Some truthful advice about gum disease, deep cleaning, cavities, and wisdom teeth please

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Andrew, Mar 17, 2004.

  1. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Hi all,

    So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    real some of these problems are that dentists claim
    that you have.

    Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    truth or not.

    The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is made
    by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they think
    you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a nice car
    and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this to decide
    what is "wrong" with me.

    Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and frank
    opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who have a
    better conscience and no need to worry about making a buck
    off of me:

    1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this can
    cause tartar buildup inside and next to the adjoining
    tooth and have had suggestions to have them pulled along
    with the top two. What is the truth? Is this is a
    medical danger?

    2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't feel
    any particular pain, although I will admit, I do have a
    mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few weeks
    without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have become
    really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed. However,
    I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really need a deep
    clean? Is there some way I can tell myself how bad my
    teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?

    3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3 dentists
    ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did nothing about
    it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities once again. Last
    week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring a root canal and
    crown. Quite ironically, it happens that 2 of the
    cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the dentist
    recommended its all the more reason to have them pulled!
    Which is interesting, because in one sentence she said
    food rarely goes back to the rear of the teeth so I
    shouldn't feel bad about having them pulled, and in the
    next one she is saying that I have cavities back there. I
    use a home flouride treatment periodically and have
    generally not had any particular sensitivity to foods
    except for extreme cold and hot (which I think everyone
    has). Is there some way I can tell myself how bad my
    teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?

    I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies, that
    you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth beyond
    repair, but then again, if it weren't for the dentist,
    looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing I can spot
    visually is a) my back teeth are in fact impacted but I
    don't know if that's really a problem and b) my gums have
    softened because I was off the flossing for a while, so they
    bleed when I floss now, again, I don't know if that's
    fixable by just resuming the flossing.

    Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Andrew wrote:

    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not...

    Is there a dental school in your area? It will take longer
    but cost less, and you can probably trust the diagnosis.

    --
    Cheers, Bev ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo-
    ooooooooooooooooooo "I read somewhere that 77 per cent of
    all the mentally ill live in poverty. Actually, I'm more
    intrigued by the 23 per cent who are apparently doing quite
    well for themselves." -- Emo Philips
     
  3. Hiero5ant

    Hiero5ant Guest

    "Andrew" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.
    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and
    > frank opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who
    > have a better conscience and no need to worry about
    > making a buck off of me:
    >
    > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > this is a medical danger?
    >
    > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't
    > feel any particular pain, although I will admit, I do
    > have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few
    > weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have
    > become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?
    >
    > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    > a root canal and crown. Quite ironically, it happens
    > that 2 of the cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the
    > dentist recommended its all the more reason to have
    > them pulled! Which is interesting, because in one
    > sentence she said food rarely goes back to the rear of
    > the teeth so I shouldn't feel bad about having them
    > pulled, and in the next one she is saying that I have
    > cavities back there. I use a home flouride treatment
    > periodically and have generally not had any particular
    > sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold and hot
    > (which I think everyone has). Is there some way I can
    > tell myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is
    > this a medical danger?
    >
    >
    > I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    > that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    > beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    > dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    > I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    > impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and
    > b) my gums have softened because I was off the flossing
    > for a while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I
    > don't know if that's fixable by just resuming the
    > flossing.
    >
    > Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.

    OK, there is a standing doctrine that there is no such
    thing as a post that is off-topic in talk.origins;
    however the above places a serious challenge to this
    belief. I hereby propose the following solution to this
    apparent "refutation", and invite others to forward
    alternative hypotheses:
    1) Many creationists practice credential inflation by
    claiming degrees in fields irrelevant to biological
    evolution.
    2) Dentistry is a field unrelated to biological
    evolution (allowances made for comparative
    primatology).
    3) The person posting above has a problem with a
    dentist whom he believes to be twisting the facts to
    suit their own agenda.
    4) Creationists make a habit of twisting facts to suit
    their own agenda. therefore .:C) The poster's wisdom
    teeth are offered as an example of suboptimal
    design, thereby refuting creationism.

    Other theories?
     
