Re: "Fast food and sedentary lifestyle: a combination that leads to obesity"

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Enrico C, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On 27 Feb 2006 06:53:47 -0800, TC wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :

    > Well of course, it could not possibly be the grain based carbs.
    >
    >
    > David R. Jacobs, Jr., Ph.D., Division of Epidemiology, School of Public
    > Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Research on the effect
    > of whole grains on insulin sensitivity in overweight hyperinsulinemic
    > adults was partially supported by, Inc. (Am. J. Clin.
    > Nut. 2002;75(5):848-55) Study on Wheaties/whole grains received
    > funding from General Mills, which issued a press release on it
    > (3/1/99). (Am. J. Pub. Health. 1999;89:322-9)

    General Mills


    There was no need to look for that.
    It's already acknowledged in Dr Jacobs's editorial.

    "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS"

    "DR Jacobs has received grants from General Mills Inc and is a member
    of the Scientific Advisory Board of the California Walnut Commission."



    > How would that look to the stockholders if obesity was linked to grain
    > based carbs?
    >
    > Nice piece of non-science marketing. And it got thru the peer review
    > process.
    >
    > The second study you referenced makes more sense:
    >
    > "Conclusion: In a Mediterranean cohort, particularly in the
    > participants who had already gained weight, an increased consumption of
    > sugar-sweetened soft drinks and of hamburgers, pizza, and sausages was
    > associated with a higher risk of additional subsequent weight gain."


    > High frutose corn syrup and starchy grains are a major part of obesity.



    Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    that study on fast-food goers in Spain.
    The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    pizza, and sausages).

    "In the participants who had gained ≥3 kg in the 5 y before
    baseline, the adjusted odds ratio of subsequent weight gain for the
    fifth quintile compared with the first quintile of sugar-sweetened
    soft drink consumption was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.1; P for trend =
    0.02)."
    [...]
    "The consumption of hamburgers, pizza, and sausages (as a proxy for
    fast-food consumption) was also independently associated with weight
    gain (adjusted odds ratio for the fifth compared with the first
    quintile = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.4; P for trend = 0.05)."

    X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food
     
    Tags:


  2. TC

    TC Guest

    Enrico C wrote:
    > On 27 Feb 2006 06:53:47 -0800, TC wrote in
    > <news:[email protected]> on
    > sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :
    >
    > > Well of course, it could not possibly be the grain based carbs.
    > >
    > >
    > > David R. Jacobs, Jr., Ph.D., Division of Epidemiology, School of Public
    > > Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Research on the effect
    > > of whole grains on insulin sensitivity in overweight hyperinsulinemic
    > > adults was partially supported by, Inc. (Am. J. Clin.
    > > Nut. 2002;75(5):848-55) Study on Wheaties/whole grains received
    > > funding from General Mills, which issued a press release on it
    > > (3/1/99). (Am. J. Pub. Health. 1999;89:322-9)

    > General Mills
    >
    >
    > There was no need to look for that.
    > It's already acknowledged in Dr Jacobs's editorial.
    >
    > "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS"
    >
    > "DR Jacobs has received grants from General Mills Inc and is a member
    > of the Scientific Advisory Board of the California Walnut Commission."
    >
    >
    >
    > > How would that look to the stockholders if obesity was linked to grain
    > > based carbs?
    > >
    > > Nice piece of non-science marketing. And it got thru the peer review
    > > process.
    > >
    > > The second study you referenced makes more sense:
    > >
    > > "Conclusion: In a Mediterranean cohort, particularly in the
    > > participants who had already gained weight, an increased consumption of
    > > sugar-sweetened soft drinks and of hamburgers, pizza, and sausages was
    > > associated with a higher risk of additional subsequent weight gain."

    >
    > > High frutose corn syrup and starchy grains are a major part of obesity.

    >
    >
    > Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    > that study on fast-food goers in Spain.


    Most non-diet sodas are sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.

