biscuits and gravy?????

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Paula, Mar 26, 2004.

  1. Paula

    Paula Guest

    o.k. so here is another question for the American readers.I
    have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits and gravy."
    As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e. ginger, hob
    nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the brown stuff
    made with meat stock, you can imagine the horrible
    picture it presents.Now i know that your equivalent to
    our biscuits are called cookies so what exactly are
    YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please enlighten.
     
    Tags:


  2. "We" make biscuits with flour, salt, shortening, baking
    powder and milk. Same basic ingredients for buttermilk or
    sour dough biscuits. The gravy used is usually a milk gravy
    made from pan drippings in which sausage, ham, chicken or
    bacon has been cooked.

    Paul

    "paula" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.
     
  3. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "paula" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.

    Sure - here make some: There are abour a few thousand
    recipes but this is as good as any.

    Dimitri

    BISCUITS AND GRAVY

    BISCUITS: 2 c. sifted all-purpose flour 1 tbsp. sugar 4 tsp.
    baking powder
    1/2 tsp. salt
    2/2 c. shortening 1 beaten egg
    3/3 c. milk Sift together dry ingredients; cut in shortening
    until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Combine egg and
    milk; add to flour mixture all at once. Stir until dough
    follows fork around bowl. Turn out on lightly floured
    surface; knead gently with heel of hand about 20 strokes.
    Roll dough to 3/4 inch thickness. Dip 2 inch biscuit
    cutter in flour; cut straight down through dough - no
    twisting. Place on ungreased baking sheet (3/4 inch apart
    for crusty biscuits, close together for soft sides). If
    desired, chill 1-3 hours. Bake in a very hot oven (450
    degrees) 10-14 minutes or until golden brown.

    SAUSAGE GRAVY:
    4/2 lb. bulk sausage 4 tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 1/2 c. milk
    Salt and pepper to taste Cook sausage, crumbling well.
    Pour off all but 2-3 tablespoons of grease. Sprinkle flour
    on top. Increase heat to high and cook, stirring, until
    flour starts to brown. Add milk, stirring constantly and
    continue cooking until gravy thickens. Add salt and
    pepper. Serve over hot biscuits or toast.
     
  4. [email protected] (paula) writes:

    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.

    Here's the basic recipe I use,

    Biscuits:

    2 cups flour
    1/2 tsp salt
    2.5 tsp baking powder 1 tbsp sugar
    3/2 cup shortening
    4/3 cup buttermilk

    Heat oven to 450. Mix dry ingredients in a mixing bowl. Mix
    in the shortening until you get a mixture of pea-sized
    chunks. Add the buttermilk and stir until it barely forms a
    ball---it will still be clumpy. Dump the dough out on a
    floured board and roll to 1/2" thick, and cut out round
    biscuits around 4" in diameter. Bake biscuits on a greased
    sheet until brown, around 12 minute.

    Gravy:

    5/2 lb bulk breakfast sausage (like a Jimmy Dean chub) 1
    small onion, minced 6 tbsp flour
    6.5 cups milk
    7/2 cup cold coffee Lots of black pepper

    Fry up the sausage until it's getting crispy. Add the onion
    and cook until the onion is translucent. Drain off most of
    the fat. Add the flour and cook until the flour starts to
    toast. Add the milk and coffee, and stir (scraping the
    crunchy bits off the bottom) until it's a thick gravy. Add
    pepper. Serve over biscuits.

    --
    Richard W Kaszeta [email protected]
    http://www.kaszeta.org/rich
     
  5. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    >o.k. so here is another question for the American readers.I
    > have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits and gravy."
    > As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e. ginger, hob
    > nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the brown stuff
    > made with meat stock, you can imagine the horrible
    > picture it presents.Now i know that your equivalent to
    > our biscuits are called cookies so what exactly are
    > YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please enlighten.
    =======================
    Biscuits are a simple hot bread cut into individual rounds.
    They are most often eaten with butter and honey, or jam. I
    often hear of biscuits and gravy, but have never eaten them
    that way. here are two typical recipes:

