readying a use fd for install

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Michael Dart, Sep 10, 2003.

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  1. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "BD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm a bit of a newbie with bike maintenance and tinkering and I'm finding that I am doing more and
    > more swapping of front derailleurs on (mostly mountain) bikes. In order to prevent extra fiddling
    > with the derailleur, is there an easy way to make sure the high-low adjustment screws are
    > "centered" (allowing maximum adjustment) before mounting? It's always frustrating to get the
    > derailleur on to begin adjusting the stop only to discover there's no enough adjustment room one
    > way or the other.
    >
    > Just wondering if anybody has a quick way to deal with this. Thanks.
    >
    >

    ???? There's no "centering" of the screws that I know of. They just are where they need to be after
    you adjust the stops. If that doesn't work maybe you have the wrong derailleur for your bike.

    Mike
     
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  2. Bd

    Bd Guest

    I'm a bit of a newbie with bike maintenance and tinkering and I'm finding that I am doing more and
    more swapping of front derailleurs on (mostly mountain) bikes. In order to prevent extra fiddling
    with the derailleur, is there an easy way to make sure the high-low adjustment screws are "centered"
    (allowing maximum adjustment) before mounting? It's always frustrating to get the derailleur on to
    begin adjusting the stop only to discover there's no enough adjustment room one way or the other.

    Just wondering if anybody has a quick way to deal with this. Thanks.
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "BD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm a bit of a newbie with bike maintenance and tinkering and I'm finding that I am doing more and
    > more swapping of front derailleurs on (mostly mountain) bikes. In order to prevent extra fiddling
    > with the derailleur, is there an easy way to make sure the high-low adjustment screws are
    > "centered" (allowing maximum adjustment) before mounting? It's always frustrating to get the
    > derailleur on to begin adjusting the stop only to discover there's no enough adjustment room one
    > way or the other.

    Front derailers are about the most difficult thing to set up on a bike. One mail order company
    reports that they are the most returned component. You have the combined dimensions of BB, seattube,
    and crank to consider, plus the mounting style and pull orientation. You also have to match the
    curvature with the chainring, and, of course, the amount of pull with the (indexed) shifter.

    I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "centered". If you mean both stops set to the middle of their
    range, I'm not sure how that helps you set up a derailer. When I'm setting up a fd, after mounting
    it (not completely tightened) I manually extend the mechanism, then jam something to hold it open
    while I set the height (relative to outer chainring) and rotation. New Shimanos come with a little
    plastic block to do this, but it's easy to improvise something. This allows you to at least crudely
    estimate the outer stop at the same time by eyeballing the fd cage against the chainring and decide
    whether the mechanism has enough reach to shift into the big ring. You can get a little more by
    rotating the tail of the cage outward, but too much screws up the shifting. It's harder to eyeball
    the inner shifting limit, because the cage is so far above the small ring. I think that requires
    putting on a chain.

    For crank & BB length compatibility info, Sheldon Brown is accumulating a very useful database:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 10:35:46 +0200, "BD" <[email protected]> may have said:

    >I'm a bit of a newbie with bike maintenance and tinkering and I'm finding that I am doing more and
    >more swapping of front derailleurs on (mostly mountain) bikes. In order to prevent extra fiddling
    >with the derailleur, is there an easy way to make sure the high-low adjustment screws are
    >"centered" (allowing maximum adjustment) before mounting? It's always frustrating to get the
    >derailleur on to begin adjusting the stop only to discover there's no enough adjustment room one
    >way or the other.
    >
    >Just wondering if anybody has a quick way to deal with this. Thanks.

    Max throw is achieved when you have backed off all the way on both screws. I think what you're
    really seeing is the effect of crank/BB mismatch, where a crank is installed on a shaft of the wrong
    length, or perhaps you may be trying to use a der for a double with a triple ring; that's generally
    not going to work.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  5. Bd

    Bd Guest

    > > I'm a bit of a newbie with bike maintenance and tinkering and I'm
    finding
    > > that I am doing more and more swapping of front derailleurs on (mostly mountain) bikes. In order
    > > to prevent extra fiddling with the derailleur, is there an easy way to make sure the high-low
    > > adjustment screws are "centered" (allowing maximum adjustment) before mounting? It's always
    > > frustrating to get the derailleur on to begin adjusting the stop only to discover there's no
    > > enough adjustment room
    one
    > > way or the other.
    >
    > Front derailers are about the most difficult thing to set up on a bike.
    One
    > mail order company reports that they are the most returned component. You
    have
    > the combined dimensions of BB, seattube, and crank to consider, plus the mounting style and pull
    > orientation. You also have to match the curvature
    with
    > the chainring, and, of course, the amount of pull with the (indexed)
    shifter.
    >
    > I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "centered". If you mean both stops
    set
    > to the middle of their range, I'm not sure how that helps you set up a derailer. When I'm setting
    > up a fd, after mounting it (not completely tightened) I manually extend the mechanism, then jam
    > something to hold it
    open
    > while I set the height (relative to outer chainring) and rotation. New Shimanos come with a little
    > plastic block to do this, but it's easy to improvise something. This allows you to at least
    > crudely estimate the
    outer
    > stop at the same time by eyeballing the fd cage against the chainring and decide whether the
    > mechanism has enough reach to shift into the big ring.
    You
    > can get a little more by rotating the tail of the cage outward, but too
    much
    > screws up the shifting. It's harder to eyeball the inner shifting limit, because the cage is so
    > far above the small ring. I think that requires
    putting
    > on a chain.
    >
    > For crank & BB length compatibility info, Sheldon Brown is accumulating a
    very
    > useful database: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html

    You hit the nail on the head (both stops set to the middle of their range). Granted, my
    experience is limited, but what I've been able to do so far and with a pretty high degree of
    success is to set the screws to what appears to be the middle of the range and then mount the
    derailleur as you indicated. I use a block of scrap wood to hold the fd open and temporarily
    tighten it down to where the outside of the cage is just above the largest chainring. At this
    point, of course, all I'm looking for is approximate reach to see if the derailleur in question
    has enough travel to do the job.

    From what I've picked up, my dinking with the screws is really pretty irrelevant, but just makes me
    feel better about the whole process : )

    Thanks for the input.
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 14:44:57 GMT, Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:
    > screws. I think what you're really seeing is the effect of crank/BB mismatch, where a crank is
    > installed on a shaft of the wrong length,

    Drat! That's what happened last year with my new crankset; I knew it shouldn't need a new front
    derailleur!

    Oh well. It works now, I won't fsck with it.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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