  4. There is a song .... Cavities comin' and goin' ...........

    >On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 01:55:48 +0000 (UTC),
    >[email protected] (Andrew) wrote:

    >3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3 dentists
    > ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did nothing
    > about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities once again.
    > Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring a root canal
    > and crown.
     
  5. Andrew wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.
    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and
    > frank opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who
    > have a better conscience and no need to worry about
    > making a buck off of me:
    >
    > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > this is a medical danger?
    >
    > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't
    > feel any particular pain, although I will admit, I do
    > have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few
    > weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have
    > become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?
    >
    > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    > a root canal and crown. Quite ironically, it happens
    > that 2 of the cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the
    > dentist recommended its all the more reason to have
    > them pulled! Which is interesting, because in one
    > sentence she said food rarely goes back to the rear of
    > the teeth so I shouldn't feel bad about having them
    > pulled, and in the next one she is saying that I have
    > cavities back there. I use a home flouride treatment
    > periodically and have generally not had any particular
    > sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold and hot
    > (which I think everyone has). Is there some way I can
    > tell myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is
    > this a medical danger?
    >
    > I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    > that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    > beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    > dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    > I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    > impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and
    > b) my gums have softened because I was off the flossing
    > for a while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I
    > don't know if that's fixable by just resuming the
    > flossing.
    >
    > Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.

    Put it off a few more years. The problem will take care of
    itself. Happy mumbling.

    Tom Faller (with an appointment to have a wisdom tooth
    pulled in two weeks)
     
  6. Yo consumer groups ,,, ask us some dental questions!

    We got answers fer ya!

    JOEL


    On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 01:55:48 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] (Andrew) wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.
    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and frank
    > opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who have a
    > better conscience and no need to worry about making a
    > buck off of me:
    >
    >1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this can
    > cause tartar buildup inside and next to the adjoining
    > tooth and have had suggestions to have them pulled along
    > with the top two. What is the truth? Is this is a
    > medical danger?
    >
    >2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't feel
    > any particular pain, although I will admit, I do have a
    > mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few weeks
    > without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have become
    > really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?
    >
    >3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3 dentists
    > ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did nothing
    > about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities once again.
    > Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring a root canal
    > and crown. Quite ironically, it happens that 2 of the
    > cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the dentist
    > recommended its all the more reason to have them pulled!
    > Which is interesting, because in one sentence she said
    > food rarely goes back to the rear of the teeth so I
    > shouldn't feel bad about having them pulled, and in the
    > next one she is saying that I have cavities back there.
    > I use a home flouride treatment periodically and have
    > generally not had any particular sensitivity to foods
    > except for extreme cold and hot (which I think everyone
    > has). Is there some way I can tell myself how bad my
    > teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?
    >
    >
    >I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    >that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    >beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    >dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    >I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    >impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and b)
    >my gums have softened because I was off the flossing for a
    >while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I don't know
    >if that's fixable by just resuming the flossing.
    >
    >Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
     
  7. Any questions from consumers about dentistry? We have
    answers.

    JOEL

    On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 01:55:48 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] (Andrew) wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.
    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and frank
    > opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who have a
    > better conscience and no need to worry about making a
    > buck off of me:
    >
    >1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this can
    > cause tartar buildup inside and next to the adjoining
    > tooth and have had suggestions to have them pulled along
    > with the top two. What is the truth? Is this is a
    > medical danger?
    >
    >2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't feel
    > any particular pain, although I will admit, I do have a
    > mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few weeks
    > without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have become
    > really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?
    >
    >3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3 dentists
    > ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did nothing
    > about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities once again.
    > Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring a root canal
    > and crown. Quite ironically, it happens that 2 of the
    > cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the dentist
    > recommended its all the more reason to have them pulled!
    > Which is interesting, because in one sentence she said
    > food rarely goes back to the rear of the teeth so I
    > shouldn't feel bad about having them pulled, and in the
    > next one she is saying that I have cavities back there.
    > I use a home flouride treatment periodically and have
    > generally not had any particular sensitivity to foods
    > except for extreme cold and hot (which I think everyone
    > has). Is there some way I can tell myself how bad my
    > teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?
    >
    >
    >I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    >that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    >beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    >dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    >I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    >impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and b)
    >my gums have softened because I was off the flossing for a
    >while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I don't know
    >if that's fixable by just resuming the flossing.
    >
    >Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
     
  8. Thanks for posting this interesting case. I don't spend much
    time on this Newsgroup, but feel I have a few insights that
    should help you make sense of your recent dental
    appointment.

