Roast beef help needed quickly

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by skizi, Feb 3, 2006.

  1. skizi

    skizi Guest

    Hi,

    I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner tonight.
    However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe says "until done",
    which does not help. I just want to put salt, pepper, garlic and then bake
    it.

    Thanks for the help. Dinner is supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have
    dinner ready on time.)

    Shari
     
    Tags:


  2. Dusty Bleher

    Dusty Bleher Guest

    "skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    > tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    > says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    > pepper, garlic and then bake it.

    Hit with about 325F for ~20 min/lb. A rounder roast will take
    longer to cook than a flat one. In addition, cooking time is a
    function of how done you like 'em. So shape & how well done will be
    a factor.

    The best suggestion? Get a cheap meat thermometer and roast at 325F
    until just about done to how you want it. Take it out and let it
    sit (covered) for 10-15 min. or so, and it will continue to cook a
    bit...


    HTH!
    DustyB
    San Jose

    >
    > Thanks for the help. Dinner is supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I
    > never have dinner ready on time.)
    >
    > Shari
    >
    >
     
  3. skizi wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner tonight.
    > However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe says "until done",
    > which does not help. I just want to put salt, pepper, garlic and then bake
    > it.
    >
    > Thanks for the help. Dinner is supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have
    > dinner ready on time.)


    Almost impossible to tell you a specific time. Too many variables: shape
    of meat, temperature of meat when put into oven, accuracy of the oven,
    degree of doneness desired, temperature of the oven for the roasting.

    You need a quick-read thermometer like all the supermarkets carry. You
    also didn't say to what degree of doneness you like. It sounds like
    you've not done this before. Rare will be 125°, medium 140°, well 160°.
    My suggestion is to save this roast for tomorrow, do a bit of reading
    and buy a thermometer.

    Pastorio
     
  4. Glassman

    Glassman Guest

    "skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner tonight.
    > However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe says "until

    done",
    > which does not help. I just want to put salt, pepper, garlic and then bake
    > it.
    >
    > Thanks for the help. Dinner is supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have
    > dinner ready on time.)
    >
    > Shari
    >
    >

    Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20 minutes to
    the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every 15 minutes or so
    after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek inside. I like it rare,
    wife likes it well done. I cut it in half when it's pink and bllody in the
    middle, and put the rest back in for another 30 minutes.


    --
    "Don't get me wrong... I'm SNARKY"
    JK Sinrod
    Sinrod Stained Glass Studios
    www.sinrodstudios.com
    Coney Island Memories
    www.sinrodstudios.com/coneymemories
     
  5. Glassman wrote:
    > "skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>
    >> I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >> tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >> says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >> pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >> supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>
    >> Shari
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    > minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    > 15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    > inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    > when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    > another 30 minutes.


    Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.

    A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    abuse.

    Pastorio
     
  6. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Glassman wrote:
    >> "skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>
    >>> I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>> tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>> says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>> pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>> supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>
    >>> Shari
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >> minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >> 15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >> inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >> when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >> another 30 minutes.

    >
    > Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to see
    > the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >
    > A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    > abuse.


    It tha beef abuse of palate abuse? :)
     
  7. Roger Zoul wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Glassman wrote:
    >>
    >>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>
    >>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>>
    >>>>Shari
    >>>
    >>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >>>another 30 minutes.

    >>
    >>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to see
    >>the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >>
    >>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    >>abuse.

    >
    >
    > It tha beef abuse of palate abuse? :)


    <LOL> I remember when you used to post in English.

    Pastorio
     
  8. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Roger Zoul wrote:
    >> "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>Glassman wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>
    >>>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Shari
    >>>>
    >>>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >>>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >>>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >>>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >>>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >>>>another 30 minutes.
    >>>
    >>>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to see
    >>>the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >>>
    >>>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    >>>abuse.

    >>
    >>
    >> It tha beef abuse of palate abuse? :)

    >
    > <LOL> I remember when you used to post in English.
    >
    > Pastorio


    Me too! :)
     
  9. Glassman

    Glassman Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Glassman wrote:
    > > "skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >>
    > >> I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    > >> tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    > >> says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    > >> pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    > >> supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    > >>
    > >> Shari
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    > > minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    > > 15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    > > inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    > > when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    > > another 30 minutes.

