Bicycling in 30-40F Temperatures

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Robert, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. Robert

    Robert Guest

    I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high
    temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours daily (one or two stops for lunch
    and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to be
    completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress?
    This is what I was thinking:

    1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    2. 200 wt fleece
    3. Breathable rain jacket
    4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    5. Windproof gloves
    6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks

    Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?
     
    Tags:


  2. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    This has been covered *a lot* ... recently, (within a 3-4 days) on rec.bicycles.tech

    Do a search and you'll find tons of stuff I'm sure, also this past month or so it was discussed
    heavily in the e-mail list of www.massbike.org It was a *hot* topic (pun intended) when the
    temperature around these parts was hovering in the 0F range.

    C.Q.C.
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    For me, it would. Depending on how hard I'm riding, it might be too much, but taking off the rain
    jacket would probably fix that.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  4. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for
    lunch
    > and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to be completly warm and do not want
    > to feel the cold. How should I
    dress?
    > This is what I was thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    I do cycle frequently in that sort of weather and I would be too hot in the clothes you describe.
    The problem is that if you are initially warm, for the first few miles, you will overheat within the
    next few miles. I generally wear a light syntheic short sleeve jersey and padded shorts under
    breathable rain pants and jacket (rain or not), smart wool socks and Shimano mountainbike boots,
    Neoprene gloves, and a thin wool skullcap or a Pearl Izumi microfleece headband. The only thing that
    changes is sometimes I wear heavier or lighter gloves instead and I switch the cap for the headband
    and add or remove a helmet cover to fine tune the temperature. Works for me from 27F to 50F.
     
  5. Badger South

    Badger South Guest

    On 1 Feb 2004 21:29:41 -0800, [email protected] (Robert) wrote:

    >I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours daily
    >(one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to be
    >completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was thinking:
    >
    >1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    >2. 200 wt fleece
    >3. Breathable rain jacket
    >4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    >5. Windproof gloves
    >6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    >Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    I'd add a balaclava to keep your head/ears warm. The rain pants seem excessive, but it depends on
    the rain. IOW, I don't mind the lower body getting a little damp. I have a pair of water resistant
    shorts that I sometimes wear that keep me dry enough down there. Instead of the LS cotton T and
    fleece, why not wear a biking jersey, and a light wool LS sweater?

    As to the rain jacket <g> in my experience, a breathable rain jacket doesn't keep you dry from the
    rain, and doesn't really breath that much. I'm a big fan of relatively cheap PVC rain jackets. (For
    $19, I got two at A&N.) Some people like the more expensive gortex jackets, but IME, it's for
    fashion related reasons. ;-p

    What, exactly, are the type of gloves you have. (I'm in the market).

    -B
     
  6. "Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times.

    I know what this is like very well.

    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)

    skip it.

    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket

    These are fine.

    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants

    I'd skip the rain pants, and have a winter-weight pair of tights. Your legs might get wet from time
    to time, but you'll be working them, and it won't be troublesome.

    > 5. Windproof gloves

    I have learned the hard way that most windproof gloves do not have sufficient gel for me for a
    5 hour ride. I'd have to wear my fingerless summer gloves under those to have enough padding.
    My fingers get cold very easily -- I might have a chemical packet to break and warm them up,
    just in case.

    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks

    I'd put booties over cycling shoes. Smart Wool trail runner (not their cycling socks) I think are
    the best for cycling.

    I'd add a bandana to wear around the neck and use as a hankie -- if it's cold and wet, my nose would
    be running nearly continuously.

    Visibility is an issue in the wintertime in dismal weather -- if the jacket isn't a high-visibility
    color, I'd add a reflective vest.

    For me, it would have to be below 28 F to put on a balaclava. However, I've got a thick head of
    bushy hair, and I can pull it down over my ears (and do!) when it's cold and wet. If you just tell
    the barber, "set it to 3" or you're bald, YMMV.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
    My bookshelf: http://www.bookcrossing.com/mybookshelf/Cpetersky

    "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
    was you."

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
    My bookshelf: http://www.bookcrossing.com/mybookshelf/Cpetersky

    "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
    was you."
     
