Best runners over 10 miles

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Tony, Sep 30, 2004.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    "'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    fastest animals in the world'. With a person and sled attached, these dogs
    can run 3.2-minute miles for nearly twenty-five miles over a varied terrain
    that includes hills, curves, and woods".

    from "The Cruelest Miles: the heroic story of dogs and men in a race against
    an epidemic" - a good read.

    - Tony
     
    Tags:


  2. Barf Bag

    Barf Bag Guest

    >"'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    >fastest animals in the world'.


    I'm faster.
     
  3. I look forward to The Ikilledadog Race, every year. Oh, and by the
    way.....those dogs don't normally go that fast. It's the maniac with
    the whip and the dog food that make them run at those speeds.
     
  4. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    I don't think there are any runners that tall.

    --Harold Buck


    "I used to rock and roll all night,
    and party every day.
    Then it was every other day. . . ."
    -Homer J. Simpson
     
  5. On 30 Sep 2004 15:50:03 GMT, thebillrodgerz@aol.comUpchuck (Barf Bag)
    wrote:

    >>"'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    >>fastest animals in the world'.

    >
    >I'm faster.


    The poster was referring to purebreds, not mutts.
     
  6. Barf Bag

    Barf Bag Guest

    >The poster was referring to purebreds, not mutts.

    Negative, he said "dogs" and while technically I'm a "dawg" were still related.
     
  7. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Ignoramus29063" <ignoramus29063@NOSPAM.29063.invalid> wrote in message
    news:cjhch8$s1t$2@pita.alt.net...
    > In article <dRV6d.11223$Xd2.135@trndny01>, Tony wrote:
    > >
    > > "'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    > > fastest animals in the world'. With a person and sled attached, these

    dogs
    > > can run 3.2-minute miles for nearly twenty-five miles over a varied

    terrain
    > > that includes hills, curves, and woods".
    > >
    > > from "The Cruelest Miles: the heroic story of dogs and men in a race

    against
    > > an epidemic" - a good read.

    >
    > these dogs must be eating pasta!
    >
    > i


    I believe dogs do not need carbs as much as humans do; their metabolism is
    geared better to fat/protein IIRC.
     
  8. DrLith

    DrLith Guest

    "Tony" <qtrader2@(remove)hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:dRV6d.11223$Xd2.135@trndny01...
    >
    > "'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    > fastest animals in the world'. With a person and sled attached, these dogs
    > can run 3.2-minute miles for nearly twenty-five miles over a varied

    terrain
    > that includes hills, curves, and woods".


    Wow, that is pretty impressive. I had no idea sled dogs went that fast.
     
  9. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Sam wrote in message ...
    >
    >"Ignoramus29063" <ignoramus29063@NOSPAM.29063.invalid> wrote in message
    >news:cjhch8$s1t$2@pita.alt.net...
    >> In article <dRV6d.11223$Xd2.135@trndny01>, Tony wrote:
    >> >
    >> > "'When the distance is over ten miles, modern racing sled dogs are the
    >> > fastest animals in the world'. With a person and sled attached, these

    >dogs
    >> > can run 3.2-minute miles for nearly twenty-five miles over a varied

    >terrain
    >> > that includes hills, curves, and woods".
    >> >
    >> > from "The Cruelest Miles: the heroic story of dogs and men in a race

    >against
    >> > an epidemic" - a good read.

    >>
    >> these dogs must be eating pasta!
    >>
    >> i

    >
    >I believe dogs do not need carbs as much as humans do; their metabolism is
    >geared better to fat/protein IIRC.
    >


    If Dot ever bites on this thread she can perhaps enlighten us. It says in
    the book that the racing dogs are now even smaller than the Siberians that
    were then (1920's) gaining popularity in Alaska as being smaller and faster
    than the Malamutes, and that they're cross-bred with Irish setters and other
    faster short-haired breeds. I recall Dot saying that they take their dogs
    very seriously up there, and that what the racing mushers feed their teams
    is a closely held competitive secret.

    - T
     
  10. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tony wrote:
    > Sam wrote in message ...
    >
    >>I believe dogs do not need carbs as much as humans do; their metabolism is
    >>geared better to fat/protein IIRC.
    >>


    >
    > If Dot ever bites on this thread she can perhaps enlighten us.


    Actually, I looked in Amazon.com (have a coupon to use) to see more
    about the book, since it looked more interesting than the standard
    Iditarod book ;) I was trying to see how much of the original serum run
    story they told. Any comments on the book in general?


    It says in
    > the book that the racing dogs are now even smaller than the Siberians that
    > were then (1920's) gaining popularity in Alaska as being smaller and faster
    > than the Malamutes, and that they're cross-bred with Irish setters and other
    > faster short-haired breeds.


    The modern racing dogs are like pro marathoners - small and fast. They
    are a hybrid, but I can't remember what breeds might be involved - or
    *if* there is any standard. Other dogs have been bred for heavy pulls,
    like a tractor pull contest. Today's racing dogs are pulling sleds and
    loads that are much lighter than the older ones.


    I recall Dot saying that they take their dogs
    > very seriously up there, and that what the racing mushers feed their teams
    > is a closely held competitive secret.