    >
    > Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    > see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >
    > A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    > abuse.
    >
    > Pastorio


    Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    her the "no thermometer" method.


    --
    "Don't get me wrong... I'm SNARKY"
    JK Sinrod
    Sinrod Stained Glass Studios
    www.sinrodstudios.com
    Coney Island Memories
    www.sinrodstudios.com/coneymemories
     
  10. Glassman wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Glassman wrote:
    >>
    >>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>
    >>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>>
    >>>>Shari
    >>>
    >>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >>>another 30 minutes.

    >>
    >>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    >>see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >>
    >>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    >>abuse.
    >>
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    > her the "no thermometer" method.


    Otherwise called the "guesswork" method. Or it could be called the "mess
    up the roast" method. No clocks in her house, either I guess. The shape
    of her roast, the temperature the meat is, the temperature of the oven
    (how accurate it is), the degree of doneness desired all affect how long
    a piece of meat is to cook. Poking holes or taking slices is a good way
    to ruin it.

    The simple fact is that the roast will be mauled and gashed by the time
    it hits the table with this approach. It's unnecessary effort and
    unnecessary cutting on that piece of meat. Every cut makes it lose
    juices. Every cut reduces the quality of the finished product. I think
    my suggestion was more useful in the moment and in the future. Take 15
    minutes to go to the nearest supermarket and spend $5 for a thermometer.
    To save a $15 roast. And all the roasts in the future.

    Roasting meats at 350° dries the surface and evaporates juices. The
    reason to let a roast rest after cooking is to let the juices
    redistribute themselves. To let the juices have the time to move through
    the roast to offer a true picture of how done it is. Cutting a hot roast
    still cooking means that you'll get a false indication of how done it
    is. And every time you open the oven door, heat escapes. The oven then
    has to come back up to temperature while the cooking slows down because
    of the heat loss.

    The nature of her questions showed that she is inexperienced at this.
    Better she should learn a technically competent method than to guess.
    The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    more guesses.

    Pastorio
     
  11. Glassman

    Glassman Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Glassman wrote:
    > > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>Glassman wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >>>
    > >>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    > >>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    > >>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    > >>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    > >>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Shari
    > >>>
    > >>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    > >>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    > >>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    > >>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    > >>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    > >>>another 30 minutes.
    > >>
    > >>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    > >>see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    > >>
    > >>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    > >>abuse.
    > >>
    > >>Pastorio

    > >
    > > Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    > > her the "no thermometer" method.

    >
    > Otherwise called the "guesswork" method. Or it could be called the "mess
    > up the roast" method. No clocks in her house, either I guess. The shape
    > of her roast, the temperature the meat is, the temperature of the oven
    > (how accurate it is), the degree of doneness desired all affect how long
    > a piece of meat is to cook. Poking holes or taking slices is a good way
    > to ruin it.
    >
    > The simple fact is that the roast will be mauled and gashed by the time
    > it hits the table with this approach. It's unnecessary effort and
    > unnecessary cutting on that piece of meat. Every cut makes it lose
    > juices. Every cut reduces the quality of the finished product. I think
    > my suggestion was more useful in the moment and in the future. Take 15
    > minutes to go to the nearest supermarket and spend $5 for a thermometer.
    > To save a $15 roast. And all the roasts in the future.
    >
    > Roasting meats at 350° dries the surface and evaporates juices. The
    > reason to let a roast rest after cooking is to let the juices
    > redistribute themselves. To let the juices have the time to move through
    > the roast to offer a true picture of how done it is. Cutting a hot roast
    > still cooking means that you'll get a false indication of how done it
    > is. And every time you open the oven door, heat escapes. The oven then
    > has to come back up to temperature while the cooking slows down because
    > of the heat loss.
    >
    > The nature of her questions showed that she is inexperienced at this.
    > Better she should learn a technically competent method than to guess.
    > The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    > thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    > uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    > breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    > more guesses.
    >
    > Pastorio


    I'm sure your significant other appreciates you. As for me, I use a
    digital thermometer, but in my many years of cooking, I've done plenty of
    roasts any which way, and always had a good meal. I'm lucky. I'm not a fussy
    guy. Put it on my plate, and I'm going to eat it.


