Why my posting cannot stand by itself?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Fuli Chang, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Fuli Chang

    Fuli Chang Guest

    Opinions solicited

    I lost part of speech on the morning of Nov. 10, 2003, and didn't go to hospital until the evening
    of Nov. 11. At that time I had only speech difficulty, but nothing else. I drove 25 miles on the
    highway, sometimes at the speed of 70 mph, from my residence to the hospital.

    At the hospital I was diagnosed as having a stroke, and given some pills. A while after taking those
    pills, my body started sweating profusely, and I became extremely weak and drowsy. In the meantime,
    both the left and right sides of my body were numbing. I complained to the nurse about it, but
    nothing was done about it.

    Then the left side became better. The numbness was decreased and eventually gone. But the numbness
    on right did not go away.

    After leaving the hospital, I found the administered medication was 'clonidine' from my medical
    records, and got some information about it from following web sites:

    http://www.edutechsbs.com/adhd/00019.htm http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/clonidin_ids.htm
    http://www.whatmeds.com/meds/clonidine.html http://www.healthsquare.com/newrx/CAT1072.HTM

    All the sources say the starting dose for clonidine is 0.1 mg, and must be adjusted for each
    individual's response to it. But the medicine was administered to me 0.2 mg only one time, and
    changed to Norvacs after that.

    I have been out of the hospital for more than three months. My speech has improved a lot. But the
    numbness is not alleviated at all. The muscles on my right always ache. I feel a rope tightened
    behind my right knee. My right should and side always feel tight and stiff. It is difficult for me
    to walk, drive and lift things. My right side does not cooperate with my left side. I am not able to
    do my regular job, and must retire.

    I talked to a doctor from China by phone. She said that if blood pressure is dropped too fast after
    a stroke, it will make the stroke worse. She told me that I was feeling numbing because the flow of
    my blood became too slow. Unfortunately the doctor is not allowed to work in the U.S.

    Now I need opinions from American doctors. For above description, was my stroke made worse by the
    clonidine? Or was my body numbness and stiffness caused by it? Why did I became so sick after taking
    the medicine?

    Thanks.

    Fuli Chang
     
    Tags:


  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Julianne gave an excellent response to your previous identical post. If for some reason you missed
    it I copied and pasted it below.

    Bill

    ____________________________________

    The Chinese doctor might very well be correct and I understand that it is frustrating when you feel
    you don't have information.

    First of all, you said you complained to the nurse but nothing was done about it. Do you know that
    for certain? Why the change from Clonidine to Norvasc if she ignored your reports of increased
    numbness and physical symptoms. Did she continue to monitor your blood pressure? Are you certain
    that she didn't reach behind you and increase the rate of your IV fluids? Most times, it is very
    inappropriate for a nurse to stand at a patient's bed with a horrified look on her face and
    proclaim, "Oh my word, you are getting so much worse!" Patients are sensitive creatures.

    Stroke patients often present with alarmingly high blood pressures. It would be really nice if there
    was a drug that worked so precisely that it could be given with an exact result. I would invest
    heavily in a company who could promise that for every mg of a drug, blood pressure would drop by
    five points. Then, if I wanted to slowly drop blood pressure, I would give it one mg at a time.
    Alas, it does not work that way. Some people respond very dramatically to medications and others
    make you wonder if they have a built in immunity to them.

    Without looking at your entire chart, I cannot know what your blood pressure was. I do know that
    when it is very high as it often is when presenting with a stroke, you are at risk for multiple
    events. It is a challenge to work with imprecise medications and patients whose response varies to
    establish a happy balance between having a pressure so high that it causes another stroke vs
    dropping it too rapidly. Besides the imprecise nature of meds, blood pressure is influenced by many
    other factors. The elasticity of your arteries changes with age, diet, genetics, race, fluid
    status, electrolytes and the number of alpha and beta receptors you have tacked on your smooth
    arterial walls.

    The reason why clonidine is often started off at a lower dosage is because it can cause a condition
    called orthostatic hypotension. In ambulatory patients, this means that when they stand up, they
    have a sudden but brief drop in blood pressure which causes falls and broken hips, etc. Not a good
    thing. So, the med is started at a low dose and gradually ramped up. Since you were likely in the
    bed, this wouldn't have concerned the docs.

