Re: Sashimi vs. sushi quality

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mite, Dec 30, 2004.

  1. Mite

    Mite Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Bubbabob <[email protected]_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:

    > Mite <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > According to my Japanese dictionary, sashimi is fresh meat eaten raw,
    > > thinly cut, with soy sauce (or other).
    > > It is mostly seafood, but not only. There is basashi (sashimi of horse
    > > meat) and I think I saw once beef carpaccio referred to as sashimi
    > > too.
    > >
    > > Mite
    > > http://www.shopncook.com
    > >

    >
    > Could raw Dutch herring be considered a form of sashimi? It's by far my
    > favorite raw fish.


    Herring is one of the rare fish that is *not* eaten as sashimi in Japan.
    I believe (I could be wrong) it is forbidden by law because of some
    nasty parasites.
    How come it is eaten raw elsewhere?

    Mite
    http://www.shopncook.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Mite wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Bubbabob <[email protected]_remove_this_thuntek.net> wrote:
    >
    > > Mite <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > According to my Japanese dictionary, sashimi is fresh meat eaten raw,
    > > > thinly cut, with soy sauce (or other).
    > > > It is mostly seafood, but not only. There is basashi (sashimi of horse
    > > > meat) and I think I saw once beef carpaccio referred to as sashimi
    > > > too.
    > > >
    > > > Mite
    > > > http://www.shopncook.com
    > > >

    > >
    > > Could raw Dutch herring be considered a form of sashimi? It's by far my
    > > favorite raw fish.

    >
    > Herring is one of the rare fish that is *not* eaten as sashimi in Japan.
    > I believe (I could be wrong) it is forbidden by law because of some
    > nasty parasites.
    > How come it is eaten raw elsewhere?


    Don't think there are any more parasites in herring than in other ocean
    fish. The Japanese seem to prefer the herring roe to the fish itself.
    Perhaps they just couldn't get a share of the herring quotas outside
    Japanese waters any more.
     
Loading...