    --
    "Don't get me wrong... I'm SNARKY"
    JK Sinrod
    Sinrod Stained Glass Studios
    www.sinrodstudios.com
    Coney Island Memories
    www.sinrodstudios.com/coneymemories
     
  12. Opinicus

    Opinicus Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote

    > The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    > thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    > uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    > breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    > more guesses.


    I haven't seen that on "Good Eats" yet. (Our reruns are about 5 years
    behind.) Where can I get one of those?

    --
    Bob
    http://www.kanyak.com
     
  13. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    "Opinicus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    >> thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    >> uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    >> breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    >> more guesses.

    >
    > I haven't seen that on "Good Eats" yet. (Our reruns are about 5 years
    > behind.) Where can I get one of those?


    ebay has some for $20 + shipping.

    >
    > --
    > Bob
    > http://www.kanyak.com
    >
     
  14. Glassman wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Glassman wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Glassman wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>>>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>>>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>>>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>>>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Shari
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >>>>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >>>>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >>>>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >>>>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >>>>>another 30 minutes.
    >>>>
    >>>>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    >>>>see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >>>>
    >>>>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    >>>>abuse.
    >>>>
    >>>>Pastorio
    >>>
    >>> Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    >>>her the "no thermometer" method.

    >>
    >>Otherwise called the "guesswork" method. Or it could be called the "mess
    >>up the roast" method. No clocks in her house, either I guess. The shape
    >>of her roast, the temperature the meat is, the temperature of the oven
    >>(how accurate it is), the degree of doneness desired all affect how long
    >>a piece of meat is to cook. Poking holes or taking slices is a good way
    >>to ruin it.
    >>
    >>The simple fact is that the roast will be mauled and gashed by the time
    >>it hits the table with this approach. It's unnecessary effort and
    >>unnecessary cutting on that piece of meat. Every cut makes it lose
    >>juices. Every cut reduces the quality of the finished product. I think
    >>my suggestion was more useful in the moment and in the future. Take 15
    >>minutes to go to the nearest supermarket and spend $5 for a thermometer.
    >>To save a $15 roast. And all the roasts in the future.
    >>
    >>Roasting meats at 350° dries the surface and evaporates juices. The
    >>reason to let a roast rest after cooking is to let the juices
    >>redistribute themselves. To let the juices have the time to move through
    >>the roast to offer a true picture of how done it is. Cutting a hot roast
    >>still cooking means that you'll get a false indication of how done it
    >>is. And every time you open the oven door, heat escapes. The oven then
    >>has to come back up to temperature while the cooking slows down because
    >>of the heat loss.
    >>
    >>The nature of her questions showed that she is inexperienced at this.
    >>Better she should learn a technically competent method than to guess.
    >>The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    >>thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    >>uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    >>breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    >>more guesses.
    >>
    >>Pastorio

    >
    >
    > I'm sure your significant other appreciates you.


    She does. And so did the hundreds of thousands of customers in my
    restaurants.

    > As for me, I use a digital thermometer,


    .... but couldn't mention that in your note? Instead, suggested a
    technique of pure guesswork combined with mutilation of the roast, as a
    good way to do things?

    > but in my many years of cooking, I've done plenty of
    > roasts any which way, and always had a good meal. I'm lucky. I'm not a fussy
    > guy. Put it on my plate, and I'm going to eat it.


    I'm sure your many years of cooking have provided many people with
    wonderful belly laughs and belly pains. Just because you'll eat
    anything, it most assuredly doesn't mean that others need to have that
    slovenly standard inflicted on them.

    Have a lovely any which way day.