    Although it is alarming that you continue to have symptoms, it sounds as if you are doing well. You
    state that you are driving but are having some residual coordination problems and numbness. I have
    seen physical therapists do terrific work with stroke patients who had much worse residual damage.
    Since you are still able to drive, you should focus on therapy that both assists you in
    rehabilitation as well teaches you an ongoing home/gym exercise plan. By becoming fully involved in
    your continued recovery, you might very well reduce the risks of a future event. As a neurologist
    friend of mine says, "A CVA is no accident!"

    Finally, it disturbs me that you are not able to talk to your physician or other health care
    provider about this. For future health care, you might be well advised to find someone you can talk
    to comfortably.

    j

    ___________________________________________________

    "Fuli Chang" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Opinions solicited
    >
    > I lost part of speech on the morning of Nov. 10, 2003, and didn't go to hospital until the evening
    > of Nov. 11. At that time I had only speech difficulty, but nothing else. I drove 25 miles on the
    > highway, sometimes at the speed of 70 mph, from my residence to the hospital.
    >
    > At the hospital I was diagnosed as having a stroke, and given some pills. A while after taking
    > those pills, my body started sweating profusely, and I became extremely weak and drowsy. In the
    > meantime, both the left and right sides of my body were numbing. I complained to the nurse about
    > it, but nothing was done about it.
    >
    > Then the left side became better. The numbness was decreased and eventually gone. But the numbness
    > on right did not go away.
    >
    > After leaving the hospital, I found the administered medication was 'clonidine' from my medical
    > records, and got some information about it from following web sites:
    >
    > http://www.edutechsbs.com/adhd/00019.htm http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/clonidin_ids.htm
    > http://www.whatmeds.com/meds/clonidine.html http://www.healthsquare.com/newrx/CAT1072.HTM
    >
    > All the sources say the starting dose for clonidine is 0.1 mg, and must be adjusted for each
    > individual's response to it. But the medicine was administered to me 0.2 mg only one time, and
    > changed to Norvacs after that.
    >
    > I have been out of the hospital for more than three months. My speech has improved a lot. But the
    > numbness is not alleviated at all. The muscles on my right always ache. I feel a rope tightened
    > behind my right knee. My right should and side always feel tight and stiff. It is difficult for me
    > to walk, drive and lift things. My right side does not cooperate with my left side. I am not able
    > to do my regular job, and must retire.
    >
    > I talked to a doctor from China by phone. She said that if blood pressure is dropped too fast
    > after a stroke, it will make the stroke worse. She told me that I was feeling numbing because the
    > flow of my blood became too slow. Unfortunately the doctor is not allowed to work in the U.S.
    >
    > Now I need opinions from American doctors. For above description, was my stroke made worse by the
    > clonidine? Or was my body numbness and stiffness caused by it? Why did I became so sick after
    > taking the medicine?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Fuli Chang
     
  3. Fuli Chang

    Fuli Chang Guest

    Thanks. I am looking for similar cases of Clonidine overdosage. Both patients and physicians are
    welcome. Please contact me.

