thickening agents

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Denise, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Denise

    Denise Guest

    I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most need a
    thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available) here in the
    UK?
    Regards,
    Denise





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  2. Protein powder?

    "Denise" <[email protected]*nospam*hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most need a
    > thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available) here in the
    > UK?
    > Regards,
    > Denise
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ................................................................
    > Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access
    > >>>> at http://www.TitanNews.com <<<<

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    >
     
  3. Nicky

    Nicky Guest

    "Denise" <[email protected]*nospam*hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most need a
    > thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available) here in the
    > UK?


    Xanthan gum. Got mine from Tescos, and several online low-carb sites do it.
    If you look online, you can find Guar gum too.

    Nicky.

    --
    A1c 10.5/5.6/<6 T2 DX 05/2004
    1g Metformin, 100ug Thyroxine
    95/72/72Kg
     
  4. FOB

    FOB Guest

    Guar or Xanthan gum will thicken anything. You can also thicken soups by
    taking some of the broth and cooked veggies and puree them in the blender.
    Here are a few of my favorite LC soups, no extra thickening needed for them,
    they are all meal in a bowl type soups. The sausage soup is my SO's
    favorite, the eggplant soup is my favorite.

    German Cheese Soup

    2 lbs. ground beef
    1 Bunch leeks, cleaned and cut into rings, discard stems 24 g net carbs
    2 cans beef broth (14 oz cans)
    Kale ( one half of a large bunch) 20 g (I use the whole bunch)
    3 soup cans water
    1 (8 oz.) pkg. Cream Cheese 6 g
    salt and pepper to taste
    1 pkg. seasoned cheese (The originator of this recipe was from Germany, so
    you have to find your own brand of cheese, most anything will do)

    Brown ground beef with seasoned salt and garlic powder or fresh garlic to
    taste. Add leeks and sauté till tender. Add beef broth, water, kale, salt
    and pepper. Cook slowly for 1 to 2 hours. Add cut up cream cheese and
    seasoned cheese. Simmer until cheese is melted.

    Sausage Soup Olé by MarieAnn

    1 lb. smoked sausage(cut in 1 in. slices, or diced, as you prefer) 12carbs
    1 can(14-15 oz.)stewed tomatoes 27-4=23
    1 can(14-15 oz.) sliced or diced tomatoes in juice 14
    1 can(15-16 oz.)pinto beans, undrained 65-20=45 You can use black soy
    beans and reduce the carbs here to 1 net carb..
    1 can(14 oz.) chicken broth
    1/2 of a medium head of cabbage, chopped fairly large 25-10=15
    1 Tbs. chili powder 4-3=1
    (2 tsp. sugar or substitute) 8 if used
    1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced 0
    1 medium size onion,chopped 9-2=7
    2 cloves garlic, minced 1

    TOTAL 168-39=129, makes approx 3 quarts, 6 2-cup servings. Per serving
    426 cals, 29 g fat, 21 net carbs-14 with the soy beans, 17 g protein.

    Put all ingredients in soup pot. This will look to thick to be soup, but
    will become less thick as cabbage cooks down. Lower heat and simmer from 30
    to 60 minutes, depending on how soft you prefer your cabbage.

    Eggplant Supper Soup

    2 tbs. butter 200 cal, 0 carb
    2 tbs.olive oil or salad oil 200 cal, 0 carb
    1 medium-sized onion, chopped 42 cal, 9 carb, - 2 fiber, net 7
    1 lb. lean ground beef 1223 cal, 0 carb, 83 g fat, prot 111
    1 medium eggplant (about 1 lb.), unpeeled, diced 142 cal, carb 33, -14
    fiber, net 19, prot 6
    1 clove garlic, minced or pressed 4 carb, 1 carb
    1/2 C. each chopped carrot and sliced celery 24 cal, carb 6, -2 fiber, net
    4, prot 1
    1 large can (about 28 ounces) tomatoes 232 cal, carb 56, -8 fiber, net 48,
    prot 8
    2 cans (about 14 1/2 ounces each) beef broth 8 cal, 2 carb
    1 tsp. Splenda (optional-I omit this)
    1/2 tsp. each pepper and ground nutmeg
    1 tbs. minced parsley negligible
    Salt
    Grated Parmesan cheese

    Melt butter in oil in a deep 4- to 5-quart pan over medium heat. Add onion
    and cook, stirring often, until soft (about 5 minutes). Crumble in beef and
    cook, stirring often, until lightly browned. Stir in eggplant, garlic,
    carrot and celery. Cut up tomatoes; stir in tomatoes and their liquid,
    broth, sugar, pepper, and nutmeg. Bring to a boil over high heat; then
    reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about 30 minutes. Add parsley, season to
    taste with salt. To serve, ladle soup into bowls; offer cheese to add to
    taste. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