    Pastorio
     
  15. Glassman

    Glassman Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Glassman wrote:
    > > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>Glassman wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>>news:[email protected]
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Glassman wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    > >>>>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    > >>>>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    > >>>>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    > >>>>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>Shari
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    > >>>>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    > >>>>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    > >>>>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    > >>>>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    > >>>>>another 30 minutes.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    > >>>>see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    > >>>>abuse.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Pastorio
    > >>>
    > >>> Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    > >>>her the "no thermometer" method.
    > >>
    > >>Otherwise called the "guesswork" method. Or it could be called the "mess
    > >>up the roast" method. No clocks in her house, either I guess. The shape
    > >>of her roast, the temperature the meat is, the temperature of the oven
    > >>(how accurate it is), the degree of doneness desired all affect how long
    > >>a piece of meat is to cook. Poking holes or taking slices is a good way
    > >>to ruin it.
    > >>
    > >>The simple fact is that the roast will be mauled and gashed by the time
    > >>it hits the table with this approach. It's unnecessary effort and
    > >>unnecessary cutting on that piece of meat. Every cut makes it lose
    > >>juices. Every cut reduces the quality of the finished product. I think
    > >>my suggestion was more useful in the moment and in the future. Take 15
    > >>minutes to go to the nearest supermarket and spend $5 for a thermometer.
    > >>To save a $15 roast. And all the roasts in the future.
    > >>
    > >>Roasting meats at 350° dries the surface and evaporates juices. The
    > >>reason to let a roast rest after cooking is to let the juices
    > >>redistribute themselves. To let the juices have the time to move through
    > >>the roast to offer a true picture of how done it is. Cutting a hot roast
    > >>still cooking means that you'll get a false indication of how done it
    > >>is. And every time you open the oven door, heat escapes. The oven then
    > >>has to come back up to temperature while the cooking slows down because
    > >>of the heat loss.
    > >>
    > >>The nature of her questions showed that she is inexperienced at this.
    > >>Better she should learn a technically competent method than to guess.
    > >>The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    > >>thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    > >>uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    > >>breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    > >>more guesses.
    > >>
    > >>Pastorio

    > >
    > >
    > > I'm sure your significant other appreciates you.

    >
    > She does. And so did the hundreds of thousands of customers in my
    > restaurants.
    >
    > > As for me, I use a digital thermometer,

    >
    > ... but couldn't mention that in your note? Instead, suggested a
    > technique of pure guesswork combined with mutilation of the roast, as a
    > good way to do things?
    >
    > > but in my many years of cooking, I've done plenty of
    > > roasts any which way, and always had a good meal. I'm lucky. I'm not a

    fussy
    > > guy. Put it on my plate, and I'm going to eat it.

    >
    > I'm sure your many years of cooking have provided many people with
    > wonderful belly laughs and belly pains. Just because you'll eat
    > anything, it most assuredly doesn't mean that others need to have that
    > slovenly standard inflicted on them.
    >
    > Have a lovely any which way day.
    >
    > Pastorio


    I'm sure your pleasant and forgiving, down to earth and modest attitude
    was the biggest reason for your success.


    --
    "Don't get me wrong... I'm SNARKY"
    JK Sinrod
    Sinrod Stained Glass Studios
    www.sinrodstudios.com
    Coney Island Memories
    www.sinrodstudios.com/coneymemories
     
