REC: Braised Beef Cheeks

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Steve Ritter, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Steve Ritter

    Steve Ritter Guest

    I'm making this dish this weekend. Dug up this recipe. Hope
    it'll turn out well. I had something similar in Los Angeles,
    but had never been able to get the "melt in your mouth" part
    down. Here goes... (I'll use Chianti.)

    BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS

    Guancette di Manzo

    When braised, these beef cheeks become meltingly tender,
    with a rich, deep flavor. You may want to check with your
    butcher when planning this dish, since it's often necessary
    to order beef cheeks ahead of time. At Uno e Bino, Cesanese
    wine is used in the braising liquid, but it's difficult to
    find in the United States. A dry Lambrusco or Chianti makes
    a good substitute.

    Active time: 1 1/4 hr Start to Finish: 4 1/4

    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 (12-oz) beef cheeks,
    trimmed of excess fat 1 medium onion, finely chopped 1
    medium carrot, finely chopped
    1/2 celery rib, finely chopped
    2/2 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder 2 cups red wine
    (preferably a dry Lambrusco or Chianti) 1 (28- to 32-oz)
    can whole tomatoes including juice, chopped (3 cups) 1 1/2
    teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon black pepper

    Heat 2 tablespoons oil in an ovenproof 6-quart wide heavy
    pot over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking.
    While oil is heating, pat beef cheeks dry and season with
    salt and pepper. Brown beef, without crowding, on all sides,
    about 20 minutes total, and transfer with tongs to a bowl.
    Pour off fat from pot, then add remaining 2 tablespoons oil
    and cook onion, carrot, and celery over moderately low heat,
    stirring occasionally, until softened, about 10 minutes.

    Preheat oven to 325°F.

    Stir cocoa powder into vegetable mixture, then add wine and
    scrape up any brown bits. Increase heat to high and boil
    until liquid is reduced by half, about 10 minutes.

    Return cheeks (with any juices) to pot and add tomatoes with
    juice, salt, and pepper. Bring to a simmer, then braise,
    covered, in middle of oven until very tender, about 3 hours.

    Cooks' note: • Beef cheeks improve in flavor if made up to 2
    days ahead. Cool, uncovered, then chill, surface covered
    with parchment paper or wax paper and pot covered with lid.
    Remove any solidified fat before reheating.

    Makes 4 main-course servings.

    Gourmet March 2003 Adapted from Uno e Bino
    ---

    Hope you like it.

    Steve
     
    Tags:


  2. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

  3. Steve Ritter

    Steve Ritter Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:18:39 -0500, "Anthony" <[email protected]>
    Interjected.. :

    >
    > "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > I'm making this dish this weekend.
    >
    > Where oh where did you find beef cheeks??
    >

    I tell you. It was not easy. I had actually ordered through
    the guy who has a Mexican Taco truck and sells them soft
    tacos. You know, Cabeza, Sesos, Carnitas, Lengua. He hangs
    out by the Home Depot.

    He has a Butcher that supplies him all the stuff. I tipped
    him well and he got me two large cheeks. I guess it's WHO
    you know:)
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 23:36:54 GMT, Steve Ritter
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > He has a Butcher that supplies him all the stuff. I
    > tipped him well and he got me two large cheeks. I guess
    > it's WHO you know:)

    Anyplace there there's a medium-large Mexican population
    there's bound to be cheeks aplenty at the grocery stores.
    It's the meat in most 'barbacoa' (yes - supposed to be lamb
    or goat - I know).

    -sw
     
  5. "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I'm making this dish this weekend. Dug up this recipe.
    > Hope it'll turn
    out
    > well. I had something similar in Los Angeles, but had
    > never been able to get the "melt in your mouth" part down.
    > Here goes... (I'll use Chianti.)
    >
    >
    > BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS
    >
    > Guancette di Manzo
    >
    > When braised, these beef cheeks become meltingly tender,
    > with a rich, deep flavor. You may want to check with your
    > butcher when planning this dish, since it's often
    > necessary to order beef cheeks ahead of time. At Uno e
    > Bino, Cesanese wine is used in the braising liquid, but
    > it's difficult to find in the United States. A dry
    > Lambrusco or Chianti makes a good substitute.
    >

    <snip>

    What would you substitute for beef cheeks? In Japan in
    might be difficult to find them, but the recipe sounds like
    one I'd like to try. I always thought, though, that beef
    cheeks were supposed to be tender cuts (can I call them
    "cuts"?). No?