  7. Tanya Quinn

    Tanya Quinn Guest

    [email protected] (Robert) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    Probably but it depends on you, and I'd be concerned about sweating and having the wetness trapped
    in the cotton shirt. I find that when its cold the places I get cold first are fingers, toes, ears,
    and neck. I would add a headband that covers the ears to your list, that fits under a helmet. If you
    don't wear a helmet I would go for a toque instead (since the helmet does help block the wind from
    your head) - depending on temperature. Unless your other layers do a good job of covering the neck,
    add a neck warmer or scarf. And of course its handy if you have a place to stash the extra clothes
    if you get too hot. Don't forget too that if there is a strong wind and you're riding into it,
    you'll feel a lot colder than the actual temperature.
     
  8. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Robert" wrote ...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)

    If you know about cotton, why are you planning to wear the filthy stuff? There's a reason why
    mountaineers say "cotton kills".

    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    Everyone's meatabolism is different, and different people have different ideas about what
    constitutes "casual bicycling", so what works for people replying to your post might not
    work for you.

    I've been shying away from waterproof/breathable jackets for cycling because
    1), all the greasy goop that gets kicked up by cars in the rain compromises the breathability and 2)
    they actually perform best at much lower temperatures than you describe. I also favor cheap water
    repellent shell pants for rain for the same reasons.

    Where's your hat? Keeping your head and neck covered will go along ways toward keeping your whole
    body warm. If you're wearing a helmet there are plenty of thin fleece and wool hats and/or
    balaclavas around designed to go under bicycle, ski, and mountaineering helmets. HTH,
    --
    mark
     
  9. mark <[email protected]> wrote:
    : If you're wearing a helmet there are plenty of thin fleece and wool hats and/or balaclavas around
    : designed to go under bicycle, ski, and mountaineering helmets.

    a balaclava is serious overkill for 30 to 40F. i use a neck gaitor below 50F and add a second one
    under 20F.

    for 40s i wear regular shorts, leg warmers, normal lightweight wool socks, booties if it's raining,
    a l/s wool base layer and a l/s wool jersey. in the 30s (or 40s raining) i swap the l/s jersey for a
    s/s jersey, keep the base layer and add a sugoi windhibitor evaporator zip jersey. for the 20s back
    to the l/s jersey with the base layer and sugoi jersey and add thick wool socks.

    for gloves a pair of pearl izumi pittards thermal fleece with 1 or 2 wool liners depending (they fit
    under pretty easily .. these gloves aren't tight fitting even in the right size).

    much below 20 is where it gets tougher.
    - david reuteler [email protected]
     
  10. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s53>, [email protected] potato.com says...
    > "Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times.
    >
    > I know what this is like very well.
    >
    > > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    >
    > skip it.

    Maybe not. Might want to put it _over_ a wicking layer.

    >
    > > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    >
    > These are fine.
    >
    > > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    >
    > I'd skip the rain pants, and have a winter-weight pair of tights. Your legs might get wet from
    > time to time, but you'll be working them, and it won't be troublesome.

    Maybe windfront tights, though they tend to get expensive.

    > > 5. Windproof gloves
    >
    > I have learned the hard way that most windproof gloves do not have sufficient gel for me for a 5
    > hour ride. I'd have to wear my fingerless summer gloves under those to have enough padding. My
    > fingers get cold very easily -- I might have a chemical packet to break and warm them up, just
    > in case.

    For me, in temps down to the upper 20's (F), I put a pair of size extra-large summer cycling gloves
    _over_ my thin Pearl Izumi full- finger gloves, and once my vascular system kicks in, about 5 - 10
    minutes into the ride, my fingers are toasty. This also gives me good dexterity for operating the
    STI shifters. I've never tried this combination in the rain, though, so I don't know how they'd do
    if they got wet.

    When I was out riding below zero a couple of weeks ago, I put big fleece-lined leather mittens
    over the PI gloves, and was also toasty. Amazingly, I was still able to shift ok, as long as I
    wasn't in a hurry.

    >
    > > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > I'd put booties over cycling shoes. Smart Wool trail runner (not their cycling socks) I think are
    > the best for cycling.
    >
    > I'd add a bandana to wear around the neck and use as a hankie -- if it's cold and wet, my nose
    > would be running nearly continuously.

