The bike grew legs and ran away

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by markle, Jun 21, 2003.

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  1. markle

    markle New Member

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    I went to go and have ride down to the shop this afternoon only to find that by beloved bike had abandoned me. I made the routine police report but I'm sure the have better things to think about.
    Any ideas about going about trying to find my bike. I'm no fool, I'm under no illusions about the likelyhood of finding it but I would feel better doing something. What do the theives usually do? This wasn't a couple kids, they cut through a Kyptonite braided cable, so they were equipped.
    I had a Gary Fisher which is not particularly common so it might be a little easier to identify.

    The sad thing is that I just moved to Melbourne, I'm unemployed at the moment and the bike was the most valuable thing I owned, it's not like I can up and buy a new one anytime soon.

    Any advice will be helpful.
     
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  2. Jeremy Lunn

    Jeremy Lunn Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, markle wrote:
    > going about trying to find my bike. I'm no fool, I'm under no illusions about the likelyhood of
    > finding it but I would feel better doing something. What do the theives usually do? This wasn't a
    > couple kids, they cut through a Kyptonite braided cable, so they were equipped. I had

    Why were you purely relying on a braided cable? You shouldn't use anything less than a D-shackle
    lock (aka U-lock). I bet a possum could eat through a braided cable!

    --
    Jeremy Lunn Melbourne, Australia Homepage: http://www.austux.net/ http://www.jabber.org.au/ - the
    next generation of Instant Messaging.
     
  3. A-J-S

    A-J-S Guest

    (

    I sleep with my bikes (Only the special ones, same room different beds).

    Personally Paranoid and now even more so.

    I wish you luck about getting a return and sympathy for the loss. Police = joke in my opinion. I can
    list at least ten examples of being seriously let down by them not doing their job. Assault and
    robs, theft from cars (Witnessed by many people, plate details taken, Police returned goods in a few
    hour but did not take any action) and quite a few other occasions.

    AJS

    "markle" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I went to go and have ride down to the shop this afternoon only to find that by beloved bike had
    > abandoned me. I made the routine police report but I'm sure the have better things to think about.
    > Any ideas about going about trying to find my bike. I'm no fool, I'm under no illusions about the
    > likelyhood of finding it but I would feel better doing something. What do the theives usually do?
    > This wasn't a couple kids, they cut through a Kyptonite braided cable, so they were equipped. I
    > had a Gary Fisher which is not particularly common so it might be a little easier to identify.
    >
    > The sad thing is that I just moved to Melbourne, I'm unemployed at the moment and the bike was the
    > most valuable thing I owned, it's not like I can up and buy a new one anytime soon.
    >
    > Any advice will be helpful.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  4. Steppenw

    Steppenw Guest

    Agree. Police = joke. Last year, at least 8 high-end bikes (both road and MTB) stolen from
    government offices in the space of 2 weeks. This was just at Defence. I estimate the replacement
    cost of these - at least $20k. The thieves were brazen, they were organised, and they were
    efficient. They'd roll up on a pair of dungers they'd ripped off at the university and snip the
    locks with a pair of cable cutters (secreted in a backpack) while one stood watch. Then they'd
    abandon the crap bikes, and take off on the good ones. They looked like bicyclists - not thieves.
    Everyone filed a report. No-one received a follow up, and needless to say, no-one's bike has ever
    been recovered. I've learned from this experience that the minimum defence against thieves is a
    D-lock, and that you can't rely on anyone but yourself to protect your gear. If you commute on
    anything of value, park it next to your desk (and even then you should make sure it's securely
    locked). I don't see the police taking the same pride in property theft that they do with traffic
    infringements and 'anti-terror' initiatives. Maybe we should pay them a bonus for results.
     
  5. Last year my girlfriends BMX was stolen from Sydney University. She told me she went to the security
    office and reported it stolen. The "nice man" at University Security said they would do everything
    they could to recover it. I asked her if she told them the correct make of the bike and she said
    "Oh, they didn't ask for a description of the bike, just my phone number".
     
