Re: 2 Questions: Healthiest vegetables? & Risk of vitamin A overdose?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by chris, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. chris

    chris Guest

    Thanks for all your thoughtful suggestions.. and to anyone yet to
    respond, I neglected to mention that I am a 39-yr-old male
    lacto-vegetarian in good health who eats a well-balanced diet
    including plenty of fresh fruit, whole grains, and very few processed
    or sugary foods (no colas, etc.).

    chris
     
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  2. chris wrote:
    > Thanks for all your thoughtful suggestions.. and to anyone yet to
    > respond, I neglected to mention that I am a 39-yr-old male
    > lacto-vegetarian in good health who eats a well-balanced diet
    > including plenty of fresh fruit, whole grains, and very few processed
    > or sugary foods (no colas, etc.).



    While I suppose it is none of my business, I'm curious enough to ask the
    reason for your questions. Why would you want to know about limiting to
    vegetables? I could picture it for a science fiction story where the
    survivors on a planet have room in the space ship for only 5 packets of
    seeds and then get strange symptoms that turn out to be overdoses of
    vitamin A or something like that but can't picture a limit to 5
    vegetables as part of a well-balanced diet in this time and place.


    --Lia
     
  3. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    chris wrote:
    :: Thanks for all your thoughtful suggestions.. and to anyone yet to
    :: respond, I neglected to mention that I am a 39-yr-old male
    :: lacto-vegetarian in good health who eats a well-balanced diet
    :: including plenty of fresh fruit, whole grains, and very few processed
    :: or sugary foods (no colas, etc.).
    ::
    For males favoring onions, tomatoes and broccoli would probably give
    some protection against prostate cancer also.

    --
    Juhana
     
  4. chris

    chris Guest

    Lia wrote:

    > While I suppose it is none of my business, I'm curious enough to ask the
    > reason for your questions. Why would you want to know about limiting to
    > vegetables? I could picture it for a science fiction story where the
    > survivors on a planet have room in the space ship for only 5 packets of
    > seeds and then get strange symptoms that turn out to be overdoses of
    > vitamin A or something like that but can't picture a limit to 5
    > vegetables as part of a well-balanced diet in this time and place.


    I eat a well-balanced diet of veggies, fruits, grains, beans, dairy,
    and nuts/seeds everyday, but I'm lazy, so I tend to eat the same foods
    each day. I try to vary it up as much I can, but I wanted to know if
    there was a better combination of veggies than my daily staple of
    spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, and carrots (I also eat cucumbers and
    alfalfa sprouts at lunch).

    thanks,
    chris
     
  5. chris wrote:

    > I eat a well-balanced diet of veggies, fruits, grains, beans, dairy,
    > and nuts/seeds everyday, but I'm lazy, so I tend to eat the same foods
    > each day. I try to vary it up as much I can, but I wanted to know if
    > there was a better combination of veggies than my daily staple of
    > spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, and carrots (I also eat cucumbers and
    > alfalfa sprouts at lunch).



    Ah, now I understand, and it makes sense. If you want to vary your diet
    more without sacrificing your essential laziness (something else I
    understand), come here (rfc) for recipes or take a look at the thread on
    best vegetarian cookbooks. Oddly enough, it looks like you followed my
    earlier advice without knowing what it was. You have something in the
    leafy green category (spinach), something in the cabbage family category
    (broccoli), something dark orange (carrots) and something flavorful
    (tomato). The only think I'd add is a squash like butternut squash.


    --Lia
     
  6. On 21 Feb 2005 07:54:20 -0800, [email protected] (chris) wrote:

    >I eat a well-balanced diet of veggies, fruits, grains, beans, dairy,
    >and nuts/seeds everyday, but I'm lazy, so I tend to eat the same foods
    >each day. I try to vary it up as much I can, but I wanted to know if
    >there was a better combination of veggies than my daily staple of
    >spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, and carrots (I also eat cucumbers and
    >alfalfa sprouts at lunch).


    I think maybe you are at risk of essential aminoacids deficiency. And
    probably betaine/choline deficiency. try some beets, preferably grown
    in salty areas as that induce betaine production, and use more beans.
    Also wheat bran, wheat germ, whole wheat

    Look at
    http://www.vitaminexpress.com/healthnotes/newswire_2004_04_08_1.htm

    http://www.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/133/5/1302 also contains
    some tables on betaine and choline. (and there are several others)

    Spinach is also a good source, but in all vegetable where free amino
    acids and stuff like betaine is primarily used as osmolytes in order
    to keep constant water turgor (hydration level and pressure inside
    cells), stress conditions are important. Plants watered daily during
    drought spell express far less of these compounds than in vegetables
    and other plants irregularly watered during dry periods.
     
  7. Seems important not to miss out on eating berries. Blueberries,
    blackberries, and other berries are very high in anitoxidants. Higher
    than the foods mentioned, I think. I eat them every day even when I
    was only able to buy frozen ones, since I'm guessing berries that were
    frozen still contain tons of anthocyanins (sp?).
     
  8. John Que

    John Que Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Seems important not to miss out on eating berries. Blueberries,
    > blackberries, and other berries are very high in anitoxidants. Higher
    > than the foods mentioned, I think. I eat them every day even when I
    > was only able to buy frozen ones, since I'm guessing berries that were
    > frozen still contain tons of anthocyanins (sp?).


    Yes, they still contain it. Anthocyanins are purple.
    Berries are an excellent food. Plums and prune
    (both fresh and dried) are also good sources.

    >
     
  9. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Alf Christophersen wrote:
    :: On 21 Feb 2005 07:54:20 -0800, [email protected] (chris) wrote:
    ::
    ::: I eat a well-balanced diet of veggies, fruits, grains, beans, dairy,
    ::: and nuts/seeds everyday, but I'm lazy, so I tend to eat the same
    ::: foods each day. I try to vary it up as much I can, but I wanted to
    ::: know if there was a better combination of veggies than my daily
    ::: staple of spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, and carrots (I also eat
    ::: cucumbers and alfalfa sprouts at lunch).
    ::
    :: I think maybe you are at risk of essential aminoacids deficiency.

    Essential amino acids deficiency with a lactovegetarian diet containing
    beans, grains and nuts/seeds everyday? :) Please show some evidence.

    --
    Juhana
     
  10. On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 12:43:53 +0200, "Juhana Harju"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Essential amino acids deficiency with a lactovegetarian diet containing
    >beans, grains and nuts/seeds everyday? :) Please show some evidence.


    oVerlooked the bean :) Without beans,you are at high risk.

    But lysine may be low.
     
  11. chris

    chris Guest

    Janet wrote:

    > Seems important not to miss out on eating berries. Blueberries,
    > blackberries, and other berries are very high in anitoxidants. Higher
    > than the foods mentioned, I think. I eat them every day even when I
    > was only able to buy frozen ones, since I'm guessing berries that were
    > frozen still contain tons of anthocyanins (sp?).


    Agreed. I eat half a cup of fresh blueberries everyday, year-round.
    I also eat 2 bananas everyday, as well as other fruits like raisins,
    occasionally grapes and strawberries.

    thanks again to everyone for their useful advice..
    chris
     
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