Bike and AMericans

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Red Cloud, Apr 18, 2004.

  1. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    question
    to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    americans would.
    Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    American.
    And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    bike
    when they are addicted to clean their automobile.

    For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    can't afford car.

    I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    how could find your bike)
     
    Tags:


  2. psycholist

    psycholist Guest

    "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > question
    > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > americans would.
    > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > American.
    > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > bike
    > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    >
    > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > can't afford car.
    >
    > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > how could find your bike)


    Red Cloud,

    From your other post on this newsgroup, you obviously live in California.
    Taking California as representative of all of America is like taking
    television programming as representative of real life.

    I wish cycling were more popular here, but it's not as unpopular as you make
    it out to be. The love affair with the car stems in part from the fact that
    we have land here. We're not piled on top of each other like in some
    European countries. And we're allowed to own land here ... unlike in some
    countries. The distances between our places are more vast. Maybe not where
    you are in California, but it's true in many other places. We have longer
    distances to travel and we have a good road system to facilitate it.

    But some of the largest and most successful bicycle companies are here and
    we're an important export market for European and Asian bicycle companies.
    Some of those bikes gather dust in people's garages. Some actually get used
    .... regularly.

    I attended a cycling event yesterday in a remote town called Clark's Hill,
    SC. I don't know what the population is there, but it's VERY small. The
    event drew from miles around, though and hundreds of people showed up --
    hundreds of mostly very fit and healthy Americans who love to ride their
    bikes.

    Don't judge America by California. Don't call the USA "America," either ...
    Canadians and Mexicans and others get offended 'cuz they're American's, too.

    I heard a good one the other day ... how many Frenchmen does it take to
    defend Paris? Nobody knows ... it's never been done. I guess all Frenchmen
    are cowards, eh?

    Bob C.
     
  3. Q.

    Q. Guest

    "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    <snip a buncha junk about how Amerikanskis suck>

    --------------------------
    /| /| | |
    ||__|| | Please don't |
    / O O\__ feed |
    / \ the trolls |
    / \ \ |
    / _ \ \ ----------------------
    / |\____\ \ ||
    / | | | |\____/ ||
    / \|_|_|/ | __||
    / / \ |____| ||
    / | | /| | --|
    | | |// |____ --|
    * _ | |_|_|_| | \-/
    *-- _--\ _ \ // |
    / _ \\ _ // | /
    * / \_ /- | - | |
    * ___ c_c_c_C/ \C_c_c_c____________


    Thank you!
    C.Q.C.
     
  4. AustinMN

    AustinMN Guest

    Red Cloud <[email protected]>

    > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > how could find your bike)


    Note how he suggest he in US. In other thread he call himself American.
    Note how Yahoo address is .UK.

    How troll continues because we feed him!

    Austin
     
  5. SniffinVinyl

    SniffinVinyl Guest

    Good post, unfortunately this guy looks like a troll. Most of his
    observations are likely true, but he displays no understanding of why there
    are differences with Europe, and yet in the same breath is making an implied
    judgement.

    Also, an observation from a Canadian, most of us do not think of ourselves
    as Americans, perhaps we are better described as North Americans. I think
    that for most of the rest of the world including Canada the term 'American'
    applies to the USA.


    Sniffinvinyl



    "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > > question
    > > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > > americans would.
    > > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > > American.
    > > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > > bike
    > > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    > >
    > > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > > can't afford car.
    > >
    > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > how could find your bike)

    >
    > Red Cloud,
    >
    > From your other post on this newsgroup, you obviously live in California.
    > Taking California as representative of all of America is like taking
    > television programming as representative of real life.
    >
    > I wish cycling were more popular here, but it's not as unpopular as you

    make
    > it out to be. The love affair with the car stems in part from the fact

    that
    > we have land here. We're not piled on top of each other like in some
    > European countries. And we're allowed to own land here ... unlike in some
    > countries. The distances between our places are more vast. Maybe not

    where
    > you are in California, but it's true in many other places. We have longer
    > distances to travel and we have a good road system to facilitate it.
    >
    > But some of the largest and most successful bicycle companies are here and
    > we're an important export market for European and Asian bicycle companies.
    > Some of those bikes gather dust in people's garages. Some actually get

    used
    > ... regularly.
    >
    > I attended a cycling event yesterday in a remote town called Clark's Hill,
    > SC. I don't know what the population is there, but it's VERY small. The
    > event drew from miles around, though and hundreds of people showed up --
    > hundreds of mostly very fit and healthy Americans who love to ride their
    > bikes.
    >
    > Don't judge America by California. Don't call the USA "America," either

    ....
    > Canadians and Mexicans and others get offended 'cuz they're American's,

    too.
    >
    > I heard a good one the other day ... how many Frenchmen does it take to
    > defend Paris? Nobody knows ... it's never been done. I guess all

    Frenchmen
    > are cowards, eh?
    >
    > Bob C.
    >
    >
    >
     
  6. >I think
    >that for most of the rest of the world including Canada the term 'American'
    >applies to the USA.