    > The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    > was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    > pizza, and sausages).
    >
    > "In the participants who had gained =3 kg in the 5 y before
    > baseline, the adjusted odds ratio of subsequent weight gain for the
    > fifth quintile compared with the first quintile of sugar-sweetened
    > soft drink consumption was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.1; P for trend =
    > 0.02)."
    > [...]
    > "The consumption of hamburgers, pizza, and sausages (as a proxy for
    > fast-food consumption) was also independently associated with weight
    > gain (adjusted odds ratio for the fifth compared with the first
    > quintile = 1.2; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.4; P for trend = 0.05)."
    >
    > X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food
     
  3. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:32:59 +0100, Enrico C wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :

    > Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    > that study on fast-food goers in Spain.
    > The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    > was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    > pizza, and sausages).


    I daresay the main reason for that is rather obvious: soda pops add
    calories but leave you hungry.

    X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food
     
  4. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On 27 Feb 2006 07:39:16 -0800, TC wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :

    >> Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    >> that study on fast-food goers in Spain.

    >
    > Most non-diet sodas are sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.


    Ok, but would sucrose instead of HFCS make a difference?

    X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food
     
  5. TC

    TC Guest

    Possibly. But that is theoretical. Most sodas are hfcs and hfcs has
    found its way into many, if not most, manufactured foods.

    TC

    Enrico C wrote:
    > On 27 Feb 2006 07:39:16 -0800, TC wrote in
    > <news:[email protected]> on
    > sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :
    >
    > >> Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    > >> that study on fast-food goers in Spain.

    > >
    > > Most non-diet sodas are sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.

    >
    > Ok, but would sucrose instead of HFCS make a difference?
    >
    > X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food
     
  6. On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:42:05 +0100, Enrico C
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Most non-diet sodas are sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.

    >
    >Ok, but would sucrose instead of HFCS make a difference?


    Sucrose is 50% fructose, so there is very little differences.

    But over here, most are sweetened by sucrose anyway.
     
  7. Jim Purcell

    Jim Purcell Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Enrico C <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:32:59 +0100, Enrico C wrote in
    > <news:[email protected]> on
    > sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :
    >
    > > Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    > > that study on fast-food goers in Spain.
    > > The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    > > was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    > > pizza, and sausages).

    >
    > I daresay the main reason for that is rather obvious: soda pops add
    > calories but leave you hungry.
    >
    >
    > X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food


    Not only leaves you hungry, but I think it gives you a craving for
    more!!!!
     
  8. BOBOBOnoBO®

    BOBOBOnoBO® Guest

    Jim Purcell wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Enrico C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:32:59 +0100, Enrico C wrote in
    > > <news:[email protected]> on
    > > sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :
    > >
    > > > Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    > > > that study on fast-food goers in Spain.
    > > > The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    > > > was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    > > > pizza, and sausages).

    > >
    > > I daresay the main reason for that is rather obvious: soda pops add
    > > calories but leave you hungry.
    > >
    > >
    > > X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food

    >
    > Not only leaves you hungry, but I think it gives you a craving for
    > more!!!!


    All high glycemic carbs do that. It took me a while to get used to
    diet soda, but I hardly remember what the sugared variety tastes like
    anymore, as the only time I've had it was as a mixer for booze, and
    that only a few times in the last 10 years or so.
    Did you know that calorie for calorie, plain, dry baked potatro will
    raise your blood sugar higher and faster that sugar straight out of a
    sugar bowl?

    --Bryan
     
  9. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 17:27:46 -0700, Jim Purcell wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Enrico C <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 16:32:59 +0100, Enrico C wrote in
    >> <news:[email protected]> on
    >> sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food :
    >>
    >>> Sugar-sweetened soft drinks seem to be the real culprit, according to
    >>> that study on fast-food goers in Spain.
    >>> The link between an increased consumption of soda pops and weight gain
    >>> was 1.6, while it was 1.2 for other fast-food items (hamburgers,
    >>> pizza, and sausages).

    >>
    >> I daresay the main reason for that is rather obvious: soda pops add
    >> calories but leave you hungry.
    >>
    >>
    >> X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food

    >
    > Not only leaves you hungry, but I think it gives you a craving for
    > more!!!!


    I guess that depends on the individual.


    X'Posted to: sci.med.nutrition,alt.food.fast-food

    --
    Enrico C

    * cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *
     
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