What are...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by D.M. Procida, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. I've just
    got this thing in the garage that I ride to work. Having been reading
    this newsgroup over the last couple of days I realise that everything
    has changed...

    So, what are:

    biopace chainsets
    u-brakes
    disk wheels

    There are more, but those will do to start with.

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
    Tags:


  2. A.Lee

    A.Lee Guest

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 19:36:09 +0100, D.M. Procida wrote:

    > It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. So, what are:
    > biopace chainsets


    These are the front chainrings(chainset) connected to the pedals,
    which are usually round, but Biopace rings are oval/egg shaped.This was
    supposedly to make the pedal stroke more efficient, but the benefits never
    caught on, and the downsides did catch on, so they were dropped fairly
    quickly, though there are still people around who swear by them.

    > u-brakes


    U-brakes are typically used on BMX bikes,similar to cantilever brakes of
    years ago, but the arms are longer,go up, and cross each other, and are
    then pulled up by the cable.Pic here:
    http://www.extremesports.ltd.uk/bmx/bmx-brakes.htm

    V-brakes? This is what is commonly used on all
    but the cheapest mountain bikes now(of course, except the ones with disc
    brakes).There are two arms about 3 inches long conected to the brake pads,
    these rise vertically, and are pulled together by the cable.Pics here:
    http://www.cyclesmart.co.uk/shop/index.php/product/shimano-cm/vbrakes-cm/

    > disk wheels


    Used mainly by time-triallers,and track racers, these are solid wheels,
    hence they look like a disc.Usually used on the back only on the
    road, and sometimes on both wheels on the track.Early ones were glass
    fibre panels over the top of a normal wheel, modern ones are carbon fibre,
    weigh nothing and cost £500+ each.

    >There are more, but those will do to start with.


    For all cycle related information, Sheldon Brown is the man:
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/

    Alan.

    --
    To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
    http://www.dvatc.co.uk - Off-road cycling in the North Midlands.
     
  3. [email protected] (D.M. Procida)typed

    > So, what are:


    > biopace chainsets

    Non-circular (elliptical) front chainwheels.
    These were popular in the late 1980s and '90s but have mostly been
    phased out/superceded.


    > u-brakes


    fairly rigid cantilever-type rim brakes. Feature on many contemprary
    machines and are *very* efficient if well-maintained. You might want
    these but be *very careful* when you first use them!

    > disk wheels

    Spokeless creations used by racers; you probably don't want these!

    > There are more, but those will do to start with.


    > Daniele


    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  4. On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 19:36:09 +0100,
    [email protected] (D.M. Procida) wrote:

    >It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. I've just
    >got this thing in the garage that I ride to work. Having been reading
    >this newsgroup over the last couple of days I realise that everything
    >has changed...
    >
    >So, what are:
    >
    >biopace chainsets


    a blast from the past. If we're talking about the same thing, that is;
    I remember biopace being oval chainrings that were supposed to even
    out the force of pedalling. I'd assumed they'd stopped making the
    things when everyone realised they were crap.

    >u-brakes


    no idea. if you're reading from a handwritten post, it could be
    "v-brakes" written badly.

    >disk wheels


    equally, no idea. But then I just ride a bike. Some of the blokes and
    blokesses here seem to be half man, half bike.

    >There are more, but those will do to start with.
    >
    >Daniele
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message
    <1ghv4o8.1mpeksejs0b16N%real-not-anti-spam[email protected]>,
    D.M. Procida ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. I've
    > just got this thing in the garage that I ride to work. Having been
    > reading this newsgroup over the last couple of days I realise that
    > everything has changed...
    >
    > So, what are:
    >
    > biopace chainsets


    'Biopace' are non-round chainrings produced by Shimano, intended to even
    the torque through the pedalling stroke. With a circular chainring
    there tends to be a bit around the point where the cranks are vertical
    that you can't produce much torque - with is why full suspension bikes
    suffer from bob. Never very popular and now no longer produced, but
    Sheldon Brown liked 'em and so did I.

    > u-brakes


    A now obsolete form of cantilever brakes where the brake arms crossed
    above the tyre instead of sticking out the sides. Replaced by V brakes,
    which are essentially cantilever brakes where the brake arms are
    perpendicular to the action of the brake shoe.

    > disk wheels


    Can mean two things. Probably where you see 'disk wheels' these days it
    will mean wheels equipped with or built for disk brakes. However the
    older usage of 'disk wheels' is wheels with aerodynamic shrouds (like
    coolie hats) covering the spokes. The wheels visually appear to be
    disks, although typically the shrouds are not load-bearing.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; making jokes about dyslexia isn't big, it isn't clever and
    ;; it isn't furry.
     