    Certianly this Brit doesn't think of Canadians or Canada as "American"
    Similarly I don't think of Mexico or Mexicans as "Americans". Certainly do
    think the residents of the USA are Americans and that the USA is referred to as
    America.

    Cheers, helen s



    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

    --Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
     
  7. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > question
    > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > americans would.
    > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > American.
    > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > bike
    > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    >
    > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > can't afford car.
    >
    > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > how could find your bike)


    Try visiting the campus of the University of California, at Davis. Finding
    a parking place for your bike is difficult at times. They provide secure
    parking facilities for bikes, have special traffic signals just for bikes,
    and even have a student-funded on campus bike repair facility on campus.

    --
    ~_-*
    ....G/ \G
    http://www.CycliStats.com
    CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  8. di

    di Guest

    "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > question
    > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > americans would.
    > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > American.
    > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > bike
    > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    >
    > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > can't afford car.
    >
    > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > how could find your bike)


    Before becoming very critical of American society, you might try to improve
    your English, it would make your position more credible.
     
  9. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Red Cloud wrote:

    > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > how could find your bike)


    Maybe yours is an urban campus that's not as "bike friendly".

    Different USA campuses are different. Visit Stanford or UC Davis in
    California, and you would be shocked by the number of cyclists. At
    Stanford, the 10-minute period between classes is pure bedlam as the
    cyclists ride from one classroom to another. It would be difficult
    to get between distant classrooms in time without a bike, and using
    a car is out of the question.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  10. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > > question
    > > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > > americans would.
    > > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > > American.
    > > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > > bike
    > > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    > >
    > > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > > can't afford car.
    > >
    > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > how could find your bike)

    >
    > Red Cloud,
    >
    > From your other post on this newsgroup, you obviously live in California.
    > Taking California as representative of all of America is like taking
    > television programming as representative of real life.
    >
    > I wish cycling were more popular here, but it's not as unpopular as you make
    > it out to be. The love affair with the car stems in part from the fact that
    > we have land here. We're not piled on top of each other like in some
    > European countries. And we're allowed to own land here ... unlike in some
    > countries. The distances between our places are more vast. Maybe not where
    > you are in California, but it's true in many other places. We have longer
    > distances to travel and we have a good road system to facilitate it.
    >
    > But some of the largest and most successful bicycle companies are here and
    > we're an important export market for European and Asian bicycle companies.
    > Some of those bikes gather dust in people's garages. Some actually get used
    > ... regularly.
    >
    > I attended a cycling event yesterday in a remote town called Clark's Hill,
    > SC. I don't know what the population is there, but it's VERY small. The
    > event drew from miles around, though and hundreds of people showed up --
    > hundreds of mostly very fit and healthy Americans who love to ride their
    > bikes.
    >
    > Don't judge America by California. Don't call the USA "America," either ...
    > Canadians and Mexicans and others get offended 'cuz they're American's, too.
    >
    > I heard a good one the other day ... how many Frenchmen does it take to
    > defend Paris? Nobody knows ... it's never been done. I guess all Frenchmen
    > are cowards, eh?
    >
    > Bob C.


    How about comparing European city with American city (OK use America not USA)
    regarding the popularity of bicycle?

    Clark's HIll SC bike gathering is just a political show which is very popular
    in America. It's just political show using bicycle. Probably those only rides
    a bike on that show probably never ride a bike as a transporation.

    So your writing is worthless. It's even stupid naive and arrogant which is
    normal to being Americans.
     
  11. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    "AustinMN" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Red Cloud <[email protected]>
    >
    > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > how could find your bike)

    >
    > Note how he suggest he in US. In other thread he call himself American.
    > Note how Yahoo address is .UK.
    >
    > How troll continues because we feed him!
    >
    > Austin



    YOu are right that I'm in aMerica not UK but you are wrong about trolling.
    I'm here to make a point not trolling. I don't even watch TV OK!
    YOu watch American TV, you are feeding to all the trolling TV program.
    That's why I never watch propaganda American TV. I rather watch BBC.
     