    Title: Biscuits Categories: Yield: 1 Batch

    2 c Flour 4 ts Baking powder 3 tb Butter
    1/2 ts Salt
    2/4 c Milk

    Mix dry ingredients and butter with 2 knives as for
    pastry. Add milk and mix. Roll out an inch thick. Cut in
    rounds, brush over tops with melted butter. Bake about 15
    minutes in a 350 degree oven.
    --------------------------------------------------
    and here's another similar one: Basic Biscuits Recipe

    2 cups flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 2
    tablespoons shortening
    3/4 cup liquid (all milk or half milk and half water)

    Mix dry ingredients and sift twice. Work in fat with tips of
    the fingers, or cut in with two knives. Add the liquid
    gradually, mixing with a knife in a soft dough. Owing to
    differences in flours, it is impossible to determine the
    exact amount of liquid. Toss on a floured board, pat and
    roll lightly to one-half inch in thickness. Shape with a
    biscuit cutter. Bake in hot oven (450-460 degrees F.) twelve
    to fifteen minutes.
     
  6. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    paula wrote:

    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.

    I think our bisquits are closer to plain scones - with milk
    or sausage gravy (and *pepper* in the gravy!). Edrena
     
  7. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dimitri wrote:
    > "paula" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> o.k. so here is another question for the American
    >> readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    >> and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    >> ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is
    >> the brown stuff made with meat stock, you can
    >> imagine the horrible picture it presents.Now i know
    >> that your equivalent to our biscuits are called
    >> cookies so what exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and
    >> gravy.Please enlighten.
    >
    > Sure - here make some: There are abour a few thousand
    > recipes but this is as good as any.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    > BISCUITS AND GRAVY
    >
    > SAUSAGE GRAVY:
    > 1/2 lb. bulk sausage

    Might need to clarify what (in the U.S.) bulk sausage is,
    for this purpose, anyway. It's ground pork sausage generally
    seasoned with pepper and sage. Usually served for breakfast.
    The term 'bulk' means it's not been stuffed into casings
    like bangers. :)

    Jill
     
  8. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    paula wrote:
    >
    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.

    Think more in terms of scones, but the scones have a
    softer texture than real scones. The gravy is white rather
    than brown.
     
  9. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-03-26, paula <[email protected]> wrote:

    > mentioned a few times" biscuits and gravy." As our
    > biscuits are usually sweet i.e. ginger, hob nobs,
    > chocolate etc. and our gravy is the brown stuff made with
    > meat stock...

    Here, in the US, what you call biscuits are what we call
    cookies. Sweet and sugary pastry-like baked goods. Our
    "biscuit" is more like a scone, but with leaveners and more
    fat. Our biscuit-type gravy is usually based on a "white"
    meat like pork, or chicken. Also, the liquid in the gravy is
    typically milk instead of stock. Imagine a light and fluffy
    bread-like scone topped with a bechamel style meat gravy.

    Don't feel bad about the confusion. We Americans are still
    trying to figure out what the heck Brits mean by
    "pudding". :)

    nb
     
  10. Levelwave©

    Levelwave© Guest

    notbob wrote:

    > Here, in the US, what you call biscuits are what we call
    > cookies. Sweet and sugary pastry-like baked goods. Our
    > "biscuit" is more like a scone, but with leaveners and
    > more fat. Our biscuit-type gravy is usually based on a
    > "white" meat like pork, or chicken.

    err... Chicken?

    ~john
     
  11. Dimiri

    Dimiri Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Dimitri wrote:
    > > "paula" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > >> readers.I have seen mentioned a few times"
    > >> biscuits and gravy." As our biscuits are usually
    > >> sweet i.e. ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and
    > >> our gravy is the brown stuff made with meat stock,
    > >> you can imagine the horrible picture it
    > >> presents.Now i know that your equivalent to our
    > >> biscuits are called cookies so what exactly are
    > >> YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please enlighten.
    > >
    > > Sure - here make some: There are abour a few thousand
    > > recipes but this is as good as any.
    > >
    > > Dimitri
    > >
    > > BISCUITS AND GRAVY
    > >
    > > SAUSAGE GRAVY:
    > > 1/2 lb. bulk sausage
    >
    > Might need to clarify what (in the U.S.) bulk sausage is,
    > for this
    purpose,
    > anyway. It's ground pork sausage generally seasoned with
    > pepper and sage. Usually served for breakfast. The term
    > 'bulk' means it's not been stuffed into casings like
    > bangers. :)
    >
    > Jill

    Right on . Good call.

