Rests during long rides

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dave Stallard, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Curious to know what strategy people take for rests during long rides
    such as centuries. Specifically, how often do you stop and rest, and
    for how long? I do sometimes get that out of gas feeling, and wonder if
    I could have forestalled it by resting preemptively, much as your
    supposed to eat preemptively (before you're actually hungry).

    Dave
     
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  2. On Tue, 05 Oct 2004 13:18:34 -0400, Dave Stallard
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Curious to know what strategy people take for rests during long rides
    >such as centuries. Specifically, how often do you stop and rest, and
    >for how long? I do sometimes get that out of gas feeling, and wonder if
    >I could have forestalled it by resting preemptively, much as your
    >supposed to eat preemptively (before you're actually hungry).


    The number of rest stops hasn't been an issue. Water and food are what
    counts for me. While there are usually a couple of stops if I'm
    drinking enough water, I've finished a few centuries without stopping
    with no ill effect.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  3. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Dave Stallard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Curious to know what strategy people take for rests during long rides such
    > as centuries. Specifically, how often do you stop and rest, and for how
    > long? I do sometimes get that out of gas feeling, and wonder if I could
    > have forestalled it by resting preemptively, much as your supposed to eat
    > preemptively (before you're actually hungry).


    Me, I normally stop every 90 minutes or so for 10-15 minutes on a 60+ mile
    ride to eat, drink, and stretch; I'm usually riding solo and in no
    particular hurry. On this sort of schedule I can ride 100 miles without much
    stress.

    Recently on a trip to Chicago I found myself having committed to actually
    meeting someone at a place 60 miles away at a specific time that I thought
    would be an easy ride with an hour to spare. Then I got lost, twice, and
    found myself having to actually ride hard without stopping. It ended up
    being 75 miles and I was very tired when I got there, and started having leg
    cramps immediately after (very unusual for me). The constant headwind didn't
    help, either.

    I don't know if my 10-15 minute breaks are pre-emptive or recovery, but I'll
    never skip them on a long ride again.

    RichC
     
  4. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    Dave Stallard enquired -

    > Curious to know what strategy people take for rests during long rides
    > such as centuries.


    Apart from stopping and resting, a few things that help -

    when its safe to do so, ride no hands and stretch your back and shoulders
    out (after you have done a few long rides, this will feel natural even if a
    bit hairy at first)

    change location of your hands on the bars often, and occasionally take one
    hand off the bars and turn the wrist away from the bike and push the wrist
    outwards - extraordinary how tense your wrists get over a long ride.

    if you can handle it, take a foot out of the cleat and fold your foot back
    under you on the seat (great stretch for tired quads)

    and absolutely best, find a similarly paced to companion to share the work
    and the experience with - even better if you can find a similarly paced
    bunch of riders that stick together.

    best, Andrew
     
  5. Dave Stallard enquired -

    > Curious to know what strategy people take for rests during long
    > rides such as centuries.


    That's a broad question in the absence of any conditions. I stop at
    grocery stores whenever I feel I need some food and drink or when
    there won't be any for awhile. How often depends on how long and
    steep the hills are and how hot or cold the weather. You don't need
    to raise your hand and ask the teacher whether you are allowed to stop
    or not. Just do it.

    Jobst Brandt
    [email protected]
     
  6. Michael Fuhr

    Michael Fuhr Guest

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Me, I normally stop every 90 minutes or so for 10-15 minutes on a 60+ mile
    > ride to eat, drink, and stretch; I'm usually riding solo and in no
    > particular hurry. On this sort of schedule I can ride 100 miles without much
    > stress.


    [snip]

    > I don't know if my 10-15 minute breaks are pre-emptive or recovery, but I'll
    > never skip them on a long ride again.


    Aside from their "stop and smell the roses" value, my thoughts on
    rest stops are that if you need them then you're riding too hard.
    I feel better if I keep the legs moving than if I stop, so I pace
    myself, eat and drink on the bike, and keep refueling stops and
    nature breaks as short as possible. I'd rather rest on the bike
    than by the side of the road.

    --
    Michael Fuhr
    http://www.fuhr.org/~mfuhr/
     
  7. Roy Zipris

    Roy Zipris Guest

    On "event" rides--organized centuries or metrics--some of my friends
    like long stops where they eat and kibbutz. Some of my friends prefer
    quick stops--refuel and go. Some of my friends--and I--are in between:
    generally, I like to grab some food and eat quickly, drink then refill
    my water bottles, stretch my legs a bit, then go. I find that I get
    cold and stiff if I stop too long, so the benefit of the breather is
    offset by having to warm up again.

    On my longer weekend club rides (40-60 miles), we usaually stop once,
    about half-way. On the long "event" rides (75-100 miles), I need to
    eat a little bit every ten minutes or so--a bite of bagel does it. I
    always stop at the stocked rest stops on these rides, even if just
    briefly, to get some food and drink and to get off the saddle for a
    moment.

    If you feel that you hit empty, you may be misinterpreting what your
    body is telling you about what it needs to keep going. That is, it may
    be a "refueling" problem, not a "pre-emptive rest" issue. --Roy Zipris
     
  8. RichC

    RichC Guest

    [email protected] (Michael Fuhr) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Aside from their "stop and smell the roses" value, my thoughts on
    > rest stops are that if you need them then you're riding too hard.
    > I feel better if I keep the legs moving than if I stop, so I pace
    > myself, eat and drink on the bike, and keep refueling stops and
    > nature breaks as short as possible. I'd rather rest on the bike
    > than by the side of the road.


    Maybe so, but I don't find climbing restful, and around here (SE
    Pennsylvania) it's hard to go 5 minutes without hitting some sort of
    climb. So I rest by the side of the road.

    I was stunned and amazed (having not ridden in Illinois since 1970) at
    how much farther and faster I went just because it was so freakin'
    *flat.* I probably could have done as you suggest -- should have --
    and just laid back for 10 minutes without stopping, but it's not a
    habit I've developed. Next time.

    RichC
     
  9. Roy Zipris wrote:

    > If you feel that you hit empty, you may be misinterpreting what your
    > body is telling you about what it needs to keep going. That is, it may
    > be a "refueling" problem, not a "pre-emptive rest" issue.


    Yeah, I've been thinking that maybe I need to eat more early in the
    ride, so as to have the fuel available and online at the 3 hour mark,
    where I sometimes feel zonked with my current practices.

    Probably a big part of my problem is just the weekend warrior syndrome,
    though. I don't ride during the week, generally. I need to start
    getting out of the house early for a 20 mile ride, a couple of mornings
    during the week.

    Dave
     
  10. gds

    gds Guest

    >
    > If you feel that you hit empty, you may be misinterpreting what your
    > body is telling you about what it needs to keep going. That is, it may
    > be a "refueling" problem, not a "pre-emptive rest" issue. --Roy Zipris


    I'll add another vote for paying attention to nutrition on long rides.
    As long as the pace is moderate enough so that I don't blow up I find
    that fatigue is more related to my caloric consumption than "resting."
    I think lots of folks really underestimate how many calories you are
    burning and how many are readily available to burn. Over 50 miles and
    I make sure to eat. Less than 50 miles and sports drinks seem to be
    sufficient.
     
  11. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    [email protected] (Michael Fuhr) wrote:

    > I'd rather rest on the bike
    > than by the side of the road.


    On longish rides I might stop every 30 miles or so, I might not. If I
    stop too long, I get cooled down and it takes effort to get started up
    again. Gearing down and slowing down works well for me.

    RFM
     
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