    Totals, 2075 cal, 54 g fat, 81 net carb, 126 prot,






    In news:[email protected],
    Denise <[email protected]*nospam*hotmail.com> stated
    | I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most
    | need a thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available)
    | here in the UK?
    | Regards,
    | Denise
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | ................................................................
    | Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access
    | >>>> at http://www.TitanNews.com <<<<
    | -=Every Newsgroup - Anonymous, UNCENSORED, BROADBAND Downloads=-
     
  5. Larry Dow

    Larry Dow Guest

    "Denise" <[email protected]*nospam*hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most need a
    > thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available) here in the
    > UK?
    > Regards,
    > Denise
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ................................................................
    > Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access
    > >>>> at http://www.TitanNews.com <<<<

    > -=Every Newsgroup - Anonymous, UNCENSORED, BROADBAND Downloads=-



    My wife has seen a lot of recipes on line that recommend ThickenThin
    not/Starch and ThickenThin not/Sugar. They are both different mixtures of
    gums - acacia, guar, carob, and xantham. They are made by Expert Foods,
    Inc. and she just bought some at www.netrition.com. She has not tried them
    yet. We just got them this past weekend. After she uses them, I'll post an
    update. We are in the US. I don't know if you can get them from some place
    in the UK or not.

    Larry
     
  6. Sherry

    Sherry Guest

    "Larry Dow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My wife has seen a lot of recipes on line that recommend ThickenThin
    > not/Starch and ThickenThin not/Sugar. They are both different mixtures of
    > gums - acacia, guar, carob, and xantham. They are made by Expert Foods,
    > Inc. and she just bought some at www.netrition.com. She has not tried

    them
    > yet. We just got them this past weekend. After she uses them, I'll post

    an
    > update. We are in the US. I don't know if you can get them from some

    place
    > in the UK or not.


    Like your wife, I've seen quite a few recipes calling for these also. Only
    I haven't ordered them yet - so I will watch for your update, thanks Larry
    :).

    (At the moment I "thicken" with cream, sour cream, or cheese, depending on
    the gravy/sauce.)

    --
    Merry Christmas,
    Sherry
    364/297/195 (4/3/05)
    http://lowcarb.owly.net
     
  7. Xanathan gum as previously suggested works great and is very cost
    effective. I wouldn't throw money away buying expensive products like
    thick/thin.
     
  8. FOB

    FOB Guest

    I used the Not Starch and it is good, but then I bought a jar of Guar gum
    (cheaper) and it works fine, too.

    In news:[email protected],
    Larry Dow <[email protected]> stated
    |
    |
    | My wife has seen a lot of recipes on line that recommend ThickenThin
    | not/Starch and ThickenThin not/Sugar. They are both different
    | mixtures of gums - acacia, guar, carob, and xantham. They are made
    | by Expert Foods, Inc. and she just bought some at www.netrition.com.
    | She has not tried them yet. We just got them this past weekend.
    | After she uses them, I'll post an update. We are in the US. I don't
    | know if you can get them from some place in the UK or not.
    |
    | Larry
     
  9. Bob Geary

    Bob Geary Guest

    Denise wrote:
    > I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most
    > need a thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available)
    > here in the UK?
    > Regards,
    > Denise


    I've been using egg yolks in cream-based soups with good results - I'll use
    maybe four or five egg yolks for a good-sized pot of soup. You need to be
    careful not to curdle the yolks (add a small amount of hot soup to the
    yolks, stir it in well, add a little more hot soup, stir that well, and when
    the soup/yolk mixture is hot, it's safe to add the mixture to the soup
    kettle and mix it in.) I don't really like the mouthfeel of
    xanthan-gum-thickened soups (I wasn't a big fan of cornstarch as a thickener
    either, even before cornstarch became verboten). The eggs don't make things
    as thick as starch or gum or a flour/butter roux would, but they make it
    smoother, and richer, and add a good hit of protein too. (Cream of wild
    mushroom soup.... mmmmm, must make that this weekend...)
     
  10. Denise wrote:
    >
    > I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most need a
    > thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily available) here in the
    > UK?


    Thickening in soup? Is that one question or two? Soup is supposed to
    be thin so a lot of simmering will give time for the natural gelatin in
    whatever meat and bones are used to gell somewhat. Wouldn't work
    with a vegitarian soup, but that's how consume gells.
     
  11. Denise

    Denise Guest

    Thanks to everyone who took time and trouble to reply. I'll let you know how
    I get on! :)
    Regards,
    Denise





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  12. Doug Freyburger wrote:

    > Denise wrote:
    >
    >> I'm trying to find some suitable soup recipes and struggling! Most
    >> need a thickening agent. What should I use (that is easily
    >> available) here in the UK?


