Pros and Cons

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Carol In WI, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. Carol In WI

    Carol In WI Guest

    How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    Carol In WI
     
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  2. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > Carol In WI
    >


    Stove can work just as well - but you have to fret about the timing and the
    burner setting. With a rice cooker you can set it and forget it (to coin a
    phrase).


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  3. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:

    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > Carol In WI


    I have to confess that I have never seen a rice cooker, and never seen a
    need for one. I always do it in a pot on the stove.
     
  4. aem

    aem Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice

    cookers?
    > Carol In WI


    Little difference in cooking, but a few small considerations. Some of
    the expensive rice cookers do a good job of keeping the rice warm for
    longer than is normal on the stove top. We're so short on counter
    space that a rice cooker would create its own space management
    problems, so I use a pot. In a previous location the electric stove
    was so unresponsive we got better results from a rice cooker than the
    pot.

    -aem
     
  5. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:D[email protected]:

    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice
    > cookers? Carol In WI
    >
    >
    >


    If you are talking the metal pot insert style rice cooker and not the
    generic veggie steamer type.

    It isn't any different. But it is more convienent if you eat loads of
    rice. Once you get the 'recipe' down pat, it is very easy and no watching
    a pot to get perfect rice every time. As well the rice cooker will keep
    the rice warm a long time 2-6 hrs (depending on brand). Also you can do 1
    pot meals in a rice cooker (see example). It is hard to find a 1 person
    sized rice cooker (1 cup to 6 cups), mostly they come in family or larger
    sized units (6 cups to 25 cups).

    What I mean by 'recipe' is the amount of liquid used to meet your taste
    preferences...could range from 1.5(12 fluid oz) cups to 2.5(20 fluid oz)
    cups per cup of normal raw white long grain rice.

    An Example:
    (I like my white long grain rice cooked with 2 cups liquid, 16 fluid oz
    per 1 cup rice.)

    1 can cream of chicken (10 oz) plus 6 oz of water (makes 2 cups)
    1 cup white long grain rice
    1 tbsp butter (optional)
    3-4 chicken thighs cut into chunks
    1 can sliced mushrooms or fresh mushrooms sliced
    1/2 small onion finely sliced
    1/2 cup carrot small dice
    1 clove garlic minced or to taste
    salt and pepper to taste
    pinch cumin or to taste
    1/2 cup frozen peas

    put rice in cooker add all other ingredients *except peas.

    stir with plastic/bamboo utensil.(metal utensil will damage non-stick
    coating).

    start rice cooker.

    when rice is ready (15 to 20 minutes later) stir in frozen peas and
    serve.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  6. chillled

    chillled Guest

    Carol In WI wrote:
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > Carol In WI


    Rice on the stove turns out much better for me, but I'm following my
    grandmother's instructions. My rice cooker turns out OK rice, but
    barely. I only bought the thing b/c I was stuck in an apartment with an
    electric stove which made it too hard to get the heat low enough for rice.
     
  7. One time on Usenet, "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> said:

    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?


    I use an electric steamer/rice maker: On the 'pro' side, you get
    fluffier rice and no scorching. The 'con' is having to clean it;
    it's much easier to wash a single saucepan...

    --
    J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
    "You still haven't explained why the pool is
    filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
     
  8. I could never get consistent results cooking rice by the absorbtion method,
    until I started using a friends recipe, in turn given to her by her amah in
    Kuala Lumpur. Works equally well with any pot (as long as the lid is tight)
    or amount of rice. I set the timer for 12 minutes and its always ready in
    exactly that time - kind of magic, or something.

    Take 1 quantity of rice, wash 3 times in plenty of cold water. Drain, place
    in a pot with a tight fitting lid. Add cold water to cover the rice by about
    1 cm (slosh the rice about a bit until the surface of the rice layer is
    reasonably flat to measure the 1 cm, but no need to be too fanatical) Bring
    to the boil, stir once, cover and immediately turn stove to lowest setting.
    Cook for 12 minutes (set timer). Take off the heat, fluff up rice. Cover
    again and leave for at least 2 minutes and up to 30 before consuming.
    Just reading this recipe, it does SEEM like an advert for the rice cooker
    mentioned before, but its not really complicated at all, and I do it on
    auto-pilot. Never fails.
    Richard.

    "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > Carol In WI
     
  9. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Richard Green wrote:
    > I could never get consistent results cooking rice by the absorbtion

    method,
    > until I started using a friends recipe, in turn given to her by her

    amah in
    > Kuala Lumpur. Works equally well with any pot (as long as the lid is

    tight)
    > or amount of rice. I set the timer for 12 minutes and its always

    ready in
    > exactly that time - kind of magic, or something.
    >
    > Take 1 quantity of rice, wash 3 times in plenty of cold water. Drain,

    place
    > in a pot with a tight fitting lid. Add cold water to cover the rice

    by about
    > 1 cm (slosh the rice about a bit until the surface of the rice layer

    is
    > reasonably flat to measure the 1 cm, but no need to be too fanatical)

    Bring
    > to the boil, stir once, cover and immediately turn stove to lowest

    setting.
    > Cook for 12 minutes (set timer). Take off the heat, fluff up rice.

