Prone Row?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by The Crow, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. The Crow

    The Crow Guest

    When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    head?

    I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    mean.

    If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your unsupported
    neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you can't put your
    face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the bench either.

    What do you think?
     
    Tags:


  2. spodosaurus

    spodosaurus Guest

    The Crow wrote:
    > When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    > head?
    >
    > I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    > mean.
    >
    > If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your unsupported
    > neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you can't put your
    > face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the bench either.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    >


    Find what works for you, but yeah, don't turn your head to one side or
    the other.
     
  3. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    > head?
    >
    > I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    > mean.
    >
    > If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your unsupported
    > neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you can't put your
    > face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the bench either.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    >


    If your neck muscles strain that easily that they can't support your
    head in a prone position you had better start working them.

    --
    Keith
     
  4. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    > head?
    >
    > I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    > mean.
    >
    > If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    > unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    > can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    > bench either.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >


    When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage on
    the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press bar
    was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up past the
    bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two into my
    chest.

    The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    head on the bench sideways. And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries
    in two auto accidents. So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck
    stress using this bench.

    I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says, if
    this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be strengthened.

    Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole (or
    face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit all
    people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting your face
    in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.

    Chiropractor's benches have a little paper dispenser on the side to pull out
    some paper to cover the face supports.

    But if you were making something for yourself, this could work. When I get
    the time and access to tools, I will be doing this project. Actually this
    will be part of a larger ideal rowing bench project. I think that rowing is
    better done on a bench that the legs drop down from being in line with the
    back. And a few other features as well.
     
  5. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:38:17 -0000, "The Crow"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >head?
    >
    >I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >mean.
    >
    >If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your unsupported
    >neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you can't put your
    >face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the bench either.
    >
    >What do you think?
    >


    There should be no reason why you can't put your head over the end of
    the bench, as it is unwise to turn the head. Just relax and hold the
    head and neck in a natural position or straight, without pushing the
    head back and causing the neck to flex. Look down to the floor as you
    come up to keep yourself in the right position.

    You may care to try this exercise on an exercise ball, which is how I
    do them, which is really very comfortable and has the added benefit of
    incorporating the stablizers.

    See:
    http://www.australianultra-fit.com/bells_and_balls/bells_and_balls.htm
    http://www.sissel-online.com/exercise/pr-rw_exercise_ball_power_weight.php

    HTH
     
  6. spodosaurus

    spodosaurus Guest

    Lee Michaels wrote:
    > "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >>head?
    >>
    >>I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >>mean.
    >>
    >>If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    >>unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    >>can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    >>bench either.
    >>
    >>What do you think?
    >>

    >
    >
    > When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    > middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    > advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage on
    > the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press bar
    > was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up past the
    > bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two into my
    > chest.
    >
    > The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    > head on the bench sideways.


    Why? I have a very similar setup (sans the cambered bar and add a folded
    blanket on top of the wooden bench) and simply held my nose off the
    bench. You should be strong enough to hold your spine in a position
    where your collarbones are well off the bench, and unless you've been
    lying an awful lot your nose won't get squished that way either.

    > And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries
    > in two auto accidents. So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck
    > stress using this bench.
    >
    > I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    > better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says, if
    > this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be strengthened.


    And your upper back muscles, too, if you can't keep your head and neck
    off the bench in the first place.

    >
    > Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    > massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole (or
    > face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit all
    > people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting your face
    > in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.


    There's no need. Tilt your head back a little bit and let your chin
    touch the bench. If your nose is really that big you should consider
    plastic surgery before you try and kiss anyone.

    Joking aside, I have this sort of setup for my power rack. A board, the
    edges rounded with a router, and a bit of 1x2 attached fore and aft
    within the pins to prevent the bench rolling off the pins. I did not
    need to turn my head side to side, even when I was significantly smaller
    than I am now. I held my head back a little bit, and kept the muscles
    supporting my thoracic spine tight so as not to hunch forward and bury
    my face in the bench. I'm having trouble picturing your difficulty.
    Perhaps a more detailed description or a FULLY CLOTHED jpeg might help...
     