    For me, it just takes cold to make my nose run, but I just send a snot rocket onto the shoulder of
    the road every few minutes.

    > Visibility is an issue in the wintertime in dismal weather -- if the jacket isn't a high-
    > visibility color, I'd add a reflective vest.

    Good point.

    > For me, it would have to be below 28 F to put on a balaclava. However, I've got a thick head of
    > bushy hair, and I can pull it down over my ears (and do!) when it's cold and wet. If you just tell
    > the barber, "set it to 3" or you're bald, YMMV.

    Yeah; for me, below about 20 is where I start needing full face protection.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > mark <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : If you're wearing a helmet there are plenty of thin fleece and wool hats and/or balaclavas
    > : around designed to go under bicycle, ski, and mountaineering helmets.
    >
    > a balaclava is serious overkill for 30 to 40F. i use a neck gaitor below 50F and add a second one
    > under 20F.

    I just use a l/s turtleneck shirt.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  12. On 02 Feb 2004 19:41:00 GMT, David Reuteler <[email protected]> wrote:

    >a balaclava is serious overkill for 30 to 40F. i use a neck gaitor below 50F and add a second one
    >under 20F.

    Depends. For some of us, it seems the cheekbones are the ones that feel most exposed. OTOH, I've
    never been able to wear one because of eyeglass fogging.

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on two wheels...
     
  13. David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    : I just use a l/s turtleneck shirt.

    yea it's funny. everyone's different but my achilles heel is very much my throat. if it's warm i'm
    ok .. but if it's cold even in the 50s i'll get sick pretty fast but i've never worn a balaclava
    ever in minnesota. when it got really cold i'd take a cotton t-shirt, hold it by the sleeves and
    loop the body over the top a few times, tie the sleeves behind my neck and tuck the remaining body
    down my jacket. that worked all the way down to -20F which is as cold as i've ever biked.

    i, like claire, have a lot of hair, tho.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  14. "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > i, like claire, have a lot of hair, tho.

    Picture?

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
    My bookshelf: http://www.bookcrossing.com/mybookshelf/Cpetersky

    "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
    was you."
     
  15. Claire Petersky <[email protected]> wrote:
    : "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:[email protected]...
    :
    :> i, like claire, have a lot of hair, tho.
    :
    : Picture?

    ummm, it's certainly not quite as "full" as yours. i have a lot of very fine dredd-prone hair &
    unfortunately can't find any photos online of that at its best. i've seen photos of you from your
    site, tho and you easily win for volume.

    http://www.visi.com/~reuteler/images/car.jpg (leftmost, 1994)
    http://banzai.msi.umn.edu/dave/images/daveymegreg.jpg (leftmost, 1996)
    http://www.visi.com/~reuteler/images/montreal.jpeg (rightside, 1995)
    http://myweb.cableone.net/reuteler/images/bogus_me.jpg (last fall 2003)
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  16. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Robert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > thinking:
    >
    > 1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > 2. 200 wt fleece
    > 3. Breathable rain jacket
    > 4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > 5. Windproof gloves
    > 6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    > Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    30-40 degree rain is about the toughest condition to dress for. If it's dry, it's no biggie. Fenders
    make a huge difference in cold rain, especially with a front (at least mud flap).
     
  17. Robert

    Robert Guest

    Badger South <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 1 Feb 2004 21:29:41 -0800, [email protected] (Robert) wrote:
    >
    > >I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    > >daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to
    > >be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was
    > >thinking:
    > >
    > >1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    > >2. 200 wt fleece
    > >3. Breathable rain jacket
    > >4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    > >5. Windproof gloves
    > >6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    > >
    > >Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?
    >
    > I'd add a balaclava to keep your head/ears warm. The rain pants seem excessive, but it depends on
    > the rain. IOW, I don't mind the lower body getting a little damp. I have a pair of water resistant
    > shorts that I sometimes wear that keep me dry enough down there. Instead of the LS cotton T and
    > fleece, why not wear a biking jersey, and a light wool LS sweater?
    >
    > As to the rain jacket <g> in my experience, a breathable rain jacket doesn't keep you dry from the
    > rain, and doesn't really breath that much. I'm a big fan of relatively cheap PVC rain jackets.
    > (For $19, I got two at A&N.) Some people like the more expensive gortex jackets, but IME, it's for
    > fashion related reasons. ;-p
    >
    > What, exactly, are the type of gloves you have. (I'm in the market).
    >
    > -B