  6. Twisties

    Twisties New Member

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    the security guards didnt need the make of hte bike, they new exactly what it looked like, after they were the ones who took it.
     
  7. Mark B

    Mark B Guest

    Luther Blissett wrote:
    > Last year my girlfriends BMX was stolen from Sydney University. She told me she went to the
    > security office and reported it stolen. The "nice man" at University Security said they would do
    > everything they could to recover it. I asked her if she told them the correct make of the bike and
    > she said "Oh, they didn't ask for a description of the bike, just my phone number".

    You like blondes hey?
     
  8. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    "Jeremy Lunn" wrote

    > Why were you purely relying on a braided cable? You shouldn't use anything less than a D-shackle
    > lock (aka U-lock). I bet a possum
    could
    > eat through a braided cable!

    My, what helpful advice from Jeremy.

    Theo
     
  9. Al

    Al Guest

    I know that this is stating the obvious, but you've tried the local Smack Converters and pawn shops?
    People I know have (very) occasionally had success doing this. BTW if you do find your bike in one
    of these establishments, expect a fight to get it back from them.

    PS, sorry such a crap thing happened to you.

    "Theo Bekkers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Jeremy Lunn" wrote
    >
    > > Why were you purely relying on a braided cable? You shouldn't use anything less than a D-shackle
    > > lock (aka U-lock). I bet a possum
    > could
    > > eat through a braided cable!
    >
    > My, what helpful advice from Jeremy.
    >
    > Theo
     
  10. Mark B wrote:

    > Luther Blissett wrote:
    >
    >> Last year my girlfriends BMX was stolen from Sydney University. She told me she went to the
    >> security office and reported it stolen. The "nice man" at University Security said they would do
    >> everything they could to recover it. I asked her if she told them the correct make of the bike
    >> and she said "Oh, they didn't ask for a description of the bike, just my phone number".
    >
    >
    > You like blondes hey?
    >

    I won't answer that for fear I might castrate myself.
     
  11. markle

    markle New Member

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    Thanks fellas for the advice.
    I was mainly feeling sorry for myself, especially since I was just getting into cycling.
    Well who knows your luck in the big city.
     
  12. Twisties

    Twisties New Member

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    city: BIG
    luck: :(
     
  13. Kingsley

    Kingsley Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 21:21:22 +1000, Al wrote:

    > I know that this is stating the obvious, but you've tried the local Smack Converters and pawn
    > shops? People I know have (very) occasionally had success doing this. BTW if you do find your bike
    > in one of these establishments, expect a fight to get it back from them.

    If you can proove that the bike is yours, under (NSW at least) 2nd-hand laws, they are required to
    sell it back to you at their cost price. There is no obligation to give it back or anything, you
    must buy it.

    So there shouldn't be any fight.

    -kt
     
  14. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    "kingsley" wrote

    > If you can proove that the bike is yours, under (NSW at least)
    2nd-hand
    > laws, they are required to sell it back to you at their cost price. There is no obligation to give
    > it back or anything, you must buy it.
    >
    > So there shouldn't be any fight.

    Good God! I believe the law in WA is that it's stolen property, call the Police and they will not
    only confiscate it from the Burglary Converters but also give the dealer a very hard time. Having to
    buy your own property back from a "fence" is ridiculous.

    Theo
     
  15. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Theo Bekkers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : "kingsley" wrote
    :
    : > If you can proove that the bike is yours, under (NSW at least)
    : 2nd-hand
    : > laws, they are required to sell it back to you at their cost price. There is no obligation to
    : > give it back or anything, you must buy it.
    : >
    : > So there shouldn't be any fight.
    :
    : Good God! I believe the law in WA is that it's stolen property, call the Police and they will not
    : only confiscate it from the Burglary Converters but also give the dealer a very hard time. Having
    : to buy your own property back from a "fence" is ridiculous.
    :
    : Theo
    :
    :

    I would check on that. The law in NSW is definitely there to protect the pawn shops from receiving
    charges. Although they can be charged if they are knowingly receiving. ie if the same whacked out
    smack head keeps bringing in $5000 bikes then they can get into trouble as they should be aware they
    are most likely sus.