  7. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "spodosaurus" wrote
    > Lee Michaels wrote:
    >> "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >>>head?
    >>>
    >>>I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >>>mean.
    >>>
    >>>If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    >>>unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    >>>can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    >>>bench either.
    >>>
    >>>What do you think?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    >> middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    >> advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage
    >> on the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press
    >> bar was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up
    >> past the bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two
    >> into my chest.
    >>
    >> The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    >> head on the bench sideways.

    >
    > Why? I have a very similar setup (sans the cambered bar and add a folded
    > blanket on top of the wooden bench) and simply held my nose off the bench.
    > You should be strong enough to hold your spine in a position where your
    > collarbones are well off the bench, and unless you've been lying an awful
    > lot your nose won't get squished that way either.
    >


    As I pointed out, I have had extensive neckinjuries that complicat this for
    me. As for keeping the clavicles off the bench, this is no problem as I have
    a barrel chest.


    >> And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries in two auto accidents.
    >> So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck stress using this bench.
    >>
    >> I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    >> better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says,
    >> if this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be
    >> strengthened.

    >
    > And your upper back muscles, too, if you can't keep your head and neck off
    > the bench in the first place.
    >
    >>
    >> Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    >> massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole
    >> (or face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit
    >> all people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting
    >> your face in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.

    >
    > There's no need. Tilt your head back a little bit and let your chin touch
    > the bench. If your nose is really that big you should consider plastic
    > surgery before you try and kiss anyone.
    >
    > Joking aside, I have this sort of setup for my power rack. A board, the
    > edges rounded with a router, and a bit of 1x2 attached fore and aft within
    > the pins to prevent the bench rolling off the pins. I did not need to turn
    > my head side to side, even when I was significantly smaller than I am now.
    > I held my head back a little bit, and kept the muscles supporting my
    > thoracic spine tight so as not to hunch forward and bury my face in the
    > bench. I'm having trouble picturing your difficulty. Perhaps a more
    > detailed description or a FULLY CLOTHED jpeg might help...
    >

    What can I say? I grab the bar and if my face is pointed down, my neck
    hurts. The way my bench is supported does not allow me to put my face over
    the end of the bench. By going to another bench where my face extends beyond
    the bench, the problem is solved.

    I have no problem supporting my head in the air. The only problem is when it
    is smashed into the bench.
     
  8. spodosaurus

    spodosaurus Guest

    Lee Michaels wrote:
    > "spodosaurus" wrote
    >
    >>Lee Michaels wrote:
    >>
    >>>"The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >>>>head?
    >>>>
    >>>>I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >>>>mean.
    >>>>
    >>>>If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    >>>>unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    >>>>can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    >>>>bench either.
    >>>>
    >>>>What do you think?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    >>>middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    >>>advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage
    >>>on the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press
    >>>bar was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up
    >>>past the bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two
    >>>into my chest.
    >>>
    >>>The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    >>>head on the bench sideways.

    >>
    >>Why? I have a very similar setup (sans the cambered bar and add a folded
    >>blanket on top of the wooden bench) and simply held my nose off the bench.
    >>You should be strong enough to hold your spine in a position where your
    >>collarbones are well off the bench, and unless you've been lying an awful
    >>lot your nose won't get squished that way either.
    >>

    >
    >
    > As I pointed out, I have had extensive neckinjuries that complicat this for
    > me. As for keeping the clavicles off the bench, this is no problem as I have
    > a barrel chest.
    >


    Me too, cervical and thoracic. It's a factor that makes it all the more
    important for me not to turn my head to the side when I'm doing any
    weight training movement. Range of motion work involving trunk twisting
    or head turns is never done with added resistance.

    >
    >
    >>> And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries in two auto accidents.
    >>>So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck stress using this bench.
    >>>
    >>>I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    >>>better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says,
    >>>if this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be
    >>>strengthened.

