Baked french toast

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by serene, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > "Jen" <[email protected]> wrote in news:NVaRf.5342$dy4.4561
    > @news-server.bigpond.net.au:
    >
    > >>> Baked french toast
    > >>>
    > >>> Enough bread to cover the bottom of a rectangular baking pan (It took
    > >>> me 5 slices, with the fifth torn in half)
    > >>> 6 eggs
    > >>> 1 cup milk (I was out of milk, so I used soymilk)
    > >>> 1 tablespoon each cinnamon and sugar
    > >>> a little grated fresh nutmeg

    > >
    > >
    > > Sounds like Bread and Butter Pudding.
    > >
    > > Jen

    >
    >
    > Jen,
    >
    > You should add a shot of Grand Marnier into the batter and omit the
    > sugar.
    >
    > Imho,
    >
    > Andy


    Oh..... Gods that sounds good!
    Or any other flavored liquor.

    Maybe some Chambord??????
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     


  2. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    >>You should add a shot of Grand Marnier into the batter and omit the
    >>sugar.
    >>
    >>Andy

    >
    >
    > Oh..... Gods that sounds good!
    > Or any other flavored liquor.
    >
    > Maybe some Chambord?



    Oddly enough, no. I hope you experiment; I certainly did, but when I
    saw the suggestion (from this list) to add a little Grand Marnier to the
    french toast batter, I tried all sorts of liquors and liqueurs and
    discovered that Grand Marnier really is the best. Rum or cognac were
    acceptable, but the flavor was off with the others I tried. I'd love it
    if you experimented similarly and reported back to us with your results.
    I use a teaspoon of Grand Marnier in a mix of one egg and 1/3 cup milk.


    --Lia
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > >>You should add a shot of Grand Marnier into the batter and omit the
    > >>sugar.
    > >>
    > >>Andy

    > >
    > >
    > > Oh..... Gods that sounds good!
    > > Or any other flavored liquor.
    > >
    > > Maybe some Chambord?

    >
    >
    > Oddly enough, no. I hope you experiment; I certainly did, but when I
    > saw the suggestion (from this list) to add a little Grand Marnier to the
    > french toast batter, I tried all sorts of liquors and liqueurs and
    > discovered that Grand Marnier really is the best. Rum or cognac were
    > acceptable, but the flavor was off with the others I tried. I'd love it
    > if you experimented similarly and reported back to us with your results.
    > I use a teaspoon of Grand Marnier in a mix of one egg and 1/3 cup milk.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >


    I've not made French toast in ages... :) Might be about time, and serve
    with bacon.

    Grand Marnier is Orange flavored, so I wonder if you could just use
    Triple Sec? Chambord is raspberry flavored so I guess it would depend on
    what you were going for.

    I add rum or brandy to hot cocoa or Mocha during the winter. ;-d
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  4. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > Grand Marnier is Orange flavored, so I wonder if you could just use
    > Triple Sec? Chambord is raspberry flavored so I guess it would depend on
    > what you were going for.



    It is always so hard to say what the problem is when flavors are off,
    but my guess in this case is that Chambord doesn't work because it is
    more sugar and less alcohol. The Grand Marnier works because you get
    just the hint of orange and alcohol in the form of an aromatic. If I
    wanted the Chambord flavor, I'd add it somehow to the syrup (or use it
    straight!) (But don't sit there listening to me. Try it for yourself.)


    --Lia
     
  5. dee

    dee Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > I add rum or brandy to hot cocoa or Mocha during the winter. ;-d


    Thanks.. that's something new to me sounds great! It is like hot
    Baileys..?
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "dee" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1142258546.742798.108810
    @e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com:

    >
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >> I add rum or brandy to hot cocoa or Mocha during the winter. ;-d

    >
    > Thanks.. that's something new to me sounds great! It is like hot
    > Baileys..?



    Then there's always a drip or two of Bailey's Irish Cream in yer coffee on
    a weekend morning! ;)

    Andy
     
  7. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > Grand Marnier is Orange flavored, so I wonder if you could just use
    > > Triple Sec? Chambord is raspberry flavored so I guess it would depend on
    > > what you were going for.

