Tired of tyres

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Guest, Apr 21, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am currently using Conti GP 3000 but have been getting too many puntures, eventhough I am inflating to corrrect pressures...Before I used Vredenstein Fortezza Tri Comp, but these have proved to be too expensive....
    Any ideas on affordable tires - I am willing to shop online if need be.
    Keep on rollin!
     
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  2. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

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    A tyre should inflate to absolute minimum 100 Kpa. Better tyres go right up to 125 Kpa. I currently ride Vittoria Rubino Kevlar's, which have served me well. They inflate to 115 Kpa.
    Have you heard of Tufo tyre's? A tubular tyre for clincher rims. A bit on the expensive side though, but I'm sure worth the cost. You should be able to pick these up all major bike shops.
    Click here for the specs. Scroll down to the "TUFO TUBULAR TIRES FOR CLINCHER RIMS" section.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    michelin axial pro are great tires. I've gone through 3 sets with only two flats, one front and one rear. I use them everyday. these are the regular axial pro...i have axial pro light for raceday (although great tires, lights are lighter and not quite as durable), but can't comment on the axial pro race. these are treadless tires but grip good! never had one slide out from under me...
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I'm using the PRO Race tyres and they are ace. They are very 'sticky' and are made out of a supple rubber which rolls really well! I've used axial pros and pro lights, but would recommend the change to the pro race tyres.

    They match my frame too!
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    is there much difference between the Axial Pro's and the Pro Roads ? the pro roads are $4 more than the pro's
    i agree that axial pros are excellent for racing but as they only last a short time (front wheel 3000 and back wheel 2000k) i use cheap Vitoria rubina tyres for practice on my mavic open pros.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I've not done too many miles on my PRO's yet so I'm not sure how durable/long lasting they are. I'll let you know!
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    gear grinder...

    I'm not familiar with pro roads so I can't comment on them. 2 - 3000km doesn't seem like much. my axial pros usually serve up about 3000 to 3500 miles (4800 - 5600km), but admittedly, sometimes a little thread is showing on the rear by then; I replace tires in pairs. I then use the old tires, on a separate rear wheel, on my trainer.

    occasionally the items you order on-line or from catalogs is what is known as OEM material. nothing "really" wrong with it, but perhaps not the best quality or adherence to spec. I once ordered a set of tires on-line, and when I received them they were merely thrown in the shipping box and not banded with the normal manufacturer's packaging as they would be at your LBS. at the time I thought that was peculiar, but reasoned the on-line vendor was trying to save shipping weight. those tires sucked. maybe coincidence, maybe not, but they got scuffed, cut, and nicked more than any tire before or since.
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest


    Rv you have me intrigued, Whats OEM ? I know the discussion is about Road tires but only today I recieved a set of Tioga's for my MTB that I ordered online. They look okay to me but what do I know :)
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    nope mine where properly packed and the real deal.
    maybe yours last longer because you have better roads?
    most of my riding is on rougher surfaces. Im sure on baby smooth road they would last longer
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    L-G

    OEM stands for "original equipment manufacturer"

    take a large bike company...it really makes frames but sells complete bikes. the pieces/parts, bought by the frame maker in large quantities from a component company, come into the LBS in a box along with the frame and the junior mechanic puts everything together. some of the parts, manufactured by the compnent companies, may not be as good as what you would buy off the LBS shelf as a replacement part...the rim may be scratched, or there may be a small dimple where it was welded together. the component marginally meets spec, may not cause a problem or perform poorly,but probably not be the one you'd choose if you were knowledgeable and had your pick of many. not saying this is a wide spread practice, but sometimes happens.
     
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