trek 5200 touring - panniers or ?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Frank Riley, Feb 8, 2003.

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  1. Frank Riley

    Frank Riley Guest

    I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to figure
    out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have camping
    gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these for panniers?
    I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through it would have
    to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest gear). I fear
    the connection there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout. Since the
    seatstays don't have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I have any
    other options besides panniers?
     
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  2. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    "Frank Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to
    > figure out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have
    > camping gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these
    for
    > panniers? I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through
    > it would have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest
    > gear). I fear the
    connection
    > there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout. Since the seatstays don't
    > have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I have any other options
    > besides panniers?

    I suggest you look into a cargo trailer. Even if you could mount a rack, heal clearance would likely
    be a problem. Stability is a key concern. Whatever you select, make sure you can handle the bike +
    load going down a steep and winding road. It is a very good idea to test all of this before you
    begin your tour. Make sure your wheels and brakes can handle the extra load as well. Remember rim
    heating on descents can be an issue as well. BOB is a popular brand. However, if you select a 2
    wheel trailer, you can shift even more of the load onto the trailer.

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to
    >figure out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have
    >camping gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these for
    >panniers?

    It's a fender/rack eyelet.

    > I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through it would
    > have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest gear).

    Yes, use the correct length bolt, get them at a hardware store that has a good fastener selection.
    Choose stainless. Although loading a carbon frame may create stress in places that it wasn't
    designed to tolerate, I think 25 pounds on a 5200 is probably safe. I don't know what Trek would say
    about it though. I bet Mike J. knows.

    It is certainly worthwhile to make an effort to reduce the load as much as possible. You do also
    have the option of using a rack that clamps onto the seatpost. Assuming you are not huge, adding 20
    pounds there is probably OK.

    This one says 20 pounds max:

    http://pricepoint.com/product1133.html

    You could make up the difference with a handlebar bag.

    > I fear the connection there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout.

    That area is actually pretty strong and designed to have weight on it. The seat stay bridge however
    might not be engineered to have something pushing on it from that direction or prying on the brake
    pivot bolt.

    > Since the seatstays don't have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I
    > have any other options besides panniers?

    Here's one -

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/carradice/

    It would look great on a 5200, you just need a Brooks Professional to complete the look. :)

    --Paul
     
  4. In article <Fkd1a.31998$A%[email protected]>, Paul Southworth
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >That area is actually pretty strong and designed to have weight on it. The seat stay bridge however
    >might not be engineered to have something pushing on it from that direction or prying on the brake
    >pivot bolt.

    On second thought if you think about the prying on that bolt from just using the brake, I can't
    imagine a rack would ever approach the load generated by braking. There must be pretty substantial
    beef to that joint in a 5200.

    --Paul
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 08 Feb 2003 18:47:26 GMT, Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have camping gear, but no cooking equipment).

    That's certainly not excessive, should be well withing the capabilities of any half-decent bike.

    >I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these for panniers?

    For a rack, yes.

    >I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through it would
    >have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest gear).

    You can pack the bolt head with washers or even a spare nut if it's too long, but make sure they're
    on the outside of the rack leg. Also
    note: dogleg racks are better for supporting panniers and stopping them flapping in the breeze, as
    it were. The Blackburn EX2 is an example of a good quality touring rack with dogleg stays - I
    can recommend it form experience: <http://www.sjscycles.com/store/item1603.htm>

    >I fear the connection there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout.

    Very unlikely. It's what it's there for!

    >Since the seatstays don't have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top?

    You can mount on the brake bridge; not ideal for very heavy loads as the rack tends to be slightly
    less stable, but perfectly adequate for
    20lb. Alternatively you can use P-clips on the seatstays. But I'd use the brake bridge.

    >Do I have any other options besides panniers?

    A trailer - but that would be over the top for that weight, and would be more expensive as well.

    If in doubt send Trek an email asking them if the dropout eyelets are good for 25lb, but I would
    just go for it.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  6. Frank Riley wrote:
    > I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to
    > figure out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have
    > camping gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these for
    > panniers? I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through
    > it would have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest
    > gear). I fear the connection there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout.
    > Since the seatstays don't have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I
    > have any other options besides panniers?

    Yes, if you have holes in yourdropouts, they're generally for racks and fenders - if only one hole
    per side, you can mount both using a longer bolt.

    My inexpensive MEC racks came with multiple sets of bolts, one of which was just long enough to go
    through the rack stay and the dropout, and come flush to the inside (well, perhaps 1/2 thread proud,
    just so you know it's there.) Use Blue Locktite (in the red tube.)

    If you don't have top bolt holes, you can use P-clamps. Again, many racks come with them, gratis. If
    yours doesn't, ask at your LBS's parts counter.

    Other options include seat-tube racks, seat bags, front racks and panniers, and a handlebar bag.
    Perhaps you might search the archives of the Touring List at phred.org for "5200" and "rack."
     
  7. >I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200.