    Thank you for your advice. I'm just a casual bicyclist who has started last year to bicycle on his
    vacations. With all the expensive synthetic stuff I would have to buy for cold temperaturers I think
    I'm going to postpone my trip until the spring. I did buy a pair of EMS WindPro men's gloves (on
    sale at $19.00) but they are now sold out on the website. You might call see if the catalog can find
    any in the stores (there is a decent chance they will find a pair). There are also another pair of
    excellent gloves that just went on sale (from $35.00 to $24.00) online that are windproof. These are
    very high tech that allows protection and excellent deterity. You can find them at:

    http://www.ems.com/products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524442583774&FOLDER%3C%3Efold-
    er_id=2534374302580379&fromTemplate=navigation%2Fsubcategory.jsp&bmUID=1075765400329
     
  18. gatorbike

    gatorbike New Member

    Joined:
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    I ride upto -20 and a foot of snow in my commute to work.

    1. t-shirt (cotton and I know) <i've gotton a propper cycling under shirt>
    2. long sleeve cotten
    3. a pull-over (kangaroo) with a hood
    4. a nylon pull over
    5. winter tights and a regular pair of walking shorts over top
    6.wool socks and put sandwhich bags over them and into your shoes
    7. gloves, get the crab claw type they are really good.
    8. grab a cycling hood, they are the best

    You should be warm, just keep your feet and toes moving and you'll be fine. I have a 1/2 trip each way to work and rarely do I have a problem and I work outside in this all day long too.
     
  19. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Robert) wrote:

    >I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours daily
    >(one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want to be
    >completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress? This is what I was thinking:
    >
    >1. Long sleeve cotton t-shirt (I know about cotton)
    >2. 200 wt fleece
    >3. Breathable rain jacket
    >4. Light tights covered by rain pants
    >5. Windproof gloves
    >6. Waterproofed sneakers with Smart Wool socks
    >
    >Will this outfit keep me comfortably warm?

    Sure seems like it...

    For 30's to 40's (0 to 15c) I'll normally wear shorts and a short sleeve jersey, and a light jacket.
    If it warms up to around 45, I'll just take off the jacket.

    If I wear more than that I'm more miserable from sweating than I ever would be from the cold.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  20. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>, Robert <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Badger South <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >> On 1 Feb 2004 21:29:41 -0800, [email protected] (Robert) wrote:
    >>
    >> >I may be casual bicycling (not racing or anything) in high temperatures of 30-40F for 5 hours
    >> >daily (one or two stops for lunch and hot coco). It may be raining or snowing at times. I want
    >> >to be completly warm and do not want to feel the cold. How should I dress?
    [snip]
    >
    >
    >Thank you for your advice. I'm just a casual bicyclist who has started last year to bicycle on his
    >vacations. With all the expensive synthetic stuff I would have to buy for cold temperaturers I
    >think I'm going to postpone my trip until the spring. I did buy a pair of EMS WindPro men's gloves
    >(on sale at $19.00) but they are now sold out on the website. You might call see if the catalog can
    >find any in the stores (there is a decent chance they will find a pair). There are also another
    >pair of excellent gloves that just went on sale (from $35.00 to $24.00) online that are windproof.
    >These are very high tech that allows protection and excellent deterity. You can find them at:
    >
    >http://www.ems.com/products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524442583774&FOLDER%3C%3Efol-
    >der_id=2534374302580379&fromTemplate=navigation%2Fsubcategory.jsp&bmUID=1075765400329

    _ Synthetic doesn't have to mean expensive. You can get perfectly useful poly gear at Walmart. Or
    you can get most outdoor gear at at least 50% off if you're willing to buy last year's gear.

    _ Try www.campmor.com and www.sierratradingpost.com to get some non-cotton cheap inner layers.
    Cotton and 40degrees and rain is a recipe for a miserable day at best and hypothermia at worst.

    _ Booker C. Bense

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