    1. Cavities can come and go. If one dentist uses advanced
    technology to detect decay, say a laser, and the next
    uses 1900 technology, say an explorer, to detect decay,
    the latter will not find any problems until the decay is
    very far along.
    2. Periodontal disease is a progressive disease that has
    times of advancement and times of quiet. It is painless,
    like high blood pressure, until someone tells you you
    have it you don't know.
    3. Floss will help, however if your pockets are deeper
    than 2mm it won't help at all. If the disease has
    progressed to where the bone is involved you need
    periodontal therapy.
    4. Yes, dentists make a living working on crappy teeth, but
    this isn't a surprise to you. According to your post,
    these problems have been progressivly worse, it's time
    to pay the piper.
    5. Wisdom teeth should be removed if they are decayed.
    Depending on the nature of the impaction they can stay
    or go. If they are sideways and any part of the tooth is
    through the bone, then it's best to have them removed.
    Junk can get to the crown of the wisdom tooth by
    following the back side of the tooth ahead of it and
    cause problems, including decay in an unerupted tooth.

    You didn't mention your age, or your over all health. Gum
    disease/periodontal disease is a modifiable risk factor for
    heart diseas and stroke, and others. The infection can raise
    all kinds of problems.

    I hope this was more helpful than some of the other posts on
    this topic.

    Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH "Everbody wants to save the
    earth - nobody wants to help Mom to do the dishes."
    - P. J. O'Rourke
    ~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.dentistry.com/poralhealth_02.asp
     
  9. [email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message news:<43cf64b0.04031[email protected]>...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.

    investigative reports have shown that many dentists do
    attempt to pad their income with expensive scare
    tactics. then again in this sue-happy society, it could
    be a cya thing.

    > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > this is a medical danger?

    don't know about the medical danger, but i'm getting mine
    pulled (not a thing wrong with them) because i have trouble
    getting my toothbrush back there and i believe i'll end up
    w/healthier gums in that area. studies have shown a
    correlation between gum disease (bacteria) and heart
    problems. might be a good idea to get them out for
    preventative reasons.

    >
    > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't
    > feel any particular pain, although I will admit, I do
    > have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few
    > weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have
    > become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?

    i don't know if you can tell about your gums yourself
    because of the shadows in your mouth, but i certainly can
    tell if someone has gum disease when they smile. gums look
    really bright red and inflamed. but might be harder to see
    inside and in back. i think a deep cleaning involves
    separating the gums from the teeth(?).

    i'd get back to flossing--the bleeding should stop after
    a while. also, think about investing in a sonicare. i
    love mine. my gums are better and there's much less
    tartar buildup.

    > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    > a root canal and crown.

    fishy, fishy.

    > Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.

    floss. get a sonicare. visit a dental school, even if you
    have to stay somewhere overnight. should be cheaper than
    unneeded dental work or visits to several dentists for x #
    of opinions. if you do need a crown/cap and it's in the
    back, you can get a stainless steel one for lots less.
    also, try to avoid the root canal--back to that
    bacteria/heart thing.
     
  10. Beachhouse

    Beachhouse Guest

    "Andrew" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    generally not had any
    > particular sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold
    > and hot (which I think everyone has).

    this is not normal. you may be showing signs of deep tooth
    decay involving the nerve. most folks have cleanings done
    1-2 times a year in addition to regular flossing and
    brushing. i'd rather pay the money now than have to wear
    dentures later. your choice.
     
  11. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    [email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi all,

    Hi,

    Have you been having regular very 6 months professional
    cleaning; this could also be done in dental clinic of a
    dental hyguenic program at local 2 yaers college if they
    offer it..usually, they get practise experience foer the
    students..while you pay cheap rate.

    They don't do cavity fillign and stuff..

    Now..I will tell you my expericne and then answer each of
    your question.

    After being broke for 3 years during which I didn't see any
    dentist - I had my wisdown test removd and all cavities
    filled and was having regular dental cleanig prior to that
    period, I went to see a dentist.

