Why is the first mile hard?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by yk, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. yk

    yk Guest

    A beginner question.
    I run 3-4miles a day.
    I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    What is the reason ?
     
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  2. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    "yk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >A beginner question.
    > I run 3-4miles a day.
    > I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    > What is the reason ?


    It takes a while for the body to "warm-up".

    For that reason it's a good idea to start off at a
    very gentle pace, and gradually run faster.

    Good luck.

    Anthony.
     
  3. TBR

    TBR Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 21:20:30 -0800, "yk" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >A beginner question.
    >I run 3-4miles a day.
    >I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    >What is the reason ?


    You are a pussy.

    / ~ .\
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  4. eNo

    eNo Guest

    "yk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > A beginner question.
    > I run 3-4miles a day.
    > I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    > What is the reason ?



    Perfectly normal. In fact, I ran 2 races in consecutive weekends just this
    past week, the first a full, the 2nd a 1/2 marathon. In the full, it took me
    9 miles to start feeling okay. In the 1/2, 3 miles. This is why I don't run
    5k's ;).

    --
    `°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°
    ,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,
    eNo
    "Test everything; hold on to the good."
     
  5. On 2006-01-17, eNo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Perfectly normal. In fact, I ran 2 races in consecutive weekends just this
    > past week, the first a full, the 2nd a 1/2 marathon. In the full, it took me
    > 9 miles to start feeling okay. In the 1/2, 3 miles. This is why I don't run
    > 5k's ;).


    It's also why some of us who run 5k or shorter like to do some sort of warm up.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  6. On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 21:20:30 -0800, "yk" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >A beginner question.
    >I run 3-4miles a day.


    >I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.


    me too
    >What is the reason ?
    >


    because your circulatory system, respiratory system, and muscular
    systems have to get into equilibrium. In other words, you have to
    warm up. I don't know of any shortcut.
     
  7. Mike C

    Mike C Guest

    If you're a true beginner, you might start off that first mile with a
    bit of walking...let the body get into it that way, and when you feel
    ready (or after perhaps 2-3 minutes of walking), start running. Might
    not feel quite so hard that way. Just a thought.

    Mike C

    yk wrote:
    > A beginner question.
    > I run 3-4miles a day.
    > I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    > What is the reason ?
     
  8. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Mike C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If you're a true beginner, you might start off that first mile with a
    > bit of walking...let the body get into it that way, and when you feel
    > ready (or after perhaps 2-3 minutes of walking), start running. Might
    > not feel quite so hard that way. Just a thought.



    This isn't rocket science. Start off nice and slow, be this a walk or
    very slow jog. After you feel warmed up slowly pick up the pace but stay
    comfortable. Comfortable is warmed up muscles and the ability to talk to
    someone if they were running with you.

    -DF
     
  9. Citizen Ted

    Citizen Ted Guest

    On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 13:21:07 GMT, "Doug Freese" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Mike C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> If you're a true beginner, you might start off that first mile with a
    >> bit of walking...let the body get into it that way, and when you feel
    >> ready (or after perhaps 2-3 minutes of walking), start running. Might
    >> not feel quite so hard that way. Just a thought.

    >
    >
    >This isn't rocket science. Start off nice and slow, be this a walk or
    >very slow jog. After you feel warmed up slowly pick up the pace but stay
    >comfortable. Comfortable is warmed up muscles and the ability to talk to
    >someone if they were running with you.


    I have a trick to ensure I warm up properly:

    As I start my run, I shut my mouth and breathe only through my nose.
    If I absent-mindedly start picking up the pace, the urge to start
    sucking in air through my mouth will become irresistable - so I will
    slow down instead.

    How long to "warm up"? Varies for me. On a hot summer day, I'm ready
    to speed up after half a mile or so. In the dead of winter, I'll be
    nose-breathing for 8-13 minutes.

    Although I time and log each run, I allow myself a long warm-up if I
    think I need it. My time will suck, but that just means my next run on
    this loop has plenty of room for improvement. ;0)

    - TR
    ObReview: I used to post here a few years back. My running had
    progressed well, with 20min 5K's. But I enjoyed drinking too much.
    Changed jobs. Got lazy. Put on weight. Didn't care. Now I'm back. I
    have 20 pounds to lose. It's peeling off easy and my "running legs"
    are returning well. I'm going easy - just 15 or so miles per week at
    an easy 8-9min pace. My goal is to simply run injury-free, not to win
    races or impress this motley NG. I'll post my race stories as they
    come up, and I'll keep them entertaining.
     
  10. every mile is easy for me on most days.
     
  11. Oh c'mon, are you really that dense? Just start on mile two.
     
  12. Kaz Kylheku

    Kaz Kylheku Guest

    yk wrote:
    > A beginner question.
    > I run 3-4miles a day.
    > I always feel the first 1 mile the hardest.
    > What is the reason ?


    Because you go out too fast, and then after that hard mile, you stop
    putting in the effort.

    If you properly distribute your effort over the intented distance, it
    will start easy and become gradually harder.
     
  13. Kaz Kylheku

    Kaz Kylheku Guest

    Doug Freese wrote:
    > "Mike C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > If you're a true beginner, you might start off that first mile with a
    > > bit of walking...let the body get into it that way, and when you feel
    > > ready (or after perhaps 2-3 minutes of walking), start running. Might
    > > not feel quite so hard that way. Just a thought.

    >
    >
    > This isn't rocket science. Start off nice and slow, be this a walk or
    > very slow jog. After you feel warmed up slowly pick up the pace but stay
    > comfortable. Comfortable is warmed up muscles and the ability to talk to
    > someone if they were running with you.


    I don't know what you guys are talking about. The start of a run is
    always super-easy for me, and I can go way too fast without being aware
    of it. I'm always dying near the end of a run. No matter what the
    distance is, I can divide my effort so that in the last half mile, the
    urge to walk is almost overwhelming, be it 4 miles, 8 miles, 12 or 22.

    In the first mile, I can easily clock 30-45 seconds per mile faster
    than the intended pace, without being aware of it. I feel light, fast
    and springy.

    My trick is to avoid going too fast is to limit the oxygen coming in. I
    will breathe in, count 15 more steps, then breathe out, count 15 more
    steps and so on. The actual count varies on the intended pace and
    distance.

    But I'm still a youngster, only 35. I'm slicking along with 5W-20 oil,
    whereas you old farts have SAE-80 syrup gummed up in the bottoms of
    your oil pans that needs 8 miles of warm-up before it reaches those
    titanium knee and hip joints.

    One thing I find difficult at the beginning that gets easier is the
    handling of bad weather. Like heavy January rain coming down. That
    requires a kind of equilibrium to establish itself. Mainly, I think,
    it's psychological. You stabilize at a certain level of discomfort, and
    then when you can take five minutes of it, you can progress to ten.
    Then ten becomes twenty, twenty becomes one hour and one hour soon
    becomes three.
     
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