    Dimitri
     
  12. Connieg999

    Connieg999 Guest

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> writes:

    >knead gently with heel of hand about 20 strokes.

    Dimitri, as right as you almost *always* are, this time
    you're wrong. Biscuits should NEVER be kneaded. The dough
    should be turned out of the bowl, patted down, and cut. They
    will be much lighter than if kneaded.

    (Okay, now everybody disagree with me! LOL!)

    Connie
    *****************************************************
    My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.
     
  13. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    ConnieG999 wrote:
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> knead gently with heel of hand about 20 strokes.
    >
    > Dimitri, as right as you almost *always* are, this time
    > you're wrong. Biscuits should NEVER be kneaded. The dough
    > should be turned out of the bowl, patted down, and cut.
    > They will be much lighter than if kneaded.
    >
    > (Okay, now everybody disagree with me! LOL!)
    >
    > Connie
    > *****************************************************
    > My mind is like a steel...um, whatchamacallit.

    Connie, you are correct. Handle the dough as little as
    possible, otherwise they tend to be tough.

    Jill
     
  14. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (paula) wrote:

    > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is the
    > brown stuff made with meat stock, you can imagine the
    > horrible picture it presents.Now i know that your
    > equivalent to our biscuits are called cookies so what
    > exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and gravy.Please
    > enlighten.

    Quick bread, cut in small round shapes 3 to 5" across,
    split, butttered and slathered in meat based gravy. No sugar
    or anything.

    Plain buscuits are also good with butter and honey. ;-d.

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    "There are many intelligent species in the universe, and
    they are all owned by cats! -- Asimov

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
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    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  15. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s04>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2004-03-26, paula <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > mentioned a few times" biscuits and gravy." As our
    > > biscuits are usually sweet i.e. ginger, hob nobs,
    > > chocolate etc. and our gravy is the brown stuff made
    > > with meat stock...
    >
    > Here, in the US, what you call biscuits are what we call
    > cookies. Sweet and sugary pastry-like baked goods. Our
    > "biscuit" is more like a scone, but with leaveners and
    > more fat. Our biscuit-type gravy is usually based on a
    > "white" meat like pork, or chicken. Also, the liquid in
    > the gravy is typically milk instead of stock. Imagine a
    > light and fluffy bread-like scone topped with a bechamel
    > style meat gravy.
    >
    > Don't feel bad about the confusion. We Americans are still
    > trying to figure out what the heck Brits mean by
    > "pudding". :)
    >
    > nb

    Or spotted dick...... ;-D

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    "There are many intelligent species in the universe, and
    they are all owned by cats! -- Asimov

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  16. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Levelwave(C) <[email protected]> wrote:

    > notbob wrote:
    >
    > > Here, in the US, what you call biscuits are what we call
    > > cookies. Sweet and sugary pastry-like baked goods. Our
    > > "biscuit" is more like a scone, but with leaveners and
    > > more fat. Our biscuit-type gravy is usually based on a
    > > "white" meat like pork, or chicken.
    >
    >
    > err... Chicken?
    >
    > ~john
    >

    What??? Have you never made a pan of pan fried chicken and
    used the gravy on buscuits? :)

    Good stuff, especially if you spice the chicken like I do,
    and don't bread it!

    Yum!

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    "There are many intelligent species in the universe, and
    they are all owned by cats! -- Asimov

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  17. Levelwave

    Levelwave Guest

    Katra wrote:

    > What??? Have you never made a pan of pan fried chicken and
    > used the gravy on buscuits? :)

    Well... No. No I haven't. And I'm from Tennessee! I honestly
    didn't think chicken fat offered much flavor...

    err... Unbreaded Fried Chicken? WTF? :)

    ~john
     
  18. "Arri London" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > paula wrote:
    > >
    > > o.k. so here is another question for the American
    > > readers.I have seen mentioned a few times" biscuits
    > > and gravy." As our biscuits are usually sweet i.e.
    > > ginger, hob nobs, chocolate etc. and our gravy is
    > > the brown stuff made with meat stock, you can
    > > imagine the horrible picture it presents.Now i know
    > > that your equivalent to our biscuits are called
    > > cookies so what exactly are YOUR'E biscuits and
    > > gravy.Please enlighten.
    >
    > Think more in terms of scones, but the scones have a
    > softer texture than real scones. The gravy is white rather
    > than brown.