    Cover
    > again and leave for at least 2 minutes and up to 30 before consuming.
    > Just reading this recipe, it does SEEM like an advert for the rice

    cooker
    > mentioned before, but its not really complicated at all, and I do it

    on
    > auto-pilot. Never fails.
    > Richard.


    I do the exact same thing, except I rinse the rice until clear before
    cooking, and add a tsp of white vinegar to the cooking water. Never
    had gummy/sticky rice.

    -L.
     
  10. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Richard Green wrote:
    >
    > Take 1 quantity of rice, wash 3 times in plenty of cold water.


    Why? Whether to wash rice depends on the rice... rice packaged in the
    US is typically fortified, and *it's clean*, any rinsing washes the
    added nutrients down the drain... don't wash converted or parboiled
    white rice either (this is not instant rice), the unhulled grain has
    been soaked, pressure-steamed and dried before milling. This treatment
    gelatinizes the starch in the grain (for fluffy, separated cooked rice)
    and infuses some of the nutrients of the bran and germ into the
    kernel's heart. Imported rice such as from India, Italy, Pakistan,
    etc. is as filthy as filthy gets, it's grown in the same fields where
    raw sewage is leached and must be scrupulously washed... why anyone in
    the US buys that crap is unfathomable.
     
  11. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest


    >I have to confess that I have never seen a rice cooker, and never seen a
    >need for one. I always do it in a pot on the stove.


    if you cook a lot of rice it is a very useful tool. add rice and water push the
    button and your done. a good one can keep the rice ok for 24 hours or more. try
    that with a pan.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
    See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  12. Carol In WI wrote:
    >
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice

    cookers?

    1) It is impossible to undercook/overcook/burn rice in
    the machine. It is merely unlikely to
    undercook/overcook/burn rice on the stove. "Set it and
    forget it" like in an infomercial.

    2) The machine does not take up a burner. One more
    course in your banquet.

    3) Gadget freaks smile at machines. That includes really
    fancy stoves, of course, so it is necessary to get all of
    the above and heck even a rotisserie. Now set that gadget
    freak onto the quest of figuring out how to cook the meat
    in the machine and the rice on the rotisserie ...

    4) Most rice cookers have a keep-warm setting. I have
    never seen a kettle with that setting. You're not
    counting a crockpot as on the stove, right?

    5) Rice cookers are usually white. Few pans are white.

    6) Rice cookers make miserable fried rice. On the stove
    makes good fried rice.
     
  13. aem

    aem Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Whether to wash rice depends on the rice... rice packaged in the
    > US is typically fortified, and *it's clean*, any rinsing washes the
    > added nutrients down the drain...


    Even if one is willing to take on faith that it's clean, the "added
    nutrients" are an unknown mix of vitamins. Who needs either the added
    vitamins or the uncertainty as to dosages?

    > don't wash converted or parboiled
    > white rice either (this is not instant rice), [snip]


    Better yet, don't buy or eat this stuff in the first place. The
    texture is bizarre. Where did this notion that "every grain separate"
    is a good thing come from, other than from Uncle Ben's advertising?

    > Imported rice such as from India, Italy, Pakistan,
    > etc. is as filthy as filthy gets, it's grown in the same fields where
    > raw sewage is leached and must be scrupulously washed... [snip]


    Overstated and overgeneralized, but certainly a reason to wash your
    rice. Basmati and jasmine rices taste so good that washing is a small
    price to pay.

    -aem
     
  14. I do it this way cause it always works. I assume its because the rice,
    washed of excess starch is less likely to glug. I take your point about the
    nutrients down the drain, however. People who like super separating rice
    grains often boil rice in a lot of water. This must also waste a
    considerable amount of nutrient. If I feel my diet needs a bit of a lift
    I'll occasionally eat brown rice, but I also wash this three times -
    porbably more from habit than anything else.
    Richard.
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Richard Green wrote:
    >>
    >> Take 1 quantity of rice, wash 3 times in plenty of cold water.

