Successful chef fired



R

Ruddell

Guest
From today's Globe & Mail:

http://snipurl.com/498z

A Swedish chef said he was shocked to find out he will lose his job because his cooking is too good,
reports The Associated Press. The ABE engineering company in Oernskoeldsvik, central Sweden, will
not renew Richard Norberg's contract because he attracts too many people to the company's cafeteria.
"The number of [visitors] has increased by many hundred per cent," said staff manager Curt
Lundqvist. "We simply do not have enough room."

--
Dennis

Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
 
V

Vox Humana

Guest
"Ruddell" <ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1a89ba44e50b7f8d9899[email protected]...
> From today's Globe & Mail: http://snipurl.com/498z A Swedish chef said he was shocked to find out
> he will lose his job because his cooking is too good, reports The Associated Press. The ABE
> engineering company in Oernskoeldsvik, central Sweden, will not renew Richard Norberg's contract
> because he attracts too many people to the company's cafeteria. "The number of [visitors] has
> increased by many hundred per cent," said staff manager Curt Lundqvist. "We simply do not have
> enough room."

I heard this on the radio. Something seems wrong here. They said that so many outside people ate at
the employee cafeteria that the employees had to wait too long in line and had no place to sit.
SOLUTION: limit the employee cafeteria to employees; let employees form a priority line and wait on
them first; limit the number of outsiders you serve and turn others away. I'm sure there are other
solutions. Why fire someone because you can't manager the business they attract? I think there must
be other issues.
 
R

Robert Klute

Guest
On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 01:14:42 GMT, "Vox Humana" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I heard this on the radio. Something seems wrong here. They said that so many outside people ate at
>the employee cafeteria that the employees had to wait too long in line and had no place to sit.
>SOLUTION: limit the employee cafeteria to employees; let employees form a priority line and wait on
>them first; limit the number of outsiders you serve and turn others away. I'm sure there are other
>solutions. Why fire someone because you can't manager the business they attract? I think there must
>be other issues.

Hmm, I had assumed the outsiders were guests of employees. I hadn't thought about the cafeteria
being open to the public. I

How about make money at it by significantly raise prices and giving employees a discount.
 
V

Vox Humana

Guest
"Robert Klute" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 01:14:42 GMT, "Vox Humana" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >I heard this on the radio. Something seems wrong here. They said that so many outside people ate
> >at the employee cafeteria that the employees had
to
> >wait too long in line and had no place to sit. SOLUTION: limit the employee cafeteria to
> >employees; let employees form a priority line and
wait
> >on them first; limit the number of outsiders you serve and turn others
away.
> >I'm sure there are other solutions. Why fire someone because you can't manager the business they
> >attract? I think there must be other issues.
>
> Hmm, I had assumed the outsiders were guests of employees. I hadn't thought about the cafeteria
> being open to the public. I
>
> How about make money at it by significantly raise prices and giving employees a discount.

Yes, that seems logical. Make the cafeteria profitable. Even if the employees were bringing
in guest, it doesn't seem right to fire the chef. The problem was with the people who brought
the guests.
 
B

Blake Murphy

Guest
On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 14:02:15 -0600, Ruddell
<ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote:

>
>
>
>
>From today's Globe & Mail:
>
>
>
>
>http://snipurl.com/498z
>
>
>
>A Swedish chef said he was shocked to find out he will lose his job because his cooking is too
>good, reports The Associated Press. The ABE engineering company in Oernskoeldsvik, central Sweden,
>will not renew Richard Norberg's contract because he attracts too many people to the company's
>cafeteria. "The number of [visitors] has increased by many hundred per cent," said staff manager
>Curt Lundqvist. "We simply do not have enough room."

'nobody goes there anymore. it's too crowded.'

your pal, yogi
 
W

Wardna

Guest
>A Swedish chef said he was shocked to find out he will lose his job because his cooking is too
>good, reports The Associated Press.

Leaving aside the probably distortion of the item by the wire service, which has a history of
iterating urban legends, Swedish employment law would not have permitted this outcome. The employer
would have retrained the chef to turn out blander food, rather than fired him.
 
M

Malin Eriksson

Guest
"WardNA" <[email protected]> skrev i meddelandet
news:[email protected]...
> >A Swedish chef said he was shocked to find out he will lose his job because his cooking is too
> >good, reports The Associated Press.
>
> Leaving aside the probably distortion of the item by the wire service,
which
> has a history of iterating urban legends, Swedish employment law would not
have
> permitted this outcome. The employer would have retrained the chef to
turn out
> blander food, rather than fired him.

:)

The wire service distortion is rather that he wasn't employed, he had a lease contract for the
restaurant, which won't be renewed. A more accurate version of the story for those of you not
reading Swedish newspapers can be found here
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/01/30/world/main596851.shtml

The chef has had plenty of job offers since, however... And it turns out the engineering company is
about to merge with another company and downsize.

Malin