RR: What's the best bike for tech Pacific Northwest riding???

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Gman, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. Gman

    Gman Guest

    Why a rigid SS with 27" wide bars of course!

    A little vaca up to Seattle and I was finally able to bring
    the bike. A friend let me borrow a Saris "Bones" rack that
    worked out very nicely, thank you very much. In fact, after
    the trip I bought it from him.

    First up was the popular Tiger mountain. I was staying in
    Sammamish only about 12 miles from the trail head so it was
    a must do.

    Seattle trails are much more tech than Boise, and although I
    paid for the roots and rocks on the way down with the rigid,
    the climb was WAY fun. For you locals we did the popular NW
    Timber and Preston RR combo, up and down. What a cool ride.
    http://www.bbtc.org/recreation/location_detail.php?location_id=5

    A nice challenging climb on the 32x17/180s of my Surly, plus
    lots of bumps on the way down...I was worked at the
    end...plenty of buff sections to groove on too tho, lest you
    get discouraged, specially on NW Timber. Excellent...

    At the top of Preston a guy looked at my bike and said,
    "I've only seen one or two of those bikes, and I've *never*
    seen one up here!" =)

    Thanks to Jay (a new mtbing friend) for making the Tiger
    ride happen.

    Gab had mentioned that I *had* to do Tapeworm too, a really
    interesting tight-twisty trail next to Philip Arnold park in
    Renton. "The Worm" was a hoot! We hit that and "Mr. DNA"
    (I think). It was VERY tight, lots of roots and some fun
    little man made obstacles...teeter totters, bridges and
    such. Quite cool, although not very clearly marked from
    what I could tell. Tapeworm has a small sign taped to a
    tree and a "begin" directional arrow (the trail is one way
    by design), but I didn't see any other sign-age.
    http://www.bbtc.org/recreation/location_detail.php?location_id=37

    Oh yeah, one other thing. Tapeworm is listed at 200 vert
    feet, but it plays more like 1000-1500 due to energy
    expended on the tech.

    The weather was /beautiful/ while we were in Wa, but on the
    drive home it POUNDED rain, my poor Brooks...it appears to
    have survived the 8 hours in the rain. Pls nobody tell
    Brooks about how I treat that thing or they might never sell
    me another! Well, it IS a mountain bike saddle for
    Chrissakes! =)

    A few very lame pix here:
    http://www.geocities.com/glaprade/Seattle/

    Ride on!
    Gman out
     
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  2. Jimbo(san)

    Jimbo(san) New Member

    Joined:
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    <Gman

    Pls nobody tell
    Brooks about how I treat that thing or they might never sell
    me another! Well, it IS a mountain bike saddle for
    Chrissakes! =)

    A few very lame pix here:
    http://www.geocities.com/glaprade/Seattle/

    Ride on!
    Gman out>

    I would have thought you woould have put a bag over the saddle...

    Very nice stuff!!

    Jimbo(san)
     
  3. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    "Gman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Why a rigid SS with 27" wide bars of course!
    >
    > A little vaca up to Seattle and I was finally able to bring
    > the bike. A friend let me borrow a Saris "Bones" rack that
    > worked out very nicely, thank you very much. In fact, after
    > the trip I bought it from him.
    >
    > First up was the popular Tiger mountain. I was staying in
    > Sammamish only about 12 miles from the trail head so it was
    > a must do.> A few very lame pix here:
    > http://www.geocities.com/glaprade/Seattle/
    >
    > Ride on!
    > Gman out


    To answer your question, the right bike for those trails shore aint a fully
    rigid SS, you freak! In school we called you guys, D.A.R.'s

    paladin
     
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