    The closest thing I know to US biscuits is the type of
    scones used on top of a stew. They are used as US dumplings
    are used. But if baked instead of used as a stew topping,
    they would be very close.

    Charlie
     
  19. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Levelwave <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Katra wrote:
    >
    > > What??? Have you never made a pan of pan fried chicken
    > > and used the gravy on buscuits? :)
    >
    >
    > Well... No. No I haven't. And I'm from Tennessee! I
    > honestly didn't think chicken fat offered much flavor...
    >
    > err... Unbreaded Fried Chicken? WTF? :)
    >
    > ~john

    <lol> Okay, this is how mom taught me to "fry" chicken.

    Take whole chicken, cut it up, lay it in a clean dry cast
    iron skillet. There is enough fat under the skin of a
    chicken that it'll cook out and provide plenty of fat for
    cooking. Basically, I cook it in it's own fat...

    I spice the top with Onion and garlic powder, lemon pepper
    and fresh rosemary, and maybe a bit of fresh minced sage and
    basil, (I have a live herb garden) and cover it with a
    spatter lid. Cook on medium heat for about 20 minutes. Take
    a pair of tongs, turn the chicken and add more of the same
    spices, fry for about another 20 minutes.

    Take it out and drain it in a bowl lined with paper towels.

    In the pan is some delightful chicken fat, drippings and
    spices, and a few crunchies. To that I add a bit of water
    and heavy cream and scrape the pan well with a spatula until
    the mix begins to simmer, then I take some arrowroot (or
    corn starch) and mix it with a bit of cold water, then pour
    that slowly into the mix. Stir until thick then remove it
    from the heat.

    You can use flour if you prefer. Any of the three works fine
    as a thickener.

    Pour over split biscuits or smashed 'taters. ;-)

    Nope! No breading on my chicken. Lower fat and calories, so
    you get to have the calories in the cream you add to the
    gravy instead. <G>

    You can use a similar (gravy) technique for chicken gravy
    from a roasted chicken, and that has even more flavor.

    If I don't want the gravy, I just add a bit of water to the
    pan to deglaze it, then dump it on the dog's kibbles. They
    love it! I seldom eat any kind of bread as I have a wheat
    sensitivity. <sigh> But I do remember when.......

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    "There are many intelligent species in the universe, and
    they are all owned by cats! -- Asimov

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  20. Paula

    Paula Guest

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s04>...
    > On 2004-03-26, paula <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > mentioned a few times" biscuits and gravy." As our
    > > biscuits are usually sweet i.e. ginger, hob nobs,
    > > chocolate etc. and our gravy is the brown stuff made
    > > with meat stock...
    >
    > Here, in the US, what you call biscuits are what we call
    > cookies. Sweet and sugary pastry-like baked goods. Our
    > "biscuit" is more like a scone, but with leaveners and
    > more fat. Our biscuit-type gravy is usually based on a
    > "white" meat like pork, or chicken. Also, the liquid in
    > the gravy is typically milk instead of stock. Imagine a
    > light and fluffy bread-like scone topped with a bechamel
    > style meat gravy.
    >
    > Don't feel bad about the confusion. We Americans are still
    > trying to figure out what the heck Brits mean by
    > "pudding". :)
    >
    > nb

    i certainly do not feel bad about not knowing what an
    american term is .As for our pudding it usually refers to a
    hot desert like bread and butter pudding, spotted dick, eves
    pudding, jam roly poly etc. Then of course there are the
    savoury type of puddings like baked suet pudding (used
    instead of dumplings in the stew --this is baked seperatly
    and is nice and crispy) and of course our Yorkshire pudding.
     
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