Is that bad for me?

    Probably not. When you run hard, your diaphragm gets tired,
    like any other muscle. Because of the way the nerves to the
    diaphragm are wired, he body can be tricked into thinking
    that the pain in the diaphragm is also in the shoulder.

    If you are worried about it, see a doctor.

    D
     
  14. Beverly

    Beverly Guest

    "DrLith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Beverly wrote:
    > > >
    > > > "Ignoramus28400" <[email protected]>
    > > > wrote in
    message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >> I just ran my customary jogging distance of 4.54km
    > > >> (measured approximately with a truck odometer) as
    > > >> fast as I could, in preparation for the upcoming 5k
    > > >> run on April 25.
    > > >>
    > > >> The result is 22m34s, or 8.04 minutes per mile. The
    > > >> terrain was
    mildly
    > > >> hilly (two hills). On the 5k basis, it would be
    > > >> 24m48s. Let's add 12 seconds for fatigue, it seems
    > > >> like finishing a 5k race in 25 minutes is pretty
    > > >> possible at my today's level. I have a little over a
    > > >> month to train.
    > > >>
    > > >> My question is how to prepare for the race. Should I
    > > >> run as often as possible, or no more than 2x or 1x
    > > >> per week? Should I also do
    shorter
    > > >> distance sprints? Should I rest for a week or so
    > > >> immediately prior
    to
    > > >> the race?
    > > >>
    > > >> Also, I have old dilapidated running shoes. Would
    > > >> buying new ones
    for
    > > >> $70 or so help me in any way?
    > > >>
    > > >> i
    > > >
    > > >
    >
    http://www.runnersworld.com/home/0,1300,1-51-55-
    638,FF.html?site=RunnersWor l
    > d
    > > >
    > > > Here's a training schedule from www.runnersworld.com
    > > > that might help.
    > > >
    > > > You certainly want to get new shoes. Get them now and
    > > > get them broke
    in
    > > > before the race.
    > > >
    > > > Congratulations on deciding to do a 5K. With your
    > > > current times you
    > should
    > > > do just fine.
    > >
    > > Thanks Beverly, the schedule seems kinda demanding, but
    > > I get the idea. I have to save my knees also, so I
    > > cannot run every day.
    >
    > Beverly perhaps did not notice the part whereas this
    > particular training schedule is designed for "advanced
    > runners" who are probably already
    running
    > at least 25 miles a week and have 6 weeks to prepare,
    > whereas this is
    your
    > first 5k, and you have 4 weeks remaining, and I'm going to
    > guess that you run 10-15 miles a week currently.
    >
    >
    Beverly did notice.... Ig has been running for quite
    sometime so he's not new to it. He ran as a child and still
    continues to run.
     
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