    >>
    >>And your upper back muscles, too, if you can't keep your head and neck off
    >>the bench in the first place.
    >>
    >>
    >>>Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    >>>massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole
    >>>(or face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit
    >>>all people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting
    >>>your face in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.

    >>
    >>There's no need. Tilt your head back a little bit and let your chin touch
    >>the bench. If your nose is really that big you should consider plastic
    >>surgery before you try and kiss anyone.
    >>
    >>Joking aside, I have this sort of setup for my power rack. A board, the
    >>edges rounded with a router, and a bit of 1x2 attached fore and aft within
    >>the pins to prevent the bench rolling off the pins. I did not need to turn
    >>my head side to side, even when I was significantly smaller than I am now.
    >>I held my head back a little bit, and kept the muscles supporting my
    >>thoracic spine tight so as not to hunch forward and bury my face in the
    >>bench. I'm having trouble picturing your difficulty. Perhaps a more
    >>detailed description or a FULLY CLOTHED jpeg might help...
    >>

    >
    > What can I say? I grab the bar and if my face is pointed down, my neck
    > hurts.


    My back hurts, but it didn't before the injuries. It doesn't seem to
    make them worse, though. It hurts less than chest supported rows on a
    machine or a pivot supported row bench. It's not the easiest thing for
    me to get myself on and off of anymore, though.

    > The way my bench is supported does not allow me to put my face over
    > the end of the bench.


    Same.

    > By going to another bench where my face extends beyond
    > the bench, the problem is solved.


    I wouldn't be surprised if something like that hurt me, whereas the way
    your old bench is set up would suit me just fine (well, as fine as any
    supported row can given the thoracic injuries...).

    >
    > I have no problem supporting my head in the air. The only problem is when it
    > is smashed into the bench.


    I think I'd find that distinctly unpleasant as well. The worst damage is
    in my lumbar and thoracic spine (with the sacral spine rapidly trying to
    make up lost ground in the 'which part of my spine is the most damaged
    competition). My neck, though painful and restricted, is at this point
    better off. Then again, if I am lucky enough to have sufficient time it
    may progress as badly as the thoracic damage has.
     
  9. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 12:23:30 -0500, "Lee Michaels"
    <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    >
    >"spodosaurus" wrote
    >> Lee Michaels wrote:
    >>> "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >>>>head?
    >>>>
    >>>>I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >>>>mean.
    >>>>
    >>>>If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    >>>>unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    >>>>can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    >>>>bench either.
    >>>>
    >>>>What do you think?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    >>> middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    >>> advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage
    >>> on the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press
    >>> bar was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up
    >>> past the bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two
    >>> into my chest.
    >>>
    >>> The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    >>> head on the bench sideways.

    >>
    >> Why? I have a very similar setup (sans the cambered bar and add a folded
    >> blanket on top of the wooden bench) and simply held my nose off the bench.
    >> You should be strong enough to hold your spine in a position where your
    >> collarbones are well off the bench, and unless you've been lying an awful
    >> lot your nose won't get squished that way either.
    >>

    >
    >As I pointed out, I have had extensive neckinjuries that complicat this for
    >me. As for keeping the clavicles off the bench, this is no problem as I have
    >a barrel chest.
    >
    >
    >>> And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries in two auto accidents.
    >>> So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck stress using this bench.
    >>>
    >>> I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    >>> better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says,
    >>> if this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be
    >>> strengthened.

    >>
    >> And your upper back muscles, too, if you can't keep your head and neck off
    >> the bench in the first place.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    >>> massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole
    >>> (or face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit
    >>> all people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting
    >>> your face in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.

