Using a gym stationary bike as trainer

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by SniperX, Feb 3, 2003.

  1. SniperX

    SniperX New Member

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    I was just wondering if using the gym stationary bike will produce the same gains as compared to the " attached to the bike" trainer ?
     
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  2. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Depending on the intensity at which you ride the answer will be no. At low levels (probably bottom of endurance training scale) it probably won't matter. as the intensity increases part of the adaptation that occurs at a cellular level, are specific to the joint angle and velocity at which they are trained. Most gym bikes i have seen don't adequately match real bikes, and thus joint angles and velocities will be different.

    Ric
     
  3. SniperX

    SniperX New Member

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    But it still can be used for increasing one's aerobic caparcity , fitness levels etc rite?
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    It really depends on what you mean by fitness and aerobic capacity and what sort of level you are. For instance, you'd get fitter training for a marathon by running, but this wouldn't necessarily have much impact on your cycling fitness (i.e., your run fitness my increase X%, whereas your cycling fitness might only increase 0.333X%). This is because some of the adaptations that occur through training are at a cellular level, which adapt at the specific joint angle and velocities at which they are trained.

    I usually assume aerobic capacity to mean VO2 max (the maximal volume of oxygen uptake) -- with that type of intensity it would only be of any use to train at the specific position in which you race. This is one reason (e.g.) why i have the Time triallers i coach, use their race specific bike and position at least once a week all year round.

    Accordingly, you *will* get fitter in any mode of exercise if the stimulus is great enough, but the adaptations will be better (i.e., you'll have better bike fitness) if you create that stimulus on *your* bike. This will be less important if you don't actually race.

    As an aside, because of this, i ride my race bike all year round!

    Ric
     
  5. SniperX

    SniperX New Member

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    hmmz coaching of time triallers ... u sound pretty experience to me man any advice to give as a starting off to be competitive racer? =)
     
  6. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    My advice is too see a doctor -- see the HR thread.

    Ric
     
  7. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Ric,

    Although I agree with you on all of your points, I do feel that a gym bike has uses. Particularly for the untrained rider, as they are likly to make significant adaptations whether they are on a gym or at home on a turbo. Also a gym bike gives the rider an opportunity to get off a turbo and away from other cyclists and still improve performance.

    Even so at all times we need to remember the limitations of performing any training on any type of bike or surface.

    As you state many of the adaptations occur at specific joint angles and velocities, however this is also true of the type of resistance. What is your opininon (can't find any research on this) on which is the best form of resistance (e.g. magnetic, electronicly braked, wind, fluid, etc.)?
     
  8. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    2Lap,

    welcome back it's been a while since we've seen you here!

    I agree wholeheartedly with you, about the untrained rider. However, i got the feeling that the person asking the question was at least fairly well trained! plus the question, to my mind at least, was highly specific.

    I'm not sure about the last part of your query. there's plenty of papers validating e.g., Kingcycle, but i don't think any (that i can think of suggesting differences in resistances).

    Presumably, different methods of resistance, might alter the initial inertial affect as a subject accelerates -- but the inertia might be more linked with the mass of the flywheel. Once up to a constant load, i don't think it'll make a difference in a physiological perspective. for instance, 250 W, is 250 W and metabolic responses are constrained by the mechanical power output required, and then secondary factors such as cadence, which alters effieciency. That's not to say that some types of trainers/resistance units feel 'pants' (scientific word that!), and others don't!

    Ric
     
  9. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    The query comes from some reading I did a year ago when coaching some gymnastics. When strength training, the form of resistance used is also an important consideration in specificity. For gymnastics, weight training that is based on gravity rather than elastic (often used with children) are better because they reporoduce the forces experianced by the gymnast. Similar thing for rowers where the rowers are 'let down' by 'air' based trainers because they dont provide the same forces as water.

    This lead me to think about turbo trainers, which one replicates the forces experianced on the road or trail? The type of resistance would affect transfer of training to the road. As you say, this would be maximal in sessions where there is acceleration and I believe have a small effect during pedaling (the wheel slows and accelerates in every pedal revolution). Also, I believe this affect would have a minimal impact on physiological factors, but more on psychological factors (like nural dribve, etc.).

    Hope the above makes sense and sheds some light. Good to be back thanks Ric.
     
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