    "Their food includes lots of protein, fat, and other high energy stuff.
    Some mushers make their own concoctions from ingredients like fish,
    hamburger, beef, horse meat, lamb, beaver, moose, caribou, and sometimes
    even seal meat."
    from
    http://www.iditarod.com/behind_race.html


    Just some examples of research. Keep in mind that the top long-distance
    dogs are professional athletes, although it's usually the musher that
    gets the sponsors, not the dogs themselves.
    http://www.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/128/12/2686S
    http://www.champainefreezedry.com/Modules/Nutrition/Nutrition1.aspx
    I think Iams has probably done a fair amount of research also.

    Sometimes, if we're lucky, they monitor the human performance as well as
    the dog's so we learn more about human physiology in cold weather sports.

    Google would probably pull up more on dog nutrition. I just posted a
    couple relevant links.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  11. Etherized

    Etherized Guest

    << Google would probably pull up more on dog nutrition. I just posted a
    couple relevant links.

    Dot >>

    Great work. Many thanks.

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  12. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Dot wrote in message ...
    >Tony wrote:
    >> Sam wrote in message ...
    >>
    >>>I believe dogs do not need carbs as much as humans do; their metabolism

    is
    >>>geared better to fat/protein IIRC.
    >>>

    >
    >>
    >> If Dot ever bites on this thread she can perhaps enlighten us.

    >
    >Actually, I looked in Amazon.com (have a coupon to use) to see more
    >about the book, since it looked more interesting than the standard
    >Iditarod book ;) I was trying to see how much of the original serum run
    >story they told. Any comments on the book in general?
    >


    The whole book was about the serum run, with a great number of historical
    side trips, including the attempts of many to have all or most of the serum
    flown in by plane, which was eventually tried but they failed to even get
    off the ground because it was the coldest winter in 20 years. I enjoyed
    reading it, there was alot about the 20+ teams of mushers who relayed the
    serum to Nome, and what happend to them from all the publicity afterwards.

    >
    >It says in
    >> the book that the racing dogs are now even smaller than the Siberians

    that
    >> were then (1920's) gaining popularity in Alaska as being smaller and

    faster
    >> than the Malamutes, and that they're cross-bred with Irish setters and

    other
    >> faster short-haired breeds.

    >
    >The modern racing dogs are like pro marathoners - small and fast. They
    >are a hybrid, but I can't remember what breeds might be involved - or
    >*if* there is any standard. Other dogs have been bred for heavy pulls,
    >like a tractor pull contest. Today's racing dogs are pulling sleds and
    >loads that are much lighter than the older ones.
    >
    >
    >I recall Dot saying that they take their dogs
    >> very seriously up there, and that what the racing mushers feed their

    teams
    >> is a closely held competitive secret.

    >
    >"Their food includes lots of protein, fat, and other high energy stuff.
    >Some mushers make their own concoctions from ingredients like fish,
    >hamburger, beef, horse meat, lamb, beaver, moose, caribou, and sometimes
    >even seal meat."
    >from
    >http://www.iditarod.com/behind_race.html
    >
    >
    >Just some examples of research. Keep in mind that the top long-distance
    >dogs are professional athletes, although it's usually the musher that
    >gets the sponsors, not the dogs themselves.
    >http://www.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/128/12/2686S
    >http://www.champainefreezedry.com/Modules/Nutrition/Nutrition1.aspx
    >I think Iams has probably done a fair amount of research also.
    >
    >Sometimes, if we're lucky, they monitor the human performance as well as
    >the dog's so we learn more about human physiology in cold weather sports.


    Agreed, that would be very interesting. In the book there were vivid
    descriptions of what happens to dogs and mushers at -63f and other
    conditions they faced and alot about the trails. I won't spoil it for you.
    Also there was a good brief history of the Inuit and the interior indians,
    the Athabascan, and how the Siberian dogs were brought over from... you
    guessed it Siberia. lol.

    - Tony
    >
    >Google would probably pull up more on dog nutrition. I just posted a
    >couple relevant links.
    >
    >Dot
    >
    >--
    >"So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    >away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
    >
     
  13. JMA

    JMA Guest

    "Tony" <qtrader2@(remove)hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:IQc7d.9080$r%4.6107@trndny05...
    > Dot wrote in message ...
    >>Tony wrote:
    >>> Sam wrote in message ...
    >>>
    >>>>I believe dogs do not need carbs as much as humans do; their metabolism

    > is
    >>>>geared better to fat/protein IIRC.
    >>>>

    >>
    >>>
    >>> If Dot ever bites on this thread she can perhaps enlighten us.

    >>
    >>Actually, I looked in Amazon.com (have a coupon to use) to see more
    >>about the book, since it looked more interesting than the standard
    >>Iditarod book ;) I was trying to see how much of the original serum run
    >>story they told. Any comments on the book in general?
    >>

    >
    > The whole book was about the serum run, with a great number of historical
    > side trips, including the attempts of many to have all or most of the
    > serum
    > flown in by plane, which was eventually tried but they failed to even get
    > off the ground because it was the coldest winter in 20 years. I enjoyed
    > reading it, there was alot about the 20+ teams of mushers who relayed the
    > serum to Nome, and what happend to them from all the publicity afterwards.
    >


    Thanks for the book info. DH is a former dogsledder and is still into the
    sport (vicaroiusly). It sounds like a great read for him!

    Jenn
     
Loading...

Share This Page

Loading...