    Everything he said sounded reasonable but I was annoyed that
    he wanted me to do some cosmetic work on the tiny, little,
    barely noticeable chip I have on a tooth (as a kid, I used
    to play by opeong bottle with my tooth though my mtoher said
    not to do that because in my mind, i was like..my teth are
    strong... until one day, I felt something and knew that I
    had a little chip; I was smart enough not to do it again.
    BTW, my teeth are very straight -never need brace and uite
    pretty) but when he realized that I had no dental insurance
    - I didn't buy it knowing that I would need any major work
    -he didn't suggest that anymore. I did some filling done
    with him...

    I continued to go to him .. till i moved to another satte..

    Here...I didn research to find the best one for my sister
    who needed urgent care..

    The guy turned out to be the top in his field; When he was
    doing fillings for mys sietr, I was like "What the h**l?"
    because it seemed that every teeh seemed to be needing
    caviti filling but she had neglected her teeth and also was
    lazy to brush properly and so I thought that hers could be
    that bad ..until...it was time for me to dental cleaning and
    I decided to do with him..though my intention was not have
    the same dentist..

    When he told me about needing the cavities filling..I was
    like ..I had been seeing a dentist regularly and how come he
    never told me...

    when I said that, I think he got worried that I would
    confront my old dentist for failing to inform me about
    those and so he said that some dentists wouldn't consider
    those pockets as cavities (as far as I was concerned, they
    were natural pockets on each tooth excluding the front
    ones) and I realzied what was also happening with my sister
    on those fillings. She did have other filings that were
    legitmately needed. I was the one in charge of supevising
    sincc she had a bad experience prior to my arrival here,
    getting ripped off...

    She alraedy had most of her teeth done and so we didn't stop
    the dentist..

    So ..some of yours could be those things that are not
    necessary. So, I suggest .. you ask detail questions and
    understand what tooth need filling at where by getting a
    picture of the drawing of the whole mouth and understand
    what he wanted you to have it doen on each of those teeth by
    referring to them by numbers...

    And this dentist would give me the total cost of the whoel
    mouth when i aksed for it. Instead, he would give me for a
    quater of the mouth...I amy go to him again one more thing
    but I refuse to do any unnecessary work.

    Since he know that I am very informed (I accompanied my
    sister and asked everything done on her and in fact, by
    referring to each teeth with the number after I found out
    about those unnessary fillings....yes, I let them knwo that
    I was watching evry details..), he can't fool me with
    unnecessary work.

    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.
    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and
    > frank opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who
    > have a better conscience and no need to worry about
    > making a buck off of me:
    >
    > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > this is a medical danger?

    Wisdom teeth are best to remove as they push other teeths
    (crowdedness) but if you already have them they have already
    pushed those other teeth but still, it would make it better
    for brushing if they are gone...

    >
    > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning.

    What type of deep cleaning? What's the term? deep planing?
    That would be cleaning under the gum..Unless..you have
    neglected dental care for a long time, your gum are in bad
    shape, I doubt that it would be necessary for just missing
    lossing here and there....

    > I don't feel any particular pain, although I will admit, I
    > do have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few
    > weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have
    > become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really need
    > a deep clean?

    Once the plague has calcized and became claculus, they have
    o be
    removed by professional clenaing since flossing won't
    remove them..

    Why don't you go to a dental clinic at a local college and
    get that regular prof cleaning done first...

    > Is there some way I can tell myself how bad my teeth are?
    > What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?

    If it is really bad, the danger is the health of your gum
    and hence affect on your teeth

    >
    > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity.

    This sounds like those natural pockects ones..I suggest you
    go to dentist with worn out clothes..

    > I did nothing about it. 2 dentists
    > ago, I had no cavities once again.

    That means..those the above comment I amde was likely

    > Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring a root canal
    > and crown.

    > Quite ironically, it happens that 2 of the cavities are
    > on my wisdom tooth so the dentist recommended its all the
    > more reason to have them pulled! Which is interesting,
    > because in one sentence she said food rarely goes back to
    > the rear of the teeth so I shouldn't feel bad about
    > having them pulled, and in the next one she is saying
    > that I have cavities back there. I use a home flouride
    > treatment periodically and have generally not had any
    > particular sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold
    > and hot (which I think everyone has). Is there some way I
    > can tell myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth?
    > Is this a medical danger?
    >
    I have wisdom teeth removed and I recommend that.. but your
    budget is tight, you might want to wait if it is not
    causing too much probelm..I am not a dentis by the way.
    just sugegsting that you have to evaluate your need...

