terminology/accronyms

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Charlie, May 22, 2003.

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  1. Charlie

    Charlie New Member

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    Thanks to those who responded on line and privatly to my inquiry about whether a Linear LWB was right for me. I remember when you were walking in tall cotton if you had a “ten speed”. I am new to some terminology/accronyms. Would appreciate fill in the blanks or comments.

    ABBREVIATIONS:
    world of bents = _____?
    LWBs = long wheel bases
    CLWBs = _____?
    ASS = above seat stearing
    IMHO = in my humble opinion
    DF = _____?
    SWB = short wheel base
    USS = under seat stearing
    High BB = _____?
    SWB = sort wheel base

    BTW does anyone remember the old two-speed in the rear axle bikes that also had brakes inside the axle. In the 60s my sister had one and I took it apart to grease it. Once I got it put back together - I never understood how - I quit while I was ahead!

    Charlie
     
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  2. since some of those terms came from my mind, I guess I should reply. World of bents would refer to
    the World of Recumbents, the world those of us who are bent prefer to reside in or something like
    that. CLWB = Compact Long Wheel Base, a more recent but not yet established term is MLWB M=Medium,
    think "Vision" coined the MLWB term. DF has 2 meanings, one being Diamond Frame and the other being
    Dumb F**k....the later used when shouting at a car driver who almost creamed you with his SUV
    because he was redialing his cellphone at 30 mph. High BB = BB = Bottom Bracket and High meaning the
    BB is located way up in the air, as opposed to a more sane (bite me) lower position. SWBs and
    Lowracers have the BB elevated much higher than a LWB or CLWB. Higher also refers to the BB being
    higher up than your tummy when you are reclined. ASS and OSS are the same re: Above and Over.
    Surprised you didn't ask about the chipmunk or praying mantis riding positions. Some of the bent
    language comes from the younger whipper snappers amoung us who have migrated to bents from Campy
    Groupo DFs, while more expressions came from the earlier days of INet speak re: LOL, IIRC, IMHO,
    ROTFLOL. The more time you spend on ARBR the less anyone not bent will understand a bloody thing you
    are saying and in time you will begin to write the word THE as TEH.
    -----------------------------------------------------------

    "Charlie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks to those who responded on line and privatly to my inquiry about whether a Linear LWB was
    > right for me. I remember when you were walking in tall cotton if you had a "ten speed". I am new
    > to some terminology/accronyms. Would appreciate fill in the blanks or comments.
    >
    > ABBREVIATIONS: world of bents = _____? LWBs = long wheel bases CLWBs = _____? ASS = above seat
    > stearing IMHO = in my humble opinion DF = _____? SWB = short wheel base USS = under seat stearing
    > High BB = _____? SWB = sort wheel base
    >
    > BTW does anyone remember the old two-speed in the rear axle bikes that also had brakes inside the
    > axle. In the 60s my sister had one and I took it apart to grease it. Once I got it put back
    > together - I never understood how - I quit while I was ahead!
    >
    > Charlie
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  3. I remember the two-speed rear ends. I think they were mostly if not entirely found on Schwinn bikes,
    and the hub was marked with two red rings down the centerline. I never took one apart, but I did
    clean and grease a 3-speed axle once. Boy, that was fun. MB

    "Charlie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks to those who responded on line and privatly to my inquiry about whether a Linear LWB was
    > right for me. I remember when you were walking in tall cotton if you had a "ten speed". I am new
    > to some terminology/accronyms. Would appreciate fill in the blanks or comments.
    >
    > ABBREVIATIONS: world of bents = _____? LWBs = long wheel bases CLWBs = _____? ASS = above seat
    > stearing IMHO = in my humble opinion DF = _____? SWB = short wheel base USS = under seat stearing
    > High BB = _____? SWB = sort wheel base
    >
    > BTW does anyone remember the old two-speed in the rear axle bikes that also had brakes inside the
    > axle. In the 60s my sister had one and I took it apart to grease it. Once I got it put back
    > together - I never understood how - I quit while I was ahead!
    >
    > Charlie
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  4. Jim H

    Jim H Guest

    > BTW does anyone remember the old two-speed in the rear axle bikes that also had brakes inside the
    > axle. In the 60s my sister had one and I took it apart to grease it. Once I got it put back
    > together - I never understood how - I quit while I was ahead!

