Suspension adjusted MTB forks?



L

Luke

Guest
The MTB frame gathering dust in my closet has finally seen the light of
day; it'll be my winter project. I plan on outfitting the frame with
rigid forks but am uncertain as to how the 'suspension adjusted'
specification of (rigid) MTB forks effects the overall geometry of the
frameset.

Here are some pertinent specs on the MTB frame:
€ Headtube angle: 71 degrees
€ Seattube angle: 73 degrees
€ Hmmm. The specs for the forkless frame specify a fork offset of
38mm
€ Frame accepts 1 1/8 inch headset.

The completed bike will be used for touring, commuting and casual
offroading; it will definitely not participate in any extreme north
shore antics. Do 'suspension adjusted' forks apply in such a situation
as this? Thank you for your input.

Luke
 
"Luke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:310820052332511309%[email protected]...
>
> The MTB frame gathering dust in my closet has finally seen the light of
> day; it'll be my winter project. I plan on outfitting the frame with
> rigid forks but am uncertain as to how the 'suspension adjusted'
> specification of (rigid) MTB forks effects the overall geometry of the
> frameset.
>
> Here are some pertinent specs on the MTB frame:
> ? Headtube angle: 71 degrees
> ? Seattube angle: 73 degrees
> ? Hmmm. The specs for the forkless frame specify a fork offset of
> 38mm
> ? Frame accepts 1 1/8 inch headset.
>
> The completed bike will be used for touring, commuting and casual
> offroading; it will definitely not participate in any extreme north
> shore antics. Do 'suspension adjusted' forks apply in such a situation
> as this? Thank you for your input.
>
> Luke


It'll jack up the front 3". If you can live with that, then you won't have
a problem.
 
"Luke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:310820052332511309%[email protected]...
>
> The MTB frame gathering dust in my closet has finally seen the light of
> day; it'll be my winter project. I plan on outfitting the frame with
> rigid forks but am uncertain as to how the 'suspension adjusted'
> specification of (rigid) MTB forks effects the overall geometry of the
> frameset.
>
> Here are some pertinent specs on the MTB frame:
> ? Headtube angle: 71 degrees
> ? Seattube angle: 73 degrees
> ? Hmmm. The specs for the forkless frame specify a fork offset of
> 38mm
> ? Frame accepts 1 1/8 inch headset.
>
> The completed bike will be used for touring, commuting and casual
> offroading; it will definitely not participate in any extreme north
> shore antics. Do 'suspension adjusted' forks apply in such a situation
> as this? Thank you for your input.
>
> Luke


Sus-corrected forks will slacken your headtube angle. For touring and
commuting, that's a good thing. It'll be a minute difference, but I'd go
with it. FWIW, I am using an uncorrected fork on a suspension frame,
strictly for trailriding, and I've had no problems with it yet. 80mm stem,
wide bars, not twitchy at all.

--
Phil, Squid-in-Training
 
In article <9OKRe.21659$hp.7948@lakeread08>, Phil, Squid-in-Training
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
> Sus-corrected forks will slacken your headtube angle. For touring and
> commuting, that's a good thing. It'll be a minute difference, but I'd go
> with it. FWIW, I am using an uncorrected fork on a suspension frame,
> strictly for trailriding, and I've had no problems with it yet. 80mm stem,
> wide bars, not twitchy at all.


Thanks Phil and ellis for the tips.

Luke
 

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