    > I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    > that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    > beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    > dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    > I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    > impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and

    May be need of wisdow teeh removal..

    >b) my gums have softened because I was off the flossing for
    > a while,
    Just for a little bit won't do harm...after next clenaing,
    keep up with it...

    >so they bleed when I floss now, again,

    That's normal...it just emans..you have calculus
    (calcized plague) that needs to be removed via routine
    prof cleaning ...

    >I don't know if that's fixable by just resuming the
    >flossing.

    No..get prof. routine cleaning...
    >
    > Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
     
  12. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    My mistake, nto deep palning but root plaing which is deep
    cleaning ... under the gum....

    If you have not doen regualr prof clenaing for a very long
    time and didn't brush (and floss) well, may eb you need it
    but the key is

    - ask what ti to be done on each tooth and how much
    for each work
    - how much for root planing...usually, half a mouth (top
    bottom) is done once and the seond half done after giving
    a chance for the gums to heal ..

    get a second opinion....
     
  13. Sorry, I know this is off topic...

    [email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > real some of these problems are that dentists claim that
    > you have.
    >
    > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to fix
    > my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had this
    > story unloaded on me before, and it is really truly nerve-
    > wrecking since you never know if they are telling the
    > truth or not.

    I know what you mean. Dentists (and particularly
    orthodontists) seem to be the quacks of the medical
    profession. I've never found myself doubting any procedure a
    doctor wanted to do ("Blood test? Sure here's my arm") but
    now that fluoride in the water have wiped out the majority
    of cavities, dentistry is all about 'appearance' which is
    subjective as hell.

    Get a second opinion.

    >
    > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > to decide what is "wrong" with me.

    Ever done the reverse on your dentist? My hypothesis is: the
    more expensive the office, the more likely they'll find
    something wrong with you.

    I came up with that hypothesis last week, after I saw an
    orthodontist who had a silver convertible BMW, an
    expensively manicured garden and a state of the art designed
    office. I came in to check how much it would cost to
    straighten 4 of the teeth in my bottom jaw (they aren't very
    visible but I wanted a quote). He told me I needed: $16,000
    braces top and bottom (although only the bottom ones were
    crooked), four teeth removed and replaced by titanium bolts,
    an operation on my bottom jaw to lengthen it and several
    crowns. At least $30,000 of work, probably more.

    I'd hate to see what he charges people with obviously
    crooked teeth...

    >
    > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and
    > frank opinion from any qualified prof's on the board who
    > have a better conscience and no need to worry about
    > making a buck off of me:
    >
    > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > this is a medical danger?

    Are they painful? If so, get rid of them. I had 4 painful
    wisdom teeth out a few years ago and I'm very glad I did.
    I'm far more comfortable without them.

    If they're not painful, why bother unless they're crowding
    other teeth in your jaw? Sure they may get tartar, but
    that's what dentists are there for. Use a tartar control
    toothpaste.

    >
    > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two visits
    > that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth pockets
    > have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I don't
    > feel any particular pain, although I will admit, I do
    > have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a few
    > weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums have
    > become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums bleed.
    > However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I really
    > need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell myself
    > how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    > medical danger?

    Deep cleaning? This must be an American thing. In Australia
    dentists clean teeth and give fluoride treatments as part of
    a usual check up but I've never heard of 'deep cleaning'.
    Sounds like a marketing trick to me.

    >
    > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    > a root canal and crown.

    Did you teeth actually hurt when they told you about the
    cavities? Nothing like pain to make you believe what the
    dentist is saying! ;-)

    >Quite ironically, it happens that 2 of the cavities are on
    >my wisdom tooth so the dentist recommended its all the
    >more reason to have them pulled! Which is interesting,
    >because in one sentence she said food rarely goes back to
    >the rear of the teeth so I shouldn't feel bad about having
    >them pulled, and in the next one she is saying that I have
    >cavities back there. I use a home flouride treatment
    >periodically and have generally not had any particular
    >sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold and hot
    >(which I think everyone has). Is there some way I can tell
    >myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is this a
    >medical danger?
    >

    I wish I knew the answer to that one. I wish there were
    truly reliable dentists out there that were capable of given
    an objective opinion.