  12. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    "SniffinVinyl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Good post, unfortunately this guy looks like a troll. Most of his
    > observations are likely true, but he displays no understanding of why there
    > are differences with Europe, and yet in the same breath is making an implied
    > judgement.
    >


    I feel sad you think I'm trolling. I'm making a point regardign the
    most
    important aspect of bicycle. How could that be trolling?



    > Also, an observation from a Canadian, most of us do not think of ourselves
    > as Americans, perhaps we are better described as North Americans. I think
    > that for most of the rest of the world including Canada the term 'American'
    > applies to the USA.
    >


    I myself quite surprise Canadian perception regarding their
    relathionship
    with American. It seems to me Canadian, if not the most
    anti-American, is very
    anti-american. Is not true that Canadian try to get close to EU's
    socialism than Bush-American neo-nazism?



    > Sniffinvinyl
    >






    >
    >
    > "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > > > question
    > > > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > > > americans would.
    > > > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > > > American.
    > > > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > > > bike
    > > > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    > > >
    > > > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > > > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > > > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > > > can't afford car.
    > > >
    > > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > > how could find your bike)

    > >
    > > Red Cloud,
    > >
    > > From your other post on this newsgroup, you obviously live in California.
    > > Taking California as representative of all of America is like taking
    > > television programming as representative of real life.
    > >
    > > I wish cycling were more popular here, but it's not as unpopular as you

    > make
    > > it out to be. The love affair with the car stems in part from the fact

    > that
    > > we have land here. We're not piled on top of each other like in some
    > > European countries. And we're allowed to own land here ... unlike in some
    > > countries. The distances between our places are more vast. Maybe not

    > where
    > > you are in California, but it's true in many other places. We have longer
    > > distances to travel and we have a good road system to facilitate it.
    > >
    > > But some of the largest and most successful bicycle companies are here and
    > > we're an important export market for European and Asian bicycle companies.
    > > Some of those bikes gather dust in people's garages. Some actually get

    > used
    > > ... regularly.
    > >
    > > I attended a cycling event yesterday in a remote town called Clark's Hill,
    > > SC. I don't know what the population is there, but it's VERY small. The
    > > event drew from miles around, though and hundreds of people showed up --
    > > hundreds of mostly very fit and healthy Americans who love to ride their
    > > bikes.
    > >
    > > Don't judge America by California. Don't call the USA "America," either

    > ...
    > > Canadians and Mexicans and others get offended 'cuz they're American's,

    > too.
    > >
    > > I heard a good one the other day ... how many Frenchmen does it take to
    > > defend Paris? Nobody knows ... it's never been done. I guess all

    > Frenchmen
    > > are cowards, eh?
    > >
    > > Bob C.
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
  13. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > > question
    > > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > > americans would.
    > > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > > American.
    > > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > > bike
    > > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    > >
    > > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > > can't afford car.
    > >
    > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > how could find your bike)

    >
    > Try visiting the campus of the University of California, at Davis. Finding
    > a parking place for your bike is difficult at times. They provide secure
    > parking facilities for bikes, have special traffic signals just for bikes,
    > and even have a student-funded on campus bike repair facility on campus.



    HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    much bike in CSU Los angeles?
     
  14. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > To talk about the topic of Bicycle to Americans, it's like asking a
    > > > question
    > > > to aliens. Aliens from out of space would not ride a bike like
    > > > americans would.
    > > > Bicycle is like a sort of unnecessarily and unfriendly item to most
    > > > American.
    > > > And is not part of American lives. Americans don't much care about
    > > > bike
    > > > when they are addicted to clean their automobile.
    > > >
    > > > For American, bike is just a recreational sport not as a
    > > > transportation machine. That all that is. Most Probably only 2% or 3%
    > > > American riding a bike everyday. Most of them are poor underclass who
    > > > can't afford car.
    > > >
    > > > I go to any American college and count how many bike I see parked in
    > > > bike-rack? One or two. Here in my city in a local college, to count
    > > > the number of bikes inside of campus, the number is less than 20 or
    > > > less. I will never see here in American campus the tremendous number
    > > > of bikes parked in English campus like Cambridge or Oxford (I wonder
    > > > how could find your bike)

    > >
    > > Try visiting the campus of the University of California, at Davis.

    Finding
    > > a parking place for your bike is difficult at times. They provide

    secure
    > > parking facilities for bikes, have special traffic signals just for

    bikes,
    > > and even have a student-funded on campus bike repair facility on campus.

    >
    >
    > HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    > much bike in CSU Los angeles?


    I don't know about LA, but UC Davis has THOUSANDS of bikes on campus every
    day. So does CSU Chico.