  6. On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 20:04:30 +0100, in
    <[email protected]>, "A.Lee"
    <[email protected]+.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 19:36:09 +0100, D.M. Procida wrote:
    >
    >> It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. So, what are:
    >> biopace chainsets

    >
    >These are the front chainrings(chainset) connected to the pedals,
    >which are usually round, but Biopace rings are oval/egg shaped.This was
    >supposedly to make the pedal stroke more efficient, but the benefits never
    >caught on, and the downsides did catch on, so they were dropped fairly
    >quickly, though there are still people around who swear by them.


    There was something similar which I've read about too: Chainrings
    which were also elliptical but with the major and minor axes at right
    angles to those of biopace.

    I think it was in Richard Ballantines book.

    --
    Boredband: High speed internet access with uninteresting content.
     
  7. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Richard Bates [email protected] opined the following...
    > There was something similar which I've read about too: Chainrings
    > which were also elliptical but with the major and minor axes at right
    > angles to those of biopace.
    >
    > I think it was in Richard Ballantines book.


    Highpath engineering sell ECG (EGG?) rings which are set so that the
    axis can be adjusted by rotating them around the bolts. (Brain fart! I
    can't seem to remember any terminology today!)

    Jon
     
  8. A.Lee

    A.Lee Guest

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 21:55:55 +0100, Richard Bates wrote:

    > On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 20:04:30 +0100, in
    > <[email protected]>, "A.Lee"
    > <[email protected]+.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 19:36:09 +0100, D.M. Procida wrote:
    >>
    >>> It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. So, what are:
    >>> biopace chainsets

    >>
    >>These are the front chainrings(chainset) connected to the pedals,
    >>which are usually round, but Biopace rings are oval/egg shaped.This was
    >>supposedly to make the pedal stroke more efficient, but the benefits never
    >>caught on, and the downsides did catch on, so they were dropped fairly
    >>quickly, though there are still people around who swear by them.

    >
    > There was something similar which I've read about too: Chainrings
    > which were also elliptical but with the major and minor axes at right
    > angles to those of biopace.
    >
    > I think it was in Richard Ballantines book.


    Yes, there is a bloke still making them,in Wales IIRC who says that
    Shimano got it wrong by putting the longer ends 90 degrees out.
    Alan.

    --
    To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.
    http://www.dvatc.co.uk - Off-road cycling in the North Midlands.
     
  9. A.Lee wrote:

    > Yes, there is a bloke still making them,in Wales IIRC who says that
    > Shimano got it wrong by putting the longer ends 90 degrees out.


    I tend to agree with him. Shimano's rings make you do more work (higher
    gear, longer time) at TDC/BDC. I've not tried them, but that seems the
    wrong way around.

    --
    Mark.
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Mark Tranchant
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > A.Lee wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, there is a bloke still making them,in Wales IIRC who says that
    >> Shimano got it wrong by putting the longer ends 90 degrees out.

    >
    > I tend to agree with him. Shimano's rings make you do more work
    > (higher gear, longer time) at TDC/BDC. I've not tried them, but that
    > seems the wrong way around.


    I've tried them, I used them for years, they work (well). But probably
    not as well as really spinning.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Wise man with foot in mouth use opportunity to clean toes.
    ;; the Worlock
     
  11. >So, what are:
    >
    >biopace chainsets


    I have one of these on my fifteen year-old hybrid. Slightly oval chainrings.
    Apparently to even out pedalling action. Can't say I notice any benefit or
    disadvantage as compared to "normal" chainrings. To me, seems like a bit of a
    gimmick.

    >u-brakes


    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_u-v.html#ubrake

    >disk wheels


    Often used in time trials. See
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_d.html#discwheel

    My son has one for use on the rear of his time trial bike, and a trispoke wheel
    for use on the front. See
    http://www.hedwheels.com/disc.html
    http://www.hedwheels.com/h3_front.html

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers, helen s


    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

    --Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
     
  12. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:

    >>biopace chainsets


    > I have one of these on my fifteen year-old hybrid. Slightly oval chainrings.
    > Apparently to even out pedalling action. Can't say I notice any benefit or
    > disadvantage as compared to "normal" chainrings. To me, seems like a bit of a
    > gimmick.


    They arrived late 80s, and were the Big New Thing. They've since more
    or less disappeared without much trace, so the market in general, from
    professionals down, seemed to agree with the above assessment.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  13. Russ

    Russ Guest

    "D.M. Procida" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    news:1ghv4o8.1mpeksejs0b16N%[email protected]
    > It's years since I was a teenager and knew stuff about bikes. I've just
    > got this thing in the garage that I ride to work. Having been reading
    > this newsgroup over the last couple of days I realise that everything
    > has changed...
    >
    > So, what are:
    >
    > biopace chainsets

    Outdated and discredited technology that's really only worth knowing about
    so you can avoid

    > u-brakes

    Outdated and discredited technology that's really only worth knowing about
    so you can avoid

    > disk wheels

    Outdated and discredited technology that's really only worth knowing about
    so you can avoid(unless you're into time trialling where they're state of
    the art)

    HTH :)
    Russ
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    ..
    'having seen the other actually helpful replies'
     
Loading...