    Again, I can only suggest getting a second opinion.

    >
    > I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    > that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    > beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    > dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only thing
    > I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    > impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem

    If there's no pain, it's a problem only if you decide it's
    a problem.

    >and b) my gums have softened because I was off the flossing
    >for a while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I don't
    >know if that's fixable by just resuming the flossing.
    >

    In theory, flossing and gargling Listerine should fix it.

    Dancing Blasphemer
     
  14. OK, you got crappy teeth ......

    NOW WHOT???????

    >On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 14:59:01 +0000 (UTC), "Thomas H.
    >Faller" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    >> made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    >> think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    >> nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    >> to decide what is "wrong" with me.
     
  15. On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 15:43:34 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (AllEmailDeletedImmediately) wrote:

    >[email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    >> wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    >> real some of these problems are that dentists claim
    >> that you have.
    >>
    >> Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    >> limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    >> even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    >> recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to
    >> fix my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had
    >> this story unloaded on me before, and it is really
    >> truly nerve-wrecking since you never know if they are
    >> telling the truth or not.
    >
    >investigative reports have shown that many dentists do
    >attempt to pad their income with expensive scare
    >tactics. then again in this sue-happy society, it could
    >be a cya thing.

    REPLY

    Maybe CYA or maybe CPID.

    Car Payment Is Due.

    JOEL

    >
    >> 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    >> teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    >> can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    >> adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    >> pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    >> this is a medical danger?
    >
    >don't know about the medical danger, but i'm getting mine
    >pulled (not a thing wrong with them) because i have trouble
    >getting my toothbrush back there and i believe i'll end up
    >w/healthier gums in that area. studies have shown a
    >correlation between gum disease (bacteria) and heart
    >problems. might be a good idea to get them out for
    >preventative reasons.
    >
    >>
    >> 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two
    >> visits that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth
    >> pockets have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I
    >> don't feel any particular pain, although I will admit,
    >> I do have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a
    >> few weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums
    >> have become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums
    >> bleed. However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I
    >> really need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell
    >> myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is
    >> this a medical danger?
    >
    >i don't know if you can tell about your gums yourself
    >because of the shadows in your mouth, but i certainly can
    >tell if someone has gum disease when they smile. gums look
    >really bright red and inflamed. but might be harder to see
    >inside and in back. i think a deep cleaning involves
    >separating the gums from the teeth(?).
    >
    >i'd get back to flossing--the bleeding should stop after
    >a while. also, think about investing in a sonicare. i
    >love mine. my gums are better and there's much less
    >tartar buildup.
    >
    >
    >> 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    >> dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    >> nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    >> once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    >> a root canal and crown.
    >
    >fishy, fishy.
    >
    >> Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
    >
    >floss. get a sonicare. visit a dental school, even if you
    >have to stay somewhere overnight. should be cheaper than
    >unneeded dental work or visits to several dentists for x #
    >of opinions. if you do need a crown/cap and it's in the
    >back, you can get a stainless steel one for lots less.
    >also, try to avoid the root canal--back to that
    >bacteria/heart thing.
     
  16. Kurt

    Kurt Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > [email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > > real some of these problems are that dentists claim
    > > that you have.
    > >
    > > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to
    > > fix my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had
    > > this story unloaded on me before, and it is really
    > > truly nerve-wrecking since you never know if they are
    > > telling the truth or not.
    >
    > investigative reports have shown that many dentists do
    > attempt to pad their income with expensive scare
    > tactics. then again in this sue-happy society, it could
    > be a cya thing.

    Heh. Speaking of "scare tactics" that reminds me of a
    pamphlet I saw in a waiting room that offered "advice" for
    patients who had questions about a certain costly procedure.
    It basically said that unless you have the procedure done,
    then all your teeth will fall out. It made absolutely no
    attempt whatsoever to explain alternative treatments or the
    progression of problems that might befall the patient who
    declines treatment.

