Chain-Teeth wear on 70's bikes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Yoseph Irving, Apr 20, 2003.

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  1. Greets,

    I've got an old Fuji "Sports 10" and a Peugot 10 speed, I bought the Fuji used about 10 years ago.
    There was a skip (don't know the tech name for this) in the chain in high gear, periodically. I told
    the shop about it and they changed out the rear sprocket which mostely fixed the problem until it
    gradually reemerged. In the last couple years I rode it winter through snow, slush, and salt. Anyway
    it's at the stage where It can't handle the pressure of a moderate grade, the chain slips many teeth
    and often flies off.

    Now the Peugot has seen little use and I was comparing the chain wheels. The old Fuji's teeth come
    to a point and I think this must be extreme wear. Is this the heart of the problem, other than the
    old chain and my habit of climbing hills in higher gears?

    I read somewhere that one should replace both chain and sprocket. Should I be replacing chain,
    chainwheel, and rear sprocket (Whole wheel I guess)?

    (I think I see now that I should write off the Fuji). The only thing that kept me off of the Peugot
    today was the fact that a pedal died and I need a vise or something to get the pedal off.) ((I was
    going to trade cottered cranks today, but the Fuji chainwheel with the pointy teeth looked wasted.))

    BTW, I like these old bikes, I grew up on them. Had an Azuza Apachie, Gitane, Later a Takara...
    Takara fork died when a friend rode it into a curb... Gitane fork died when I rode it into a car...

    Any thoughts or pointers appreciated,

    Son of a Centurion... I got the legs but not the brain... Y
     
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  2. Change both the chain and the cogs. the smallest ones at the very least. The reason your skip
    reapeared is because a worn chain "stretches", that is, wear in the individual pieces cause the
    links to spread apart slightly.

    This causes the new cog, which doesn't quit fit as well as a result, to wear out faster.

    You shouldn't have to worry about the front sprockets, unless they show an unduly amount of wear as
    well Check em, though, just to be sure.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  3. On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:49:43 +0000, Yoseph Irving wrote:

    > handle the pressure of a moderate grade, the chain slips many teeth and often flies off.

    Flies off the chainring?

    >
    > Now the Peugot has seen little use and I was comparing the chain wheels. The old Fuji's teeth come
    > to a point and I think this must be extreme wear.

    Yes

    > Is this the heart of the problem, other than the old chain and my habit of climbing hills in
    >higher gears?

    Yes, it is. You should also replace the chain, since you have likely been riding on it well after it
    was worn out.
    >
    > I read somewhere that one should replace both chain and sprocket. Should I be replacing chain,
    > chainwheel, and rear sprocket (Whole wheel I guess)?

    Oh, boy. If you replace your chain regularly when it gets worn, then sprockets and chainrings will
    last quite a while. If you ride the chain well past its useful life, it will quickly wear out the
    cogs in back, and (more slowly) wear out the chainrings, too.

    Since you probably rode the thing well past when the chain should have been replaced, I suggest you
    replace the chain, the chainrings, and the freewheel/cassette as well. No reason to replace the rear
    wheel. The cogs come off. Since it is an older bike, it might have a freewheel, which is harder, but
    not impossible, to remove than a modern cassette.
    >
    > (I think I see now that I should write off the Fuji).

    Not at all. It's probably a better bike than the Peugeot.

    The only thing
    > that kept me off of the Peugot today was the fact that a pedal died and I need a vise or something
    > to get the pedal off.)

    No, you need a pedal wrench. Careful, though, the left one has left-hand thread.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems. _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. Hi, and thanks for all the usefull info.

    David L. Johnson wrote:

    >On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:49:43 +0000, Yoseph Irving wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>handle the pressure of a moderate grade, the chain slips many teeth and often flies off.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Flies off the chainring?
    >
    >
    >
    Correct. REAL hard on the Gonads... inspired me to do a little research, as you see.

    >
    >
    >>(I think I see now that I should write off the Fuji).
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Not at all. It's probably a better bike than the Peugeot.
    >
    >
    >
    Actually I do like the feel of the Fuji frame better, i'm sure it's a touring frame. I'm not sure
    about the Peugot.

    >The only thing
    >
    >
    >>that kept me off of the Peugot today was the fact that a pedal died and I need a vise or something
    >>to get the pedal off.)
    >>
    >>
    >
    >No, you need a pedal wrench. Careful, though, the left one has left-hand thread.
    >

    I managed to do it today with a monkey wrench, slightly large, and WD-40.

    Thanks again, I'll use the Peugot this year and perhaps move the necessary parts over to the Fuji,
    even though it's got ugly paint. And I'll replace the chain when It starts skipping.

    peace, Y
     
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