    GG
     
  15. On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 23:19:13 -0700, "GaryG"
    <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote:

    >I don't know about LA, but UC Davis has THOUSANDS of bikes on campus every
    >day. So does CSU Chico.
    >
    >GG


    He has trouble seeing them from that .UK address that someone else
    mentioned.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  16. Bob

    Bob Guest

    > HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    > much bike in CSU Los angeles?


    Do you see much grammar at CSULA?
     
  17. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Bob wrote:

    >> HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    >> much bike in CSU Los angeles?

    >
    > Do you see much grammar at CSULA?


    He would in my friend Ivan's class (ESL) -- a popular one at CSULA.

    Matt O.
     
  18. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Red Cloud wrote:

    > HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    > much bike in CSU Los angeles?


    The City of Davis is reported to have about 50,000 bicycles, roughly
    one bicycle per person. Some 20% of trips in Davis are made by
    bicycle.
    http://www.bikeleague.org/mediacenter/medprs22.htm

    And here's my town, not quite as impressive, but still pretty good:

    "In Palo Alto, remarkable 4.4% of all trips are by bicycle. Palo
    Alto encourages city employees to bike to work by offering them a
    $20 monthly stipend. The city supports a Bikestation, a staffed bike
    parking facility that serves some 50 cyclists per day, and provides
    bike lockers at transit hubs and in its business district. Palo Alto
    schools have a part-time coordinator who teaches a bicycle
    curriculum to children in the third, fifth and sixth grades. Younger
    children are introduced to traffic and helmet safety in a Safe Moves
    program."
    http://www.bikeleague.org/mediacenter/medprs051503.htm

    Los Angeles is the worst example of American car culture. But Los
    Angeles does not equal California, and it really does not equal the
    USA.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  19. Red Cloud

    Red Cloud Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Red Cloud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]


    > bikes,
    > > > and even have a student-funded on campus bike repair facility on campus.

    > >
    > >
    > > HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    > > much bike in CSU Los angeles?

    >
    > I don't know about LA, but UC Davis has THOUSANDS of bikes on campus every
    > day. So does CSU Chico.
    >
    > GG



    Hardly believe UC David has a thousand bike, but CSULA, CSULB, CSUF,
    CSU Domingze Hill has no much biker. I saw more skateboard rider than
    Bike rider.
    Defintely bike is not popular around here.
     
  20. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Terry Morse wrote:

    > Red Cloud wrote:
    >
    >> HOw many bike you see in Northern CA CSU Davis CAmpus? I don't see
    >> much bike in CSU Los angeles?

    >
    > The City of Davis is reported to have about 50,000 bicycles, roughly
    > one bicycle per person. Some 20% of trips in Davis are made by
    > bicycle.
    > http://www.bikeleague.org/mediacenter/medprs22.htm
    >
    > And here's my town, not quite as impressive, but still pretty good:
    >
    > "In Palo Alto, remarkable 4.4% of all trips are by bicycle. Palo
    > Alto encourages city employees to bike to work by offering them a
    > $20 monthly stipend.


    This is terrific, but I can't imagine $20 makes a difference to anyone who can
    afford to live in Palo Alto! However, many people, including myself, view being
    able to bike to work, etc., as a luxury. Real estate prices for villagey towns
    like Palo Alto suggest that many people feel this way, and are willing to pay
    for it. It's the less-well-off and the suckered who must put up with
    car-dependence.

    > Los Angeles is the worst example of American car culture. But Los
    > Angeles does not equal California, and it really does not equal the
    > USA.


    Despite stereotypes, Los Angeles is *far* from being the worst example of
    American car culture. It isn't even close to being the worst in CA. Nearby
    Orange and Riverside counties are far worse, as is the sprawl extending eastward
    and southward from the Bay Area. LA has distinct neighborhoods with everything
    close by, public transportation that works better than spoiled upper middle
    class white people give it credit for, plus the city is far more bikeable than
    one might imagine. The sub-cities of Santa Monica, Pasadena, Glendale, and Long
    Beach are all highly centralized, walkable, and bikeable. Long Beach even has a
    Bikestation.

    And again, despite stereotypes, CA has nowhere near the worst sprawl in the
    country. Newer areas of the Southeast are far worse. If you want to see
    sprawl-hell, go to Washington or Atlanta! Charlotte, Greensboro-High Point, and
    Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill aren't far behind. Notice the hyphens! What does
    that tell you? Hyphenless Charlotte has a lovely downtown, with great,
    affordable neighborhoods, but most Charlotteans live on the outskirts where they
    can enjoy their love affairs with ride-on mowers.

    And then there's Texas...

    Matt O.
     
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