Rock salt -- sidewalk vs. stomach

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jb, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Jb

    Jb Guest

    Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk in
    a salt mill?
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    JB wrote:
    > Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    > in a salt mill?

    Yes.
     
  3. Puester

    Puester Guest

    JB wrote:
    >
    > Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    > in a salt mill?

    I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added in
    addition to natural impurities.

    A box of kosher or other coarse salt is cheap.

    gloria p
     
  4. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Puester wrote:

    > JB wrote:
    > >
    > > Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the
    > > sidewalk in a salt mill?
    >
    > I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added in
    > addition to natural impurities.
    >
    > A box of kosher or other coarse salt is cheap.

    Ditto, it's not food grade. Who knows what kind of dirty circumstances is it packaged. Salt is
    cheap, why go there.

    nancy
     
  5. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On 29 Feb 2004 14:41:21 -0800, [email protected] (JB) wrote:

    >Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    >in a salt mill?

    I wouldn't, but check the label to see if it's suitable. Unless it says "food grade" assume
    that it's not.

    Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  6. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > Puester wrote:
    >
    >> JB wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the
    >>> sidewalk in a salt mill?
    >>
    >> I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added in
    >> addition to natural impurities.
    >>
    >> A box of kosher or other coarse salt is cheap.
    >
    > Ditto, it's not food grade. Who knows what kind of dirty circumstances is it packaged. Salt is
    > cheap, why go there.
    >
    > nancy

    I am a salt fanatic. And I have to think, back before there were food police, salt was as much of a
    commodity as pepper and spices were. So if someone ran across a mound of salt and dug some out and
    put it in their pouch for trading later, they weren't concerned about 'grade'.

    Having said that, when I was a teen my mom had a box of rock salt in the cabinet in the garage; I
    don't know why. But she was very disturbed when she discovered I'd eaten half of it. Yes, I eat salt
    by the handful. My doctor tells me this is because I have low blood pressure and my body craves
    sodium which I tend to avoid otherwise. Whatever. I just love the taste of salt.

    Jill
     
  7. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 17:48:52 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am a salt fanatic. And I have to think, back before there were food police, salt was as much of
    > a commodity as pepper and spices were. So if someone ran across a mound of salt and dug some out
    > and put it in their pouch for trading later, they weren't concerned about 'grade'.
    >

    I've used rock salt in my salt grinder for years and I'm not dead yet.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  8. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    > > Puester wrote:
    > >
    > >> JB wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the
    > >>> sidewalk in a salt mill?
    > >>
    > >> I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added
    > >> in addition to natural impurities.
    > >>
    > >> A box of kosher or other coarse salt is cheap.
    > >
    > > Ditto, it's not food grade. Who knows what kind of dirty circumstances is it packaged. Salt is
    > > cheap, why go there.
    > >
    > > nancy
    >
    > I am a salt fanatic. And I have to think, back before there were food police, salt was as much of
    > a commodity as pepper and spices were. So if someone ran across a mound of salt and dug some out
    > and put it in their pouch for trading later, they weren't concerned about 'grade'.
    >
    > Having said that, when I was a teen my mom had a box of rock salt in the cabinet in the garage; I
    > don't know why. But she was very disturbed when she discovered I'd eaten half of it. Yes, I eat
    > salt by the handful. My doctor tells me this is because I have low blood pressure and my body
    craves
    > sodium which I tend to avoid otherwise. Whatever. I just love the taste
    of
    > salt.
    >
    > Jill

    I used to use a lot of salt, so did my husband. In fact, he salted things I wouldn't even
    salt...like spaghetti for instance. So much, it looked like snowfall... ;-) Then I got into spices
    and herbs and I cut back on salt because, to me, it covered the other flavors too much. Now I hardly
    use it. I use it in the cooking water for pasta and potatoes, and on some veggies like corn.
    Especially corn on the cob! I can't imagine it without salt! The reason I responded though was
    because before my last pregnancy, when I used to use alot of salt, I also had low blood
    pressure...it never occured to me it may be connected! It was interesting to learn that, so thanks!

    kimberly
     
  9. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    > [email protected] (JB) asks:
    >
    >Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    >in a salt mill?

    Sure you can, but you shouldn't... rock salt is not fit for human consumption... rock salt is mined
    salt before purification... even contains bits of rock that will ruin your salt mill... used to
    melt road ice and will say on the label "Unfit for Human Consumption". Ice cream machine salt is
    finer than rock salt; sometmes fit for human consumption but sometimes not... read the label. In
    any event I don't see teh point in bothering with a salt mill for grinding ordinary salt unless
    you're looking to fool your guests into thinking they'rd getting some rare speciallty salt... if
    you're that friggin' cheap buy water softener salt, a large crystal 50lb sack will set you back a
    cool six bucks.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  10. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    PENMART01 wrote:

    > In any event I don't see teh point in bothering with a salt mill for grinding ordinary salt unless
    > you're looking to fool your guests into thinking they'rd getting some rare speciallty salt...

    Perhaps he's thinking of jumping into the rare specialty salt business. Fancy label on a fancy can,
    filled with whatever salt with large crystals is cheapest.
     
  11. Modom

    Modom Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 23:12:16 GMT, Puester <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >JB wrote:
    >>
    >> Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    >> in a salt mill?
    >
    >I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added in
    >addition to natural impurities.
    >
    >A box of kosher or other coarse salt is cheap.
    >
    >gloria p

    Agree. Potassium chloride is used in some de-icer mixes. You probably wouldn't like the taste. (I
    didn't, anyway)

    modom
     
  12. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 29 Feb 2004 14:41:21 -0800, [email protected] (JB) wrote:

    >Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    >in a salt mill?

