A Story about Seized BB Cups

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kenny Lee, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    Was out on one of my daily rides when I noticed that the lateral play from my cranks had gotten
    noticeably worse. A year and a half ago the lateral play was 0.2mm. Now it was 2.0mm. I really
    dreaded the thought of having to disassemble the BB because I know I had already just about
    stripped the drive side cup splines flat the last time I tried to get at the BB(failed attempt).
    The non-drive side cup was in worse condition, the splines being worn down by the bb spindle
    thrashing about. The moment of truth had arrived, I was gonna get my cherry popped on this job. Two
    weeks ago successfully rebuilt my rear boutique wheel, albeit with a lot of trial an error. Learned
    to find tune the derailleur system, more trial and error. And now this. My first reaction was to
    take my bike to the big city and have a well known LBS proprietor give it a go. What a pain that
    would be 220km one way and no assurances that it will succeed. My friend a locksmith by trade and a
    bike fiend/tinkerer said bring the bike on over and let me give it a try. My thoughts were upon
    hearing this was, "this guy can pick locks maybe he can figure this out." At his shop he began with
    the drive side cup first because the other side's splines were in worse shape. Angling the BBT-5
    tool so it could catch hold of whatever was left of the BB cup spline we managed to wrench it out
    of the BB shell part way so that about a quarter inch of cup was extended out from the BB shell. At
    that point we used vise grips and clamped onto it and cranked the sucker out. Took about 40
    minutes. Some brown water came dribbling out (rust) and when we popped the BB out little ball
    barings spilled out. The BB itself came out of the bike dismembered. My friend said it was toast.
    Actually, when it first came out it looked more like a turd with all that rust and gunk on it. Now
    for the non-drive side cup. There was no way the BBT-5 was gonna work on it. Nothing to grip onto.
    Tried to pound it out with a screwdriver and hammer. All we got for our troubles were metal
    shavings on the floor. We gave up after 2 hours of pounding on it. We thought about putting the saw
    to it but decided that it would be too chancy being that the bike was an expensive CF one (I
    chickened out). Was going to box it up and have it shipped to a professional frame builder when I
    remembered that there was one LBS in town which I never went to because all he has is Giant stuff
    and Shimano. What the heck it wouldn't hurt seeking his opinion. Well the owner said he'd need to
    have a look at it before he can make a determination. He told me to bring the frame in the next
    morning. I was sure he was he wasn't up to the job. The next morning I bring the frame in. While
    he's looking it over I'm wondering where the FedEx office is, what's the turnaround time gonna be
    etc. The owner mentions things like we can soak it in "xyz" solution for a couple of days maybe
    this will loosen the bond, or we can saw it out. And then on the other hand...(he gets up to go
    into the back storage room). Hey what's that? I ask. You know, he says, I haven't taken this out in
    15 odd years. Park makes a similar one, he says. I didn't know what I was looking at at the time
    but now I recognize it as a tool for facing and threading the BB shell. It was all rusty looking
    and it was custom built too (cheaper that way). It had the mechanics of a table vise only the
    opposing ends were cylindrical and moved independent of each other with their own wrenching
    handles. With one end of device squishing the outside of the cup and the opposite end of the device
    pushing the cup from the inside and turning the handles in the correct direction the cup eased out
    of the frame. Needless to say I was awestruck. I asked him how much. Forget it, he says, free. Cool
    dude, I'll be back that's for sure. Now if only he carried Phil Wood BBs.

    Kenny Lee
     
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  2. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 18 Dec 2002 02:01:34 +0800, <[email protected]>, Kenny Lee
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You know, he says, I haven't taken this out in 15 odd years. Park makes a similar one, he says. I
    > didn't know what I was looking at at the time but now I recognize it as a tool for facing and
    > threading the BB shell.

    I had a similar problem and solved it with a couple nuts and a big bolt. About two weeks after that
    I discovered this article on Sheldon Brown's website describing the exact procedure I'd used.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tooltips/bbcups.html
    --
    zk
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Kenny Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >what's that? I ask. You know, he says, I haven't taken this out in 15 odd years. Park makes a
    >similar one, he says. I didn't know what I was looking at at the time but now I recognize it as a
    >tool for facing and threading the BB shell. It was all rusty looking and it was custom built too
    >(cheaper that way). It had the mechanics of a table vise only the opposing ends were cylindrical
    >and moved independent of each other with their own wrenching handles. With one end of device
    >squishing the outside of the cup and the opposite end of the device pushing the cup from the inside
    >and turning the handles in the correct direction the cup eased out of the frame.