    >
    > Why? Whether to wash rice depends on the rice... rice packaged in the
    > US is typically fortified, and *it's clean*, any rinsing washes the
    > added nutrients down the drain... don't wash converted or parboiled
    > white rice either (this is not instant rice), the unhulled grain has
    > been soaked, pressure-steamed and dried before milling. This treatment
    > gelatinizes the starch in the grain (for fluffy, separated cooked rice)
    > and infuses some of the nutrients of the bran and germ into the
    > kernel's heart. Imported rice such as from India, Italy, Pakistan,
    > etc. is as filthy as filthy gets, it's grown in the same fields where
    > raw sewage is leached and must be scrupulously washed... why anyone in
    > the US buys that crap is unfathomable.
    >a lot
     
  15. --

    -- Guest

    "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > Carol In WI
    >


    From my time in southern China, Indonesia, and other such rice areas:

    1) Using the stove, "plain" rice can be made in at least 14 different
    consistencies I know of, from breakfast rice to wet rice to sticky rice to
    dry rice. (All are from rice and water, nothing else except for maybe some
    salt. And they all taste different.)

    Rice cookers basically make only two or three kinds of cooked rice (if they
    have settings, otherwise you get whatever it makes)

    2) To wash or not to wash - it's not germs or anything living you will need
    to worry about - boiling anything at 212 F for the time it takes to cook
    rice will kill anything you can kill, short of geothermal bacteria.

    3) Commercial rice is processed to be idiot-proof and all-white so the
    consumer can have identical individual kernels ("fluffy rice", made fluffy
    to put under "chow mein" slime or cream of mushroom soup et al and get
    stirred up to thereby get it sticky again :) ) - if you follow their
    recipe. Nothing wrong with that. Less to worry about, and most guests
    would pick out the stray natural rice "bran" because it wasn't white anyway.

    4) Old rock-solid recipe - 1 part white rice, 2 parts water and a little
    salt in kettle, cover, bring mix to just boil, turn down to simmer 15-20
    minutes, time depends on consistency of the kernel you want. (I like to
    gently stir it once as a side effect of using a flat spatula just after the
    rice settles into the simmer, to get any clinging rice off the bottom of the
    pan)
    Stir every couple minutes after about five if you want sticky rice, don't
    touch it until done if you want "fine rice".
    Use more water for stickier and up to wet, use less water for dry and
    lonely kernel rice.

    When it is done cooking, fluff it gently with a fork and put the cover back
    on - (yes, including wet rice - even though it sloshes.)

    And I will note that if I had to worry about my vitamins and bran so much I
    have to have brown rice only for that reason, I would think about buying a
    box of all-bran and adding something nuitritious to the rest of my diet.

    :)
     
  16. --

    -- Guest

    forgot one thing - short grain vs medium vs long grain

    the longer the grain, usually the easier it is to get drier rice. Short for
    gummy rice, medium for sticky rice, and long for lonely kernel.

    medium is de rigeur here for slow rice pudding, since the long grain makes
    dry pudding and the short makes pasty pudding. (no, not hasty pudding
    :) )

    "--" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Carol In WI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]
    > > How is cooking rice on the stove any different than those rice cookers?
    > > Carol In WI
    > >

    >
    > From my time in southern China, Indonesia, and other such rice areas:
    >
    > 1) Using the stove, "plain" rice can be made in at least 14 different
    > consistencies I know of, from breakfast rice to wet rice to sticky rice to
    > dry rice. (All are from rice and water, nothing else except for maybe

    some
    > salt. And they all taste different.)
    >
    > Rice cookers basically make only two or three kinds of cooked rice (if

    they
    > have settings, otherwise you get whatever it makes)
    >
    > 2) To wash or not to wash - it's not germs or anything living you will

    need
    > to worry about - boiling anything at 212 F for the time it takes to cook
    > rice will kill anything you can kill, short of geothermal bacteria.
    >
    > 3) Commercial rice is processed to be idiot-proof and all-white so the
    > consumer can have identical individual kernels ("fluffy rice", made fluffy
    > to put under "chow mein" slime or cream of mushroom soup et al and get
    > stirred up to thereby get it sticky again :) ) - if you follow their
    > recipe. Nothing wrong with that. Less to worry about, and most guests
    > would pick out the stray natural rice "bran" because it wasn't white

    anyway.
    >
    > 4) Old rock-solid recipe - 1 part white rice, 2 parts water and a little
    > salt in kettle, cover, bring mix to just boil, turn down to simmer 15-20
    > minutes, time depends on consistency of the kernel you want. (I like to
    > gently stir it once as a side effect of using a flat spatula just after

    the
    > rice settles into the simmer, to get any clinging rice off the bottom of

    the
    > pan)
    > Stir every couple minutes after about five if you want sticky rice,

    don't
    > touch it until done if you want "fine rice".
    > Use more water for stickier and up to wet, use less water for dry and
    > lonely kernel rice.
    >
    > When it is done cooking, fluff it gently with a fork and put the cover

    back
    > on - (yes, including wet rice - even though it sloshes.)
    >
    > And I will note that if I had to worry about my vitamins and bran so much

    I
    > have to have brown rice only for that reason, I would think about buying a
    > box of all-bran and adding something nuitritious to the rest of my diet.
    >
    > :)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
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