    Loaded? That's ambitious. If you're a lightweight you might do it, but I'd recommend looking at that
    rear wheel in a serious frame of mind. You could put a Tubus Fly rack on the bike, that would give
    you the carrying capacity, but you might expect some problems from that light equipment.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  8. Frank Riley

    Frank Riley Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    >>I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200.
    >
    > Loaded? That's ambitious. If you're a lightweight you might do it, but I'd recommend looking at
    > that rear wheel in a serious frame of mind. You could put a Tubus Fly rack on the bike, that would
    > give you the carrying capacity, but you might expect some problems from that light equipment.
    >

    Well, I've modified the bike for training and the trip. I've replaced my wheels with the 32 (round)
    spoke wheels off my old road bike. The crank is already a triple and I put an XT derailleur and
    11-32 cassette on. The only thing I'm real worried about is I'll probably only be able to use 25
    tires. I don't think 28's will fit inside the stays. Anything else I should be concerned about with
    the wheels (I'm not being sarcastic, I really want to know)?
     
  9. > Well, I've modified the bike for training and the trip. I've replaced my wheels with the 32
    > (round) spoke wheels off my old road bike. The crank is already a triple and I put an XT
    > derailleur and 11-32 cassette on. The
    only
    > thing I'm real worried about is I'll probably only be able to use 25
    tires.
    > I don't think 28's will fit inside the stays. Anything else I should be concerned about with the
    > wheels (I'm not being sarcastic, I really want to know)?

    Depending upon how much you weigh yourself, I'm not sure you really have to worry about the stock
    wheels. Particularly if you have the Vector Comps, which, due to their tall cross-section, are more
    resistant than most to damage from hitting something. And, whether you've got a Vector Comp or the
    newer Bontrager RaceLite, the spokes are relatively conventional, and can be replaced with everyday
    garden-variety spokes available at finer bike shops everywhere. In the event you have something
    truly catastrophic happen to a wheel, does it really matter if you can quickly get a rim vs replace
    the entire wheel? Most likely not, as it costs nearly as much to rebuilt a wheel with a new rim and
    spokes as it does to purchase an entire new wheel.

    The rear rack should have no problems being bolted to the threaded holes in the dropout; good thing
    you don't have a current 5200, since it no longer has the holes. I'd mount the upper part of the
    rack to the brake bridge; we've done this many times. Make sure to remove the washer that's there,
    or else you might not be engaging enough threads on the brake nut.

    In general, I'd try to keep the weight in the panniers as light as possible. The 5200 isn't a
    touring bike, and the shorter wheelbase is going to put quite a bit of weight right over the rear
    wheel. Credit-card touring is fine (no tent or sleeping bag). Done that myself; lots of fun!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com "Frank Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > >>I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200.
    > >
    > > Loaded? That's ambitious. If you're a lightweight you might do it, but I'd recommend looking at
    > > that rear wheel in a serious frame of mind. You could put a Tubus Fly rack on the bike, that
    > > would give you the carrying capacity, but you might expect some problems from that light
    > > equipment.
    > >
    >
    > Well, I've modified the bike for training and the trip. I've replaced my wheels with the 32
    > (round) spoke wheels off my old road bike. The crank is already a triple and I put an XT
    > derailleur and 11-32 cassette on. The
    only
    > thing I'm real worried about is I'll probably only be able to use 25
    tires.
    > I don't think 28's will fit inside the stays. Anything else I should be concerned about with the
    > wheels (I'm not being sarcastic, I really want to know)?
     
  10. David Storm

    David Storm Guest

    You might want to consider a BOB. My experience on my first loaded tour using a BOB with a
    Cannondale R1000 is described at: http://home.att.net/~dlstorm/SactoCoast.htm . I also recently met
    a guy on the road who was just finishing up a cross-country from NY to San Francisco pulling a BOB
    with a lightweight Cannondale R2000. It can be done, but keep in mind stability issues with a light,
    short wheelbase bike.

    "Frank Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to
    > figure out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have
    > camping gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these
    for
    > panniers? I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through
    > it would have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest
    > gear). I fear the
    connection
    > there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout. Since the seatstays don't
    > have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I have any other options
    > besides panniers?
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>>I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200.
    >>
    >> Loaded? That's ambitious. If you're a lightweight you might do it, but I'd recommend looking at
    >> that rear wheel in a serious frame of mind. You could put a Tubus Fly rack on the bike, that
    >> would give you the carrying capacity, but you might expect some problems from that light
    >> equipment.
    >>
    >
    >Well, I've modified the bike for training and the trip. I've replaced my wheels with the 32 (round)
    >spoke wheels off my old road bike. The crank is already a triple and I put an XT derailleur and
    >11-32 cassette on. The only thing I'm real worried about is I'll probably only be able to use 25
    >tires. I don't think 28's will fit inside the stays. Anything else I should be concerned about with
    >the wheels (I'm not being sarcastic, I really want to know)?

    With 25 pounds on the bike you should be fine with 700x25's. More would be better but I wouldn't
    worry about it.
     