    > > 1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > > this is a medical danger?
    >
    > don't know about the medical danger, but i'm getting mine
    > pulled (not a thing wrong with them) because i have
    > trouble getting my toothbrush back there and i believe
    > i'll end up w/healthier gums in that area. studies have
    > shown a correlation between gum disease (bacteria) and
    > heart problems. might be a good idea to get them out for
    > preventative reasons.
    >
    > >
    > > 2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two
    > > visits that I am not flossing enough and that my
    > > tooth pockets have gotten too big and need deep
    > > cleaning. I don't feel any particular pain, although
    > > I will admit, I do have a mild tinginess in my gums
    > > because I went a few weeks without flossing (my
    > > mistake) and my gums have become really soft, so when
    > > I floss now, my gums bleed. However, I'm back on a
    > > daily floss plan - do I really need a deep clean? Is
    > > there some way I can tell myself how bad my teeth
    > > are? What is the truth? Is this a medical danger?
    >
    > i don't know if you can tell about your gums yourself
    > because of the shadows in your mouth, but i certainly can
    > tell if someone has gum disease when they smile. gums look
    > really bright red and inflamed. but might be harder to see
    > inside and in back. i think a deep cleaning involves
    > separating the gums from the teeth(?).

    You're thinking of gum surgery. By "deep cleaning" they
    probably mean scaling and root planing, which is where they
    numb you up and scrape way up under the gum line.

    > i'd get back to flossing--the bleeding should stop after a
    > while. also, think about investing in a sonicare. i love
    > mine. my gums are better and there's much less tartar
    > buildup.

    Brushing and flossing won't help if the periodontal pockets
    are several millimeters deep. You can't get down in the
    pocket, and it would be painful if you tried.

    My suggestion would be to get checked by a periodontist.

    > > 3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one
    > > requiring a root canal and crown.
    >
    > fishy, fishy.

    A complicating factor is what a dentist thinks qualifies as
    a "cavity". Some will call virtually any brownish spot a
    cavity. Some will call white lines cavities (the white
    lines are basically the precursor to a real cavity). Others
    don't call it a cavity until there's a gaping black hole in
    the tooth.

    This will cause you to get completely different, but all
    technically correct, diagnoses from different dentists.
     
  17. Linda

    Linda Guest

    "Joel M. Eichen, D.D.S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Yo consumer groups ,,, ask us some dental questions!
    >
    > We got answers fer ya!
    >
    >
    >
    > JOEL
    >
    > Joel,