  16. Glassman wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>Glassman wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>>Glassman wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>"Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Glassman wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>"skizi" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I have a 4 pound round roast that I wanted to make for dinner
    >>>>>>>>tonight. However I cannot find out how long to bake it. One recipe
    >>>>>>>>says "until done", which does not help. I just want to put salt,
    >>>>>>>>pepper, garlic and then bake it. Thanks for the help. Dinner is
    >>>>>>>>supposed to be in 4 hours. ( I never have dinner ready on time.)
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Shari
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Nothing is easier than a roast. 350 degrees.... Start out at 20
    >>>>>>>minutes to the lb, if you don't own a timer, just take it out every
    >>>>>>>15 minutes or so after about 1 1/2 hrs, and slice it and take a peek
    >>>>>>>inside. I like it rare, wife likes it well done. I cut it in half
    >>>>>>>when it's pink and bllody in the middle, and put the rest back in for
    >>>>>>>another 30 minutes.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Every cut means loss of juices. And if you're really going to look to
    >>>>>>see the degree of doneness, you need to cut into the center.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>A better, foolproof way is to use a thermometer. No guesswork, no beef
    >>>>>>abuse.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Pastorio
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Correct but if she had a thermometer, she wouldn't have asked. I gave
    >>>>>her the "no thermometer" method.
    >>>>
    >>>>Otherwise called the "guesswork" method. Or it could be called the "mess
    >>>>up the roast" method. No clocks in her house, either I guess. The shape
    >>>>of her roast, the temperature the meat is, the temperature of the oven
    >>>>(how accurate it is), the degree of doneness desired all affect how long
    >>>>a piece of meat is to cook. Poking holes or taking slices is a good way
    >>>>to ruin it.
    >>>>
    >>>>The simple fact is that the roast will be mauled and gashed by the time
    >>>>it hits the table with this approach. It's unnecessary effort and
    >>>>unnecessary cutting on that piece of meat. Every cut makes it lose
    >>>>juices. Every cut reduces the quality of the finished product. I think
    >>>>my suggestion was more useful in the moment and in the future. Take 15
    >>>>minutes to go to the nearest supermarket and spend $5 for a thermometer.
    >>>>To save a $15 roast. And all the roasts in the future.
    >>>>
    >>>>Roasting meats at 350° dries the surface and evaporates juices. The
    >>>>reason to let a roast rest after cooking is to let the juices
    >>>>redistribute themselves. To let the juices have the time to move through
    >>>>the roast to offer a true picture of how done it is. Cutting a hot roast
    >>>>still cooking means that you'll get a false indication of how done it
    >>>>is. And every time you open the oven door, heat escapes. The oven then
    >>>>has to come back up to temperature while the cooking slows down because
    >>>>of the heat loss.
    >>>>
    >>>>The nature of her questions showed that she is inexperienced at this.
    >>>>Better she should learn a technically competent method than to guess.
    >>>>The optimum way to cook that roast would be to use a remote-sensing
    >>>>thermometer that reads while the meat is cooking. Like what Alton Brown
    >>>>uses on his program. Runs about $20 and is good for meats, casseroles,
    >>>>breads and loads of other foods. No more over- or undercooked foods. No
    >>>>more guesses.
    >>>>
    >>>>Pastorio
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I'm sure your significant other appreciates you.

    >>
    >>She does. And so did the hundreds of thousands of customers in my
    >>restaurants.
    >>
    >> > As for me, I use a digital thermometer,

    >>
    >>... but couldn't mention that in your note? Instead, suggested a
    >>technique of pure guesswork combined with mutilation of the roast, as a
    >>good way to do things?
    >>
    >>
    >>>but in my many years of cooking, I've done plenty of
    >>>roasts any which way, and always had a good meal. I'm lucky. I'm not a fussy
    >>>guy. Put it on my plate, and I'm going to eat it.

    >>
    >>I'm sure your many years of cooking have provided many people with
    >>wonderful belly laughs and belly pains. Just because you'll eat
    >>anything, it most assuredly doesn't mean that others need to have that
    >>slovenly standard inflicted on them.
    >>
    >>Have a lovely any which way day.
    >>
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > I'm sure your pleasant and forgiving, down to earth and modest attitude
    > was the biggest reason for your success.


    Nah. It was my unwillingness to suffer the "any which way" fools. I note
    the same attention to quality on your web site. Misspellings,
    mislabeling... unlabeled items...

    A shame. The glass really looks good. <www.sinrodstudios.com>

    Pastorio
     
  17. Glassman

    Glassman Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Glassman wrote:
    > > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>

    > Nah. It was my unwillingness to suffer the "any which way" fools. I note
    > the same attention to quality on your web site. Misspellings,
    > mislabeling... unlabeled items...
    >
    > A shame. The glass really looks good. <www.sinrodstudios.com>
    >
    > Pastorio



    You're a real sweatheart!

    --
    "Don't get me wrong... I'm SNARKY"
    JK Sinrod
    Sinrod Stained Glass Studios
    www.sinrodstudios.com
    Coney Island Memories
    www.sinrodstudios.com/coneymemories
     
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