  12. Frank Miles

    Frank Miles Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>>I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200.
    >>
    >> Loaded? That's ambitious. If you're a lightweight you might do it, but I'd recommend looking at
    >> that rear wheel in a serious frame of mind. You could put a Tubus Fly rack on the bike, that
    >> would give you the carrying capacity, but you might expect some problems from that light
    >> equipment.
    >>
    >
    >Well, I've modified the bike for training and the trip. I've replaced my wheels with the 32 (round)
    >spoke wheels off my old road bike. The crank is already a triple and I put an XT derailleur and
    >11-32 cassette on. The only thing I'm real worried about is I'll probably only be able to use 25
    >tires. I don't think 28's will fit inside the stays. Anything else I should be concerned about with
    >the wheels (I'm not being sarcastic, I really want to know)?

    I'd be most concerned about the wheels as well. 25 lbs is fairly light for a "full load", so you
    might get away with it. On most roads it should be sufficient -- the problem is that over such a
    distance you may run into some unexpected stony/unpaved roads. That can be bad with a full load and
    dinky tires -- snakebite leaks. Be sure to keep tire pressures up!

    Your training should also be tops for this kind of distance. If there are many hills involved, it
    may be something of a challenge even to eat enough food to keep up your energy, at least if you're
    not accustomed to putting out that much energy consistently, day after day. You're young, right?
    That would help...

    -frank
    --
     
  13. Terry Rudd

    Terry Rudd Guest

    While I think Paul is right with all his advice, I have to ask the question: are you really sure you
    want to go touring with a 5200? This is a race/performance oriented bike and not really set up with
    a touring geometry. As Paul noted, with the short chainstays, your likely to have clearance problems
    with even small panniers and your feet.

    If you feel this is just the right bike for you anyway, perhaps you should get a trailer, like a
    BobYak trailer and load it lightly. The frame is stiff and strong in the rear and should be able to
    manage a light load. Add in a good handle bar bag and you are set. I bet you can rent the trailer
    for such a trip (not a bad idea until you are sure you want to do this more than once).

    Regardless of what you do with your touring set up, test it. Given the 5200 road racing geometry,
    you might induce some very funky bike handling with a trailer or panniers, especially on steep
    decents. Be sure you trust the rig before you start out on your vacation.

    Good luck!

    Terry

    Paul Southworth wrote:
    > In article <Fkd1a.31998$A%[email protected]>, Paul Southworth
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>That area is actually pretty strong and designed to have weight on it. The seat stay bridge
    >>however might not be engineered to have something pushing on it from that direction or prying on
    >>the brake pivot bolt.
    >
    >
    > On second thought if you think about the prying on that bolt from just using the brake, I can't
    > imagine a rack would ever approach the load generated by braking. There must be pretty substantial
    > beef to that joint in a 5200.
    >
    > --Paul
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 9 Feb 2003 05:08:36 GMT, [email protected] (Frank Miles) wrote:

    >I'd be most concerned about the wheels as well. 25 lbs is fairly light for a "full load", so you
    >might get away with it. [...] Be sure to keep tire pressures up!

    With you on that one. If the wheels are stock, it may be worth haviong them retensioned by hand
    beforehand. I've never broken a spoke on a handbuilt wheel.

    25lb is not a lot of weight - I've carried 20lb in my trunk bag alone.

    Of course this is the perfect opportunity to justify grabbing that TourEasy, but Your Wife
    May Vary :-D

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through it would
    > have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest gear).

    If you wind up with a bolt that's a little too long, it can be spaced with an extra washer or two.
    It's a kludgy solution, but it works in a pinch.

    In re racks: personally, I deplore aluminum ones -- I've never had good luck with them. The tang
    that goes to the seatstays has always been the weak link for me. So, I second the suggestion about
    the Rivendell Nitto. Where racks are concerned, I ascribe to the "steel is real" school of thought.

    cheers, Tom
     
  16. Pixelbrainz

    Pixelbrainz Guest

    Frank Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I plan to do a 3 week 1600 mile tour this summer on my Trek 5200. My problem is I'm trying to
    > figure out how to put some storage on my bike. I hope to only be carrying about 25lbs (I will have
    > camping gear, but no cooking equipment). I have 2 threaded holes in my dropouts... are these
    for
    > panniers? I'm concerned about using the hole on the cassette side because the bolt going through
    > it would have to be flush on the inside (otherwise it would hit the chain when I'm in the largest
    > gear). I fear the
    connection
    > there won't be strong enough or I could cause damage to the dropout. Since the seatstays don't
    > have mounts at the top, how would I mount the panniers at the top? Do I have any other options
    > besides panniers?

    Hi Frank

    On a short bike you will have a problem with weight distribution. The back bags will need to be
    pushed way back to clear your feet making it worse. A handlebar bag will help distribute some of
    this weight up front plus it is nice to be able to eat out of a handlebar bag, read maps, keep
    your camera etc. 25 lbs is pretty light gear, you'll be hauling ass. This probably is not enough
    weight to really mess up the weight distribution but you do need to balance the bike or it won't
    handle well.

    Just make sure with your load on that the bike doesn't start shaking on a fast hill. This gets very
    tiring trying to control plus it can wipe you out if the occilation gets bad enough. You should be
    able to ride no hands.

    25 lbs huh, what no books? ;-)

    Have a great trip PB
     
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