    What is your definition of a dental question? You are
    obviously very knowledgeable, but sometimes (many times) you
    are very dismissive when it comes to some serious questions.
    Even in regard to my own questions of recent weeks when I
    was quite scared about the sudden severe onset of teeth
    sensitivity coupled with parotitis. I had a couple of really
    helpful responses, but was quite surprised at your lack of
    compassion. Dentistry generally is an expensive exercise, so
    people like Andrew have the good sense to question where
    their money is going and if it is necessary. Regards, Linda
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 01:55:48 +0000 (UTC),
    > [email protected] (Andrew) wrote:
    >
    > >Hi all,
    > >
    > > So, I think this topic has been posted before, but I
    > > wanted to get some fresh answers to the topic of how
    > > real some of these problems are that dentists claim
    > > that you have.
    > >
    > > Last week, I went to a new dentist on a new barebones
    > > limited insurance I have (only covers dental exam, not
    > > even basis prophylaxis), and I came out with a
    > > recommendation that I needed $3000 of dental work to
    > > fix my supposedly god awful horrible teeth. I've had
    > > this story unloaded on me before, and it is really
    > > truly nerve-wrecking since you never know if they are
    > > telling the truth or not.
    > >
    > > The problem is that the dentist's bread and butter is
    > > made by telling you you have crappy teeth - and if they
    > > think you have money (I am not wealthy, but I drive a
    > > nice car and wear nice clothes) I am sure they use this
    > > to decide what is "wrong" with me.
    > >
    > > Here are the problems given - I'd like a honest and
    > > frank opinion from any qualified prof's on the board
    > > who have a better conscience and no need to worry about
    > > making a buck off of me:
    > >
    > >1) Impacted wisdom teeth pull - I have 2 impacted wisdom
    > > teeth and I have had 3 past dentists claim that this
    > > can cause tartar buildup inside and next to the
    > > adjoining tooth and have had suggestions to have them
    > > pulled along with the top two. What is the truth? Is
    > > this is a medical danger?
    > >
    > >2) Deep cleaning - I have been told in the last two
    > > visits that I am not flossing enough and that my tooth
    > > pockets have gotten too big and need deep cleaning. I
    > > don't feel any particular pain, although I will admit,
    > > I do have a mild tinginess in my gums because I went a
    > > few weeks without flossing (my mistake) and my gums
    > > have become really soft, so when I floss now, my gums
    > > bleed. However, I'm back on a daily floss plan - do I
    > > really need a deep clean? Is there some way I can tell
    > > myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth? Is
    > > this a medical danger?
    > >
    > >3) Cavities - 4 dentists ago, I had no cavities. 3
    > > dentists ago, nearly every tooth had a cavity. I did
    > > nothing about it. 2 dentists ago, I had no cavities
    > > once again. Last week, I had 4 cavities, one requiring
    > > a root canal and crown. Quite ironically, it happens
    > > that 2 of the cavities are on my wisdom tooth so the
    > > dentist recommended its all the more reason to have
    > > them pulled! Which is interesting, because in one
    > > sentence she said food rarely goes back to the rear of
    > > the teeth so I shouldn't feel bad about having them
    > > pulled, and in the next one she is saying that I have
    > > cavities back there. I use a home flouride treatment
    > > periodically and have generally not had any particular
    > > sensitivity to foods except for extreme cold and hot
    > > (which I think everyone has). Is there some way I can
    > > tell myself how bad my teeth are? What is the truth?
    > > Is this a medical danger?
    > >
    > >
    > >I appreciate any guidance, self-checks, home therapies,
    > >that you can suggest. I don't want to damage my teeth
    > >beyond repair, but then again, if it weren't for the
    > >dentist, looking at my teeth in the mirror, the only
    > >thing I can spot visually is a) my back teeth are in fact
    > >impacted but I don't know if that's really a problem and
    > >b) my gums have softened because I was off the flossing
    > >for a while, so they bleed when I floss now, again, I
    > >don't know if that's fixable by just resuming the
    > >flossing.
    > >
    > >Please provide any advice you have. Thanks.
     
  18. Bill Combs

    Bill Combs Guest

    [email protected] (AllEmailDeletedImmediately) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > if you do need a crown/cap and it's in the back, you can
    > get a stainless steel one for lots less.

    And you can just let the tooth rot for a lot less, too.

    Stainless steel crowns are used primarily for baby teeth
    that aren't expected to last more than five or six years
    anyway. On a permanent tooth, it is no substitute for a REAL
    crown which fits the tooth properly.

    - dentaldoc
     
  19. W_b

    W_b Guest

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 23:15:47 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Amanda) wrote:

    >[email protected] (Andrew) wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Hi all,
    >
    >Hi,
    >
    >Have you been having regular very 6 months professional
    >cleaning; this could also be done in dental clinic of a
    >dental hyguenic program at local 2 yaers college if they
    >offer it..usually, they get practise experience foer the
    >students..while you pay cheap rate.
    >
    >They don't do cavity fillign and stuff..
    >
    >Now..I will tell you my expericne and then answer each of
    >your question.

    Hiya Amanda,

    English not your native tongue ? Just a shot in the
    dark there.
    --

    W_B

    Take out the G'RBAGE for e-mail
    [email protected]
     
  20. Bob Ward

    Bob Ward Guest

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 23:25:04 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Amanda) wrote:

    >My mistake, nto deep palning but root plaing which is deep
    >cleaning ... under the gum....
    >
    >If you have not doen regualr prof clenaing for a very long
    >time and didn't brush (and floss) well, may eb you need it
    >but the key is
    >
    >- ask what ti to be done on each tooth and how much for
    > each work
    >- how much for root planing...usually, half a mouth (top
    > bottom) is done once and the seond half done after giving
    > a chance for the gums to heal ..
    >
    >get a second opinion....

    Learn to type or get a spellchecker.
     
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