    Most thickeners rely on matrices of starch. Starches are carbs. You have
    some choices to make if you want traditional soups. If not, there are
    others that can add thickness, but not with the same mouthfeel. Food
    gums like xanthan and guar and others can give the soup a heavier
    mouthfeel, but it has a more gelid feel rather than merely as a
    thickened liquid.

    Egg whisked in can thicken, but that's a tricky technique and needs care
    doing it. A liaison needs to be made (mix some of the liquid to be
    thickened with the egg) and whisked into the hot soup to thicken. But it
    can't be brought to a boil or the eggs might coagulate and it looks like
    somebody already ate it once.

    > Thickening in soup? Is that one question or two? Soup is supposed
    > to be thin so a lot of simmering will give time for the natural
    > gelatin in whatever meat and bones are used to gel somewhat.


    That's one kind of soup. Gelatin in soups gives a slight
    improvement in "body" so it has a denser mouthfeel. And that would only
    be a broth or stock-based soup. Others, like cream soups, have
    thickeners including potatoes and other starchy vegetables, starches
    mixed with fats or water-based liquids, purees of vegetables, eggs,
    reductions and still others.

    Others are thin and cook for a short time, like fish and other seafood
    soups.

    *Some* soup is supposed to be thin.

    > Wouldn't work with a vegetarian soup, but that's how consomme' gells.


    Soup recipes. Not jellied consomme'. And, in any event, the practical
    modern kitchen more often uses gelatin to gel consomme' rather than to
    go through all the difficulty of making a stock, clarifying it with a
    "raft" and reducing it.

    Pastorio
     
  13. Nomad

    Nomad Guest

    On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 18:58:34 -0500, "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Most thickeners rely on matrices of starch. Starches are carbs. You have
    >some choices to make if you want traditional soups. If not, there are
    >others that can add thickness, but not with the same mouthfeel. Food
    >gums like xanthan and guar and others can give the soup a heavier
    >mouthfeel, but it has a more gelid feel rather than merely as a
    >thickened liquid.


    snip snip
    >
    >Pastorio


    Is there a noted difference between Guar and Xanthum as to their
    uses? Does one mix / dissolve better than another, or is one
    better than the other in certain recipes? I use Guar
    and if I mix it in a dry mix before adding liquids, it does fine but I
    haven't tried Xanthum. If you are mixing either with liquids, is
    there a secret to keep it from "clumping"?

    Thanks
     
  14. Nomad wrote:
    > "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Most thickeners rely on matrices of starch. Starches are carbs. You have
    >>some choices to make if you want traditional soups. If not, there are
    >>others that can add thickness, but not with the same mouthfeel. Food
    >>gums like xanthan and guar and others can give the soup a heavier
    >>mouthfeel, but it has a more gelid feel rather than merely as a
    >>thickened liquid.

    >
    > snip snip
    >
    >>Pastorio

    >
    > Is there a noted difference between Guar and Xanthum as to their
    > uses? Does one mix / dissolve better than another, or is one
    > better than the other in certain recipes?


    I've found them essentially interchangeable with the proviso that it
    takes differing amount of each of the gums to achieve similar results.
    They can't be substituted one-for-one.

    Here's everything about gums all in one place, probably too much. But
    it'll give you a sense of how much science and technology go into what
    seems like a simple thing at face value:
    <http://www.foodproductdesign.com/archive/1993/0193CS.html>

    > I use Guar
    > and if I mix it in a dry mix before adding liquids, it does fine but I
    > haven't tried Xanthum. If you are mixing either with liquids, is
    > there a secret to keep it from "clumping"?


    You've discovered the secret. Mix it with other dry ingredients, as you
    do. Those other ingredients are called "diluents." Combining the gum
    with the dry means that the granules of gum are separated, and that
    prevents or at least minimizes the formation of clumps when hydrated by
    slowing down the rate at which water is absorbed.

    Pastorio
     
  15. Nomad

    Nomad Guest

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 09:44:59 -0500, "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >Here's everything about gums all in one place, probably too much. But
    >it'll give you a sense of how much science and technology go into what
    >seems like a simple thing at face value:
    ><http://www.foodproductdesign.com/archive/1993/0193CS.html>
    >
    >
    >Pastorio



    Thanks Bob.
     
  16. FOB

    FOB Guest

    Put it in a salt shaker, sprinkle some on your liquid and stir like crazy
    with something like a whisk.

    In news:[email protected],
    Nomad <[email protected]> stated
    |
    | Is there a noted difference between Guar and Xanthum as to their
    | uses? Does one mix / dissolve better than another, or is one
    | better than the other in certain recipes? I use Guar
    | and if I mix it in a dry mix before adding liquids, it does fine but I
    | haven't tried Xanthum. If you are mixing either with liquids, is
    | there a secret to keep it from "clumping"?
    |
    | Thanks
     
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