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  6. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:42:20 -0600, "Rona Yuthasastrakosol"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What would you substitute for beef cheeks? In Japan in
    >might be difficult to find them, but the recipe sounds like
    >one I'd like to try. I always thought, though, that beef
    >cheeks were supposed to be tender cuts (can I call them
    >"cuts"?). No?

    A nice fatty chuck roast and some large oxtails would be
    the closet thing to cheeks. Cheeks contain a *lot* of fat
    and collagen.

    -sw
     
  7. Steve Ritter

    Steve Ritter Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:30:02 -0600, Steve Wertz
    <[email protected]> Interjected.. :

    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:42:20 -0600, "Rona
    > Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >What would you substitute for beef cheeks? In Japan in
    > >might be difficult to find them, but the recipe sounds
    > >like one I'd like to try. I always thought, though, that
    > >beef cheeks were supposed to be tender cuts (can I call
    > >them "cuts"?). No?
    >
    > A nice fatty chuck roast and some large oxtails would be
    > the closet thing to cheeks. Cheeks contain a *lot* of fat
    > and collagen.
    >
    > -sw

    Oboy. Almost nothing is like cheeks. And I'm glad to report
    super success this time. What helped the most that I got
    some very nice fresh cuts.

    I could not even begin to compare this stuff to anything
    much. It goes well with beer. I'm partial to Whatney's.

    Steve

    Buffering... _69%_ |||||||||||||||||||
     
  8. Steve Ritter

    Steve Ritter Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 20:30:02 -0600, Steve Wertz
    <[email protected]> Interjected.. :

    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 19:42:20 -0600, "Rona
    > Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >What would you substitute for beef cheeks? In Japan in
    > >might be difficult to find them, but the recipe sounds
    > >like one I'd like to try. I always thought, though, that
    > >beef cheeks were supposed to be tender cuts (can I call
    > >them "cuts"?). No?
    >
    > A nice fatty chuck roast and some large oxtails would be
    > the closet thing to cheeks. Cheeks contain a *lot* of fat
    > and collagen.
    >
    > -sw

    I agree here. Oxtails can be close. I love oxtail soup.

    Steve

    Buffering... _69%_ |||||||||||||||||||
     
  9. "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:18:39 -0500, "Anthony"
    > <[email protected]> Interjected.. :
    >
    > >
    > > "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > I'm making this dish this weekend.
    > >
    > > Where oh where did you find beef cheeks??
    > >
    >
    > I tell you. It was not easy. I had actually ordered
    > through the guy who has a Mexican Taco truck and sells
    > them soft tacos. You know, Cabeza, Sesos, Carnitas,
    > Lengua. He hangs out by the Home Depot.
    >
    > He has a Butcher that supplies him all the stuff. I
    > tipped him well and he got me two large cheeks. I guess
    > it's WHO you know:)
    >
    >

    Hmmmm.....two large cheeks. Are you sure it wasn't
    Delta Burke?
     
  10. Steve Ritter

    Steve Ritter Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 16:44:57 GMT, "projectile vomit chick"
    <[email protected]> Interjected.. :

    >
    > "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 16:18:39 -0500, "Anthony"
    > > <[email protected]> Interjected.. :
    > >
    > > >
    > > > "Steve Ritter" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > > in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > I'm making this dish this weekend.
    > > >
    > > > Where oh where did you find beef cheeks??
    > > >
    > >
    > > I tell you. It was not easy. I had actually ordered
    > > through the guy who has a Mexican Taco truck and sells
    > > them soft tacos. You know, Cabeza, Sesos, Carnitas,
    > > Lengua. He hangs out by the Home Depot.
    > >
    > > He has a Butcher that supplies him all the stuff. I
    > > tipped him well and he got me two large cheeks. I
    > > guess it's WHO you know:)
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Hmmmm.....two large cheeks. Are you sure it wasn't
    > Delta Burke?
    >

    Rachael Ray. :)

    Just saw her blasphemize a Croque Monsieur this morning on
    Food TV. Boy. She stood in line many times when they were
    handing out butts!

    I'd hate to see it when she gets older. She'll be built
    like a Brick Shipyard!

    Steve

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