    What does the bag say? If there's a note about "not for human consumption," I'd skip it. However,
    salt is salt. If there are no additives, NaCl is, well, NaCl. De-icing and ice cream salt, however,
    are not "food grade" and may contain various impurities you don't want in your popcorn.
     
  13. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 00:36:56 GMT, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 17:48:52 -0600, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I am a salt fanatic. And I have to think, back before there were food police, salt was as much
    >> of a commodity as pepper and spices were. So if someone ran across a mound of salt and dug some
    >> out and put it in their pouch for trading later, they weren't concerned about 'grade'.
    >
    >I've used rock salt in my salt grinder for years and I'm not dead yet.

    Good to know. :) I haven't yet gone through my fancy-schmancy packet of salt-grinder salt, so
    though a *great* deal more expensive than ice-cream salt, the initial purchase is still adequate. It
    would take me a million years to consume 5lb of salt, but if I *did* make ice cream and had a salt
    grinder, I'd save out a couple of ounces.
     
  14. Puester wrote:
    > JB wrote:
    >
    > > Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the
    > > sidewalk in a salt mill?
    >
    > I wouldn't. You have no guarantee of purity and there may be other ice-melting chemicals added in
    > addition to natural impurities.

    The stuff put on roads isn't very clean. They don't put much effort into purity. Not good enough for
    most cooking uses unless you want unpleasant results.

    These salts can be almost any mixture of sodium, calcium and potassium chlorides. Sodium chloride
    comes in reasonable purity (95%+) from salt mines, and without any further refinement that's what is
    put onto roads.

    I noticed that the "salt" that is put onto sidewalks is labelled calcium chloride. On of the men at
    my lodge is a retired civil engineer who specialized in roads, so I asked him about that. He said
    that calcium chloride will melt ice down to -20F where sodium chloride will only melt ice down to
    0F. But because of the price, highway crews use roughly 90% sodium chloride in whatever purity it
    was straight from the mine and add roughly 10% calcium chloride to increase the melting power.

    Anyways, calcium, potassium and sodium chlorides are all good mineral sources. I'd worry about the
    other impurities though.
     
  15. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 01:35:58 GMT, Mark Thorson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > PENMART01 wrote:
    >
    > > In any event I don't see teh point in bothering with a salt mill for grinding ordinary salt
    > > unless you're looking to fool your guests into thinking they'rd getting some rare speciallty
    > > salt...
    >
    > Perhaps he's thinking of jumping into the rare specialty salt business. Fancy label on a fancy
    > can, filled with whatever salt with large crystals is cheapest.
    >
    I hear it's especially good if it's gray or black.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  16. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 17:05:09 -0800, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > The reason I responded though was because before my last pregnancy, when I used to use alot of
    > salt, I also had low blood pressure...it never occured to me it may be connected! It was
    > interesting to learn that, so thanks!
    >
    > kimberly
    >

    Kim... low blood pressure is usually NOT associated with additional salt in your diet! People with
    low blood pressure typically use salt to bring their blood pressure up to normal.

    Correct me if I misinterpreted your post.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  17. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 14:09:28 GMT, Frogleg
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It would take me a million years to consume 5lb of salt, but if I *did* make ice cream and had a
    > salt grinder, I'd save out a couple of ounces.

    LOL! That's what I do. It comes out of my 5 lb bag of rock salt for ice cream making... I haven't
    lived in snow country since I was 15, so I'm not sure if the bags of salt we used to throw on the
    sidewalks were rock salt or not. I remember it was called rock salt. I do know rock salt is mined
    and it's just evaporated ocean, just like sea salt... except it's "aged".

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  18. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 29 Feb 2004 17:02:43 -0600, "jmcquown"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >JB wrote:
    >> Can you use salt which is intended for an ice cream maker or to melt snow and ice on the sidewalk
    >> in a salt mill?
    >
    >Yes.

    Figures you'd believe that.

    -sw
     
  19. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    > > Puester wrote:
    > >
    > >> JB wrote:
    > >>>

    (snip)

    > I am a salt fanatic. And I have to think, back before there were food police, salt was as much of
    > a commodity as pepper and spices were. So if someone ran across a mound of salt and dug some out
    > and put it in their pouch for trading later, they weren't concerned about 'grade'.
    >
    > Having said that, when I was a teen my mom had a box of rock salt in the cabinet in the garage; I
    > don't know why. But she was very disturbed when she discovered I'd eaten half of it. Yes, I eat
    > salt by the handful. My doctor tells me this is because I have low blood pressure and my body
    craves
    > sodium which I tend to avoid otherwise. Whatever. I just love the taste
    of
    > salt.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >

    I can't stand the taste of salt! I even pick it off pretzels! My boyfriend, however, *loves* salt.
    When he cooks, he uses quite a bit of sea salt and I feel so badly, but I can't eat the food. My mom
    never used salt when I was growing up, so I just learned to eat food the way it is. I don't salt
    potatoes, eggs, veggies, fries, etc. and I always use unsalted butter.

    kilikini
     
  20. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 16:55:29 GMT, "kilikini"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I can't stand the taste of salt! I even pick it off pretzels! My boyfriend, however, *loves*
    > salt. When he cooks, he uses quite a bit of sea salt and I feel so badly, but I can't eat the
    > food. My mom never used salt when I was growing up, so I just learned to eat food the way it is.
    > I don't salt potatoes, eggs, veggies, fries, etc. and I always use unsalted butter.
    >
    > kilikini
    >

    Are you sure you're Hawaiian? Isn't SPAM the state food?

    ;-)

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
Loading...