    >>
    >> There's no need. Tilt your head back a little bit and let your chin touch
    >> the bench. If your nose is really that big you should consider plastic
    >> surgery before you try and kiss anyone.
    >>
    >> Joking aside, I have this sort of setup for my power rack. A board, the
    >> edges rounded with a router, and a bit of 1x2 attached fore and aft within
    >> the pins to prevent the bench rolling off the pins. I did not need to turn
    >> my head side to side, even when I was significantly smaller than I am now.
    >> I held my head back a little bit, and kept the muscles supporting my
    >> thoracic spine tight so as not to hunch forward and bury my face in the
    >> bench. I'm having trouble picturing your difficulty. Perhaps a more
    >> detailed description or a FULLY CLOTHED jpeg might help...
    >>

    >What can I say? I grab the bar and if my face is pointed down, my neck
    >hurts. The way my bench is supported does not allow me to put my face over
    >the end of the bench. By going to another bench where my face extends beyond
    >the bench, the problem is solved.
    >
    >I have no problem supporting my head in the air. The only problem is when it
    >is smashed into the bench.
    >


    Try an exercise ball, it's like being on a very comfortable sofa.
     
  10. JMW

    JMW Guest

    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    >
    >"The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> When doing the barbell prone row, what's the best thing to do with your
    >> head?
    >>
    >> I would have thought there's no good place to put it, if you get what I
    >> mean.
    >>
    >> If you hang it over the end of the bench, you could strain your
    >> unsupported neck muscles, but if you have your head on the bench, you
    >> can't put your face to one side, but you can't press your chin onto the
    >> bench either.
    >>
    >> What do you think?
    >>

    >
    >When I built my power rack, I designed a capability to put a bench in the
    >middle of it to do rows from thehookson the power rack. This had several
    >advantages. It was easy to quickly set up the movement. The plate storage on
    >the rack allowed me to quickly load up the bar. A cambered bech press bar
    >was used to allow the bar to travel higher because it could come up past the
    >bottom of the bench. So I could "touch" the bar an inch or two into my
    >chest.
    >
    >The disadvantages?? Exactly what you are talking about. I had to lay my
    >head on the bench sideways. And I am a guy who has sustained neck injuries
    >in two auto accidents. So rows would end up causing some unwanted neck
    >stress using this bench.
    >
    >I found that an ugly bench I pounded together out of scrap wood to be a
    >better solution. Because the head should be free. And like Keith says, if
    >this is a problem, your neck muscles are weak and need to be strengthened.
    >
    >Ideal, fantasy solution?? Since I have built both gym equipment and some
    >massage tables, it would be possible to build a bench with a face hole (or
    >face support). The problem here is that it is hard to build to fit all
    >people. And if used in a public environment, you would be putting your face
    >in direct contact with a face hole. Not exactly sanitary.


    Why not create a chest-supported T-bar rower? Here's what Trygve's
    looks like:

    http://www.trygve.com/tbar01.jpg

    All you would need to dummy up is the "bench" with the chest pad and
    foot plate. The T-bar can be created from a cheap, used Olympic bar
    and attached to your power rack by means of a couple of parts from
    BodySolid:

    http://www.fitnessfactory.com/Item.aspx?ItemID=269&ItemLabel=TBR10:+T-Bar+Row+Platform
    http://www.fitnessfactory.com/Item.aspx?ItemID=51&ItemLabel=LBB28:+Lat+Blaster+Bar

    You could probably dummy up some cheap substitutes for those, too.
     
  11. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "JMW" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > Why not create a chest-supported T-bar rower? Here's what Trygve's
    > looks like:
    >
    > http://www.trygve.com/tbar01.jpg
    >
    > All you would need to dummy up is the "bench" with the chest pad and
    > foot plate. The T-bar can be created from a cheap, used Olympic bar
    > and attached to your power rack by means of a couple of parts from
    > BodySolid:
    >
    > http://www.fitnessfactory.com/Item.aspx?ItemID=269&ItemLabel=TBR10:+T-Bar+Row+Platform
    > http://www.fitnessfactory.com/Item.aspx?ItemID=51&ItemLabel=LBB28:+Lat+Blaster+Bar
    >
    > You could probably dummy up some cheap substitutes for those, too.


    That is what I have in mind. Although I have a special bar in mind.

    But I also picked up a regular standing T-Bar rower at a closeout recently
    for cheap. I am just going to build a chest support for it out of wood and
    some padding.
     
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