    >
    >
    > It is always so hard to say what the problem is when flavors are off,
    > but my guess in this case is that Chambord doesn't work because it is
    > more sugar and less alcohol. The Grand Marnier works because you get
    > just the hint of orange and alcohol in the form of an aromatic. If I
    > wanted the Chambord flavor, I'd add it somehow to the syrup (or use it
    > straight!) (But don't sit there listening to me. Try it for yourself.)
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >


    Yeah, I could see using Chambord in ........... a raspberry, blackberry or
    blueberry syrup, but not in the batter itself. Grand Marnier I can see in
    the batter or maybe even a banana or peach schnapps?

    kili
     
  8. ~patches~

    ~patches~ Guest

    Andy wrote:

    > "dee" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1142258546.742798.108810
    > @e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com:
    >
    >
    >>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >>
    >>>I add rum or brandy to hot cocoa or Mocha during the winter. ;-d

    >>
    >>Thanks.. that's something new to me sounds great! It is like hot
    >>Baileys..?

    >
    >
    >
    > Then there's always a drip or two of Bailey's Irish Cream in yer coffee on
    > a weekend morning! ;)
    >
    > Andy


    Make sure to follow that up with a screwdriver to get your daily dose of
    vit C! We learned both tricks in Vegas :)
     
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    ~patches~ <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Andy wrote:
    >
    >> "dee" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1142258546.742798.108810
    >> @e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com:
    >>
    >>
    >>>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I add rum or brandy to hot cocoa or Mocha during the winter. ;-d
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.. that's something new to me sounds great! It is like hot
    >>>Baileys..?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Then there's always a drip or two of Bailey's Irish Cream in yer
    >> coffee on a weekend morning! ;)
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Make sure to follow that up with a screwdriver to get your daily dose
    > of vit C! We learned both tricks in Vegas :)



    ROFL!!!

    Andy
     
  10. serene

    serene Guest

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 09:27:09 GMT, "Jen" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>> Baked french toast
    >>>
    >>> Enough bread to cover the bottom of a rectangular baking pan (It took
    >>> me 5 slices, with the fifth torn in half)
    >>> 6 eggs
    >>> 1 cup milk (I was out of milk, so I used soymilk)
    >>> 1 tablespoon each cinnamon and sugar
    >>> a little grated fresh nutmeg

    >
    >
    >Sounds like Bread and Butter Pudding.


    Except it's one layer, and the pieces stay separate (plus, no butter).

    serene
     
  11. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    serene wrote:
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 09:27:09 GMT, "Jen" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>> Baked french toast
    >>>>
    >>>> Enough bread to cover the bottom of a rectangular baking pan (It
    >>>> took me 5 slices, with the fifth torn in half)
    >>>> 6 eggs
    >>>> 1 cup milk (I was out of milk, so I used soymilk)
    >>>> 1 tablespoon each cinnamon and sugar
    >>>> a little grated fresh nutmeg

    >>
    >>
    >> Sounds like Bread and Butter Pudding.

    >
    > Except it's one layer, and the pieces stay separate (plus, no butter).
    >
    > serene


    I've had a recipe for years similar to this for years. It was geared
    towards low-fat cooking and I might have gotten the recipe from Glamour
    Magazine or maybe even Cosmopolitan, over 20 years ago. Where it says
    butter you can use margarine or other substitutes if you believe it's better
    for you. I used skim milk but that's what I like to drink so I keep it
    around; you can use whole milk if you want to :)

    Fancy French Toast for Two

    Four 1-inch slices of day old french bread
    1/4 c. milk
    1-1/2 Tbs. butter
    2 beaten eggs or a beaten egg substitute
    1/4 c. natural orange juice
    1 Tbs. honey
    1/2 c. cornflake crumbs

    Arrange bread slices in a shallow pan. In a small bowl blend together the
    eggs, milk, orange juice and honey. Pour over the bread. Turn each slice
    of bread to coat well. Cover and refrigerate for several hours or
    overnight.

    Heat the oven to 475F degrees. Melt butter in an 8x8 baking dish. Remove
    bread from the egg mixture; let excess liquid drain. Dip the bread in
    crushed cornflake crumbs to coat. Arrange in a single layer in the baking
    dish in the hot butter. Bake about 8 minutes each side, turning once or
    until golden brown. Drizzle the french toast with honey or real maple
    syrup.

    My serving suggestions: fresh berries (with or without cream). Sprinkle
    the french toast with a little (very little) cinnamon. Me, I'd like a
    couple of strips of bacon on the side :)

    Jill
     
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