    > Julianne gave an excellent response to your previous identical post. If for some reason you missed
    > it I copied and pasted it below.
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > ____________________________________
    >
    > The Chinese doctor might very well be correct and I understand that it is frustrating when you
    > feel you don't have information.
    >
    > First of all, you said you complained to the nurse but nothing was done about it. Do you know that
    > for certain? Why the change from Clonidine to Norvasc if she ignored your reports of increased
    > numbness and physical symptoms. Did she continue to monitor your blood pressure? Are you certain
    > that she didn't reach behind you and increase the rate of your IV fluids? Most times, it is very
    > inappropriate for a nurse to stand at a patient's bed with a horrified look on her face and
    > proclaim, "Oh my word, you are getting so much worse!" Patients are sensitive creatures.
    >
    > Stroke patients often present with alarmingly high blood pressures. It would be really nice if
    > there was a drug that worked so precisely that it could be given with an exact result. I would
    > invest heavily in a company who could promise that for every mg of a drug, blood pressure would
    > drop by five points. Then, if I wanted to slowly drop blood pressure, I would give it one mg at a
    > time. Alas, it does not work that way. Some people respond very dramatically to medications and
    > others make you wonder if they have a built in immunity to them.
    >
    > Without looking at your entire chart, I cannot know what your blood pressure was. I do know that
    > when it is very high as it often is when presenting with a stroke, you are at risk for multiple
    > events. It is a challenge to work with imprecise medications and patients whose response varies to
    > establish a happy balance between having a pressure so high that it causes another stroke vs
    > dropping it too rapidly. Besides the imprecise nature of meds, blood pressure is influenced by
    > many other factors. The elasticity of your arteries changes with age, diet, genetics, race, fluid
    > status, electrolytes and the number of alpha and beta receptors you have tacked on your smooth
    > arterial walls.
    >
    > The reason why clonidine is often started off at a lower dosage is because it can cause a
    > condition called orthostatic hypotension. In ambulatory patients, this means that when they stand
    > up, they have a sudden but brief drop in blood pressure which causes falls and broken hips, etc.
    > Not a good thing. So, the med is started at a low dose and gradually ramped up. Since you were
    > likely in the bed, this wouldn't have concerned the docs.
    >
    > Although it is alarming that you continue to have symptoms, it sounds as if you are doing well.
    > You state that you are driving but are having some residual coordination problems and numbness. I
    > have seen physical therapists do terrific work with stroke patients who had much worse residual
    > damage. Since you are still able to drive, you should focus on therapy that both assists you in
    > rehabilitation as well teaches you an ongoing home/gym exercise plan. By becoming fully involved
    > in your continued recovery, you might very well reduce the risks of a future event. As a
    > neurologist friend of mine says, "A CVA is no accident!"
    >
    > Finally, it disturbs me that you are not able to talk to your physician or other health care
    > provider about this. For future health care, you might be well advised to find someone you can
    > talk to comfortably.
    >
    > j
    >
    >
    > ___________________________________________________
    >
    >
    >
    > "Fuli Chang" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Opinions solicited
    > >
    > > I lost part of speech on the morning of Nov. 10, 2003, and didn't go to hospital until the
    > > evening of Nov. 11. At that time I had only speech difficulty, but nothing else. I drove 25
    > > miles on the highway, sometimes at the speed of 70 mph, from my residence to the hospital.
    > >
    > > At the hospital I was diagnosed as having a stroke, and given some pills. A while after taking
    > > those pills, my body started sweating profusely, and I became extremely weak and drowsy. In the
    > > meantime, both the left and right sides of my body were numbing. I complained to the nurse about
    > > it, but nothing was done about it.
    > >
    > > Then the left side became better. The numbness was decreased and eventually gone. But the
    > > numbness on right did not go away.
    > >
    > > After leaving the hospital, I found the administered medication was 'clonidine' from my medical
    > > records, and got some information about it from following web sites:
    > >
    > > http://www.edutechsbs.com/adhd/00019.htm http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/clonidin_ids.htm
    > > http://www.whatmeds.com/meds/clonidine.html http://www.healthsquare.com/newrx/CAT1072.HTM
    > >
    > > All the sources say the starting dose for clonidine is 0.1 mg, and must be adjusted for each
    > > individual's response to it. But the medicine was administered to me 0.2 mg only one time, and
    > > changed to Norvacs after that.
    > >
    > > I have been out of the hospital for more than three months. My speech has improved a lot. But
    > > the numbness is not alleviated at all. The muscles on my right always ache. I feel a rope
    > > tightened behind my right knee. My right should and side always feel tight and stiff. It is
    > > difficult for me to walk, drive and lift things. My right side does not cooperate with my left
    > > side. I am not able to do my regular job, and must retire.
    > >
    > > I talked to a doctor from China by phone. She said that if blood pressure is dropped too
    > > fast after a stroke, it will make the stroke worse. She told me that I was feeling numbing
    > > because the flow of my blood became too slow. Unfortunately the doctor is not allowed to
    > > work in the U.S.
    > >
    > > Now I need opinions from American doctors. For above description, was my stroke made worse by
    > > the clonidine? Or was my body numbness and stiffness caused by it? Why did I became so sick
    > > after taking the medicine?
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > Fuli Chang
     
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