Re: Unsprung weight ?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Qui si parla Campagnolo, Sep 15, 2004.

  1. nothing-<< But, I'm having trouble applying this concept to biking. It seems
    to me like the entire bike/rider on a road bike is unsprung.
    Therefore, it does not matter if the weight is on the rider or
    the bike. Therefore, with the exception of those of use in perfect
    condition (me, of course) you are just as wise to cut your own
    weight by a pound as you are to spend $500+ cutting the bike's
    weight by the same amount. >><BR><BR>


    Bing, bing, bing,, we have a winner!!

    Since it is a human powered machine, the energy required to propel it is the
    mass of the bike and rider. To the extreme-180 pound rider, 20 pound bike, 190
    pound rider, 10 pound bike-same energy, with fitness, etc being the same. WAY
    to much emphasis on the bicycle, way too little on fit, fitness, fat and
    finesse.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
    Tags:


  2. Retro Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On 15 Sep 2004 13:15:00 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
    >Campagnolo ) wrote:
    >
    >>WAY
    >>to much emphasis on the bicycle, way too little on fit, fitness, fat and
    >>finesse.

    >
    >Yeah, but you can _purchase_ the bike. Fitness is much harder to come
    >by.


    I just bought 2 years at LA Fitness for $595 flat. $100/year
    to renew thereafter. (The salesguy actually said people turn
    this deal down. Nutbars is all I can think.)

    In 2 years, I'll have ridden my bike about 600 times and
    visited the gym about 150, turned 200 lbs of flab and flop
    into 190 lbs of rock and roll, and will still be on the
    same piece of hardware (which would cost many times $595
    if I had it built for me today).

    --Blair
    "Cheap at twice the effort."
     
  3. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Blair P. Houghton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Retro Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >Yeah, but you can _purchase_ the bike. Fitness is much harder to come
    > >by.

    >
    > I just bought 2 years at LA Fitness for $595 flat. $100/year
    > to renew thereafter. (The salesguy actually said people turn
    > this deal down. Nutbars is all I can think.)


    Yeah, why go to the trouble of preparing fresh food when kibble is so
    much easier?

    Working out in a gym is a terrible substitute for, say, riding your
    bike. It's exercise, but that's all it is. No transportation, no
    change of scenery, no fresh air or sunshine, no exploration involved.
    You can't stop to smell the flowers when the only smells around are
    other jocks' sweaty funk and air "freshener".

    Going to a gym reminds me of the "dating simulator" games that are
    popular in Japan. It's missing out on the real thing, and paying for
    the privilege!

    Chalo Colina
     
  4. Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Blair P. Houghton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I just bought 2 years at LA Fitness for $595 flat. $100/year
    >> to renew thereafter. (The salesguy actually said people turn
    >> this deal down. Nutbars is all I can think.)

    >
    >Yeah, why go to the trouble of preparing fresh food when kibble is so
    >much easier?
    >
    >Working out in a gym is a terrible substitute for, say, riding your
    >bike. It's exercise, but that's all it is. No transportation, no
    >change of scenery, no fresh air or sunshine, no exploration involved.
    >You can't stop to smell the flowers when the only smells around are
    >other jocks' sweaty funk and air "freshener".
    >
    >Going to a gym reminds me of the "dating simulator" games that are
    >popular in Japan. It's missing out on the real thing, and paying for
    >the privilege!


    1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    2. I have some upper body muscle and I want to keep it.
    3. If I get hurt, whether due to riding or lifting or running
    from jealous husbands, I can still go to LA Fitness to swim.
    4. There's research showing that older men whose only real exercise
    for several decades was cycling will have significantly higher
    incidence of osteoporosis; the cure? Weight-bearing exercise.
    Turns out, using your legs that much for that long eats bone
    from your upper body the same way it eats muscle.
    5. Legs need days off, too.
    6. 3 days on the road, 1 day at the gym; 4 days on the road,
    1 day at the gym; 2 days on the road, 1 day at the gym;
    3 days on the road, 1 day at the gym; and so on...
    1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.

    --Blair
    "And some of them are chicks."

    P.S. Honestly, almost any woman looks good at the gym. I'm
    old enough to know that the effort is the really sexy part.
     
  5. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 04:25:25 GMT, Blair P. Houghton <[email protected]> wrote:


    >1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    >
    > --Blair
    > "And some of them are chicks."
    >
    >P.S. Honestly, almost any woman looks good at the gym. I'm
    >old enough to know that the effort is the really sexy part.


    Yes.

    Ron
     
  6. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    Blair P. Houghton <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >Working out in a gym is a terrible substitute for, say, riding your
    > >bike. It's exercise, but that's all it is.

    >
    > 1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    > 1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.
    > 1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.


    I'm beginning to perceive a pattern.

    > 2. I have some upper body muscle and I want to keep it.
    > 3. If I get hurt, whether due to riding or lifting or running
    > from jealous husbands, I can still go to LA Fitness to swim.
    > 4. There's research showing that older men whose only real exercise
    > for several decades was cycling will have significantly higher
    > incidence of osteoporosis; the cure? Weight-bearing exercise.
    > Turns out, using your legs that much for that long eats bone
    > from your upper body the same way it eats muscle.
    > 5. Legs need days off, too.
    > 6. 3 days on the road, 1 day at the gym; 4 days on the road,
    > 1 day at the gym; 2 days on the road, 1 day at the gym;
    > 3 days on the road, 1 day at the gym; and so on...
    > 1. Aerobics instructors in halter tops.


    Okay, I can't say that you don't have reasons of your own to go to the
    gym. My perceptual experience of them is of smelly guys in giant
    belts pumping iron and leaving the benches all sweaty.

    I have to say that aerobics-doing women just don't do it for me-- I
    feel like they are just trying too hard. If that were not the case,
    I'd probably have a different feeling about gyms.

    Chalo Colina
     
  7. Chalo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Okay, I can't say that you don't have reasons of your own to go to the
    >gym. My perceptual experience of them is of smelly guys in giant
    >belts pumping iron and leaving the benches all sweaty.


    My gym is about 10% muscleheads, 10% off-duty aerobics
    instructors, 10% actual ex-jocks, 10% people who should
    just let their fat consume them because they won't be
    back next week, and the rest people in various body
    conditions who are actually improving themselves every
    time they touch a machine.

    >I have to say that aerobics-doing women just don't do it for me-- I
    >feel like they are just trying too hard. If that were not the case,
    >I'd probably have a different feeling about gyms.


    Aren't you the guy who describes himself as 6'8, 400 lbs?

    Maybe you just need a gym where you fit into the machinery.

    --Blair
    "I see a business model."
     
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