    Var made a bottom bracket tool like that which clamps inside and outside of the BB cup, perhaps that
    is what it was; it can be quite useful in that situation.
     
  4. Alan

    Alan Guest

    That was called a Kingsbridge tool. My old Third Hand catalog listed one for about $30, if I
    recall right.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

    "Kenny Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Was out on one of my daily rides when I noticed that the lateral play from my cranks had gotten
    > noticeably worse. A year and a half ago the lateral play was 0.2mm. Now it was 2.0mm. I really
    > dreaded the thought of having to disassemble the BB because I know I had already just about
    > stripped the drive side cup splines flat the last time I tried to get at the BB(failed attempt).
    > The non-drive side cup was in worse condition, the splines being worn down by the bb spindle
    > thrashing about. The moment of truth had arrived, I was gonna get my cherry popped on this job.
    > Two weeks ago successfully rebuilt my rear boutique wheel, albeit with a lot of trial an error.
    > Learned to find tune the derailleur system, more trial and error. And now this. My first reaction
    > was to take my bike to the big city and have a well known LBS proprietor give it a go. What a pain
    > that would be 220km one way and no assurances that it will succeed. My friend a locksmith by trade
    > and a bike fiend/tinkerer said bring the bike on over and let me give it a try. My thoughts were
    > upon hearing this was, "this guy can pick locks maybe he can figure this out." At his shop he
    > began with the drive side cup first because the other side's splines were in worse shape. Angling
    > the BBT-5 tool so it could catch hold of whatever was left of the BB cup spline we managed to
    > wrench it out of the BB shell part way so that about a quarter inch of cup was extended out from
    > the BB shell. At that point we used vise grips and clamped onto it and cranked the sucker out.
    > Took about 40 minutes. Some brown water came dribbling out (rust) and when we popped the BB out
    > little ball barings spilled out. The BB itself came out of the bike dismembered. My friend said it
    > was toast. Actually, when it first came out it looked more like a turd with all that rust and gunk
    > on it. Now for the non-drive side cup. There was no way the BBT-5 was gonna work on it. Nothing to
    > grip onto. Tried to pound it out with a screwdriver and hammer. All we got for our troubles were
    > metal shavings on the floor. We gave up after 2 hours of pounding on it. We thought about putting
    > the saw to it but decided that it would be too chancy being that the bike was an expensive CF one
    > (I chickened out). Was going to box it up and have it shipped to a professional frame builder when
    > I remembered that there was one LBS in town which I never went to because all he has is Giant
    > stuff and Shimano. What the heck it wouldn't hurt seeking his opinion. Well the owner said he'd
    > need to have a look at it before he can make a determination. He told me to bring the frame in the
    > next morning. I was sure he was he wasn't up to the job. The next morning I bring the frame in.
    > While he's looking it over I'm wondering where the FedEx office is, what's the turnaround time
    > gonna be etc. The owner mentions things like we can soak it in "xyz" solution for a couple of days
    > maybe this will loosen the bond, or we can saw it out. And then on the other hand...(he gets up to
    > go into the back storage room). Hey what's that? I ask. You know, he says, I haven't taken this
    > out in 15 odd years. Park makes a similar one, he says. I didn't know what I was looking at at the
    > time but now I recognize it as a tool for facing and threading the BB shell. It was all rusty
    > looking and it was custom built too (cheaper that way). It had the mechanics of a table vise only
    > the opposing ends were cylindrical and moved independent of each other with their own wrenching
    > handles. With one end of device squishing the outside of the cup and the opposite end of the
    > device pushing the cup from the inside and turning the handles in the correct direction the cup
    > eased out of the frame. Needless to say I was awestruck. I asked him how much. Forget it, he says,
    > free. Cool dude, I'll be back that's for sure. Now if only he carried Phil Wood BBs.
    >
    > Kenny Lee
     
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