    Pete
     
  16. Al

    Al Guest

    In Victoria you apply to the registrar of the Magistrate's court and if you can prove the goods are
    yours, they will order the pawn shop to hand them over. The dealer can of course contest and it then
    goes to a magistrate. In reality however, an unscrupulous pawn shop (of course most are run by model
    citizens who'd never deal in stolen goods - right?) will try and bluff or stonewall you, working on
    the theory that a number of people will just give up.

    For more information go to http://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/cbav/fairsite.nsf/pages/of_shop_SHD#stolen

    "John Doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Theo Bekkers" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > : "kingsley" wrote
    > :
    > : > If you can proove that the bike is yours, under (NSW at least)
    > : 2nd-hand
    > : > laws, they are required to sell it back to you at their cost price. There is no obligation to
    > : > give it back or anything, you must buy it.
    > : >
    > : > So there shouldn't be any fight.
    > :
    > : Good God! I believe the law in WA is that it's stolen property, call the Police and they will
    > : not only confiscate it from the Burglary Converters but also give the dealer a very hard time.
    > : Having to buy your own property back from a "fence" is ridiculous.
    > :
    > : Theo
    > :
    > :
    >
    > I would check on that. The law in NSW is definitely there to protect the pawn shops from receiving
    > charges. Although they can be charged if they
    are
    > knowingly receiving. ie if the same whacked out smack head keeps bringing in $5000 bikes then they
    > can get into trouble as they should be aware they are most likely sus.
    >
    > Pete
     
  17. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    Al" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    : In Victoria you apply to the registrar of the Magistrate's court and if
    you
    : can prove the goods are yours, they will order the pawn shop to hand them over.

    That seems much fairer. I could not believe (well I did believe but was astounded) that even though
    you could prove the goods were yours the second hand dealer had legal title.
     
  18. Al wrote:

    > In Victoria you apply to the registrar of the Magistrate's court and if you can prove the goods
    > are yours, they will order the pawn shop to hand them over. The dealer can of course contest and
    > it then goes to a magistrate. In reality however, an unscrupulous pawn shop (of course most are
    > run by model citizens who'd never deal in stolen goods - right?) will try and bluff or stonewall
    > you, working on the theory that a number of people will just give up.
    >
    > For more information go to
    > http://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/cbav/fairsite.nsf/pages/of_shop_SHD#stolen

    *Laugh* Yes, the owners of the second hand stores all claim to be virtuous, upright and unduly
    accused, proudly displaying their rules, regulations and requirements.

    First thing that happens when your bike gets stolen -- the Police give you a list of 2nd hand
    dealers and tell you to go visit them all looking for it.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
     
  19. markle

    markle New Member

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    Any likely suspects in the SE subs area?
     
  20. Jeremy Lunn

    Jeremy Lunn Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, crustofcrust wrote:
    > I had my bike chain to my front fence with something called "hacksaw proof chain". The thieves cut
    > clean through with bolt cutters, I don't think a D-lock would have stopped them.

    Depends what sort of D-lock and how expensive your bike is. If you've ever seen the lock they use on
    Cecil Walker in the city (if they still use it), they tried to test it by cutting through with a
    hacksaw. They blunted three blades without getting anywhere so they conluded that they may as well
    use it to lock the shop. I doubt that they could cut through a D-lock with bolt cutters.

    I have heard that they can use car jacks to break them open, though the more expensive brand name
    D-locks have measures to counter that. Personally I wouldn't leave my bike chained to the front
    fence at home anyway. I'd keep it inside.

    --
    Jeremy Lunn Melbourne, Australia Homepage: http://www.austux.net/ http://www.jabber.org.au/ - the
    next generation of Instant Messaging.
     
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