    Yes. One of my friends had one on his bike along with about 20 pounds of chrome and fins. To switch
    gears you applied light backwards pressure on the pedals, not enough to activate the brakes. Really
    a very clever and effective system.
     
  5. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > The more time you spend on ARBR the less anyone not bent will understand a bloody thing you are
    > saying and in time you will begin to write the word THE as TEH.

    Is a TEH made by the same company that makes the GRR? How does it compare to the TE-SS, TE-EX or the
    RANS Stratus?

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  6. "jim h" skrev...
    > Yes. One of my friends had one on his bike along with about 20 pounds of chrome and fins. To
    > switch gears you applied light backwards pressure on the pedals, not enough to activate the
    > brakes. Really a very clever and effective system.

    The mailbike I rode from 89-91 or so had 3 footgears. Worked fine once you got used to braking the
    required number of times to end up in 1st gear for starting again. Else starting off with it fully
    laden with mail could be a drag.

    M.
     
  7. Rod Dabe

    Rod Dabe Guest

    "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I remember the two-speed rear ends. I think they were mostly if not entirely found on Schwinn
    > bikes, and the hub was marked with two red rings down the centerline. I never took one apart, but
    > I did clean and grease a 3-speed axle once. Boy, that was fun. MB
    >
    I've got one in the collection, "Schwinn Breeze" from about the late 60's or early 70's. It's a
    step through/girls bike that belonged to the girl next door when I was a kid. Her mom gave it to me
    years later when she saw I was collecting bikes.

    Rod
     
  8. In article <[email protected]> [email protected] (Rod Dabe) writes:
    >"Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> I remember the two-speed rear ends. I think they were mostly if not entirely found on Schwinn
    >> bikes, and the hub was marked with two red rings down the centerline. I never took one apart, but
    >> I did clean and grease a 3-speed axle once. Boy, that was fun. MB
    >>
    I think the hubs were made by Bendix.

    --Marshall
     
  9. nodiak

    nodiak New Member

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    Yes, I had one of those 2 speeds as a kid. A Schwinn Typhoon iirc. Put drop bars on it, my first "fast" bike. Also the sturdiest ever. We would routinely get up to speed then hope off our bikes and with a last push send them down the street riderless, into trees or chicken style into each others bikes. It was a real champ at this, never a bent anything. Ah childhood. I sold it for $40 and bought a "lightweight" Scwinn Varsity 10 spd. (what, 40 lbs.?!) and took utmost care of it 'cause it was so pretty in that metallic sky blue. Don
     
  10. Jay

    Jay Guest

    >> BTW does anyone remember the old two-speed in the rear axle bikes that also had brakes inside the
    >> axle. In the 60s my sister had one and I took it apart to grease it. Once I got it put back
    >> together - I never understood how - I quit while I was ahead!

    >jim h at [email protected] wrote on 5/23/03 9:32 AM: Yes. One of my friends had one on his bike
    >along with about 20 pounds of chrome and fins. To switch gears you applied light backwards pressure
    >on the pedals, not enough to activate the brakes. Really a very clever and effective system.
    >

    I recently picked up that part- new.
     
  11. Gary

    Gary Guest

    "Michael Blomquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I remember the two-speed rear ends. I think they were mostly if not entirely found on Schwinn
    > bikes, and the hub was marked with two red rings down the centerline. I never took one apart, but
    > I did clean and grease a 3-speed axle once. Boy, that was fun. MB

    The two-speeds were made by Bendix and the "red band" (as us paperboys called it) was the most
    common. However, there were also yellow bands and blue bands. The colors indicated the gearing. The
    yellow was low and high (my brother had one of those on his bike), the red was low and medium, and
    the blue was medium and high. It may have been the other way around on the red and blue but I'm sure
    of the yellow. Those were really nice for paperboy use.

    I remember when I got a bunch of money from Christmas tips and went down to get a new Schwinn. I
    wanted a Wasp with the knee-action fork and a two-speed "kick-back" but when I got there I sadly
    discovered they didn't make Wasps anymore, in fact they didn't even make fat-tired bikes anymore.
    The best thing they had for carrying papers was a Tiger. Oh well, it was a nice shiny metalic red
    and I thought it was pretty sharp. Got down to the paper station and everyone was admiring my bike
    when someone saw the name on the chainguard. From then on all I heard was "Get 'em Tiger!" They sure
    don't make 'em like they used to!

    Speaking of rear hubs, remember the New Departure? How may washers were on that axle, Rainman?
     
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