Cold belly after riding???



A

amakyonin

Guest
On Jan 7, 7:52 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> I originally thought it had to do with a layer of fat (although I'm
> not very fat).  But one of the places I measured for direct comparison
> was my sides, AKA "love handles."
>
> There's quite a bit more fat there than on my belly, yet the
> temperature there is higher.


The fatty skin on the sides has less air blowing across it than your
belly. If you ride with any lean forward, much of the air hitting your
upper chest is diverted down to the crease of your hips. The sides
just get the normal airflow streaming off your body. I've noticed the
same phenomenon at colder temperatures where I can still ride with a
jersey untucked. The cold air blows in and cools that area more than
anywhere else. I've found that bib shorts help immensely in keeping
this part warm in colder weather.
 
P

Patrick Lamb

Guest
On Mon, 7 Jan 2008 14:44:36 -0800 (PST), [email protected] wrote:
>When I get in after a ride, my belly is cold. Specifically, the skin
>at the center of my abdomen, roughly a 6" diameter circle at and below
>my solar plexus, feels cold to the touch. My wife confirms that it
>feels cold, and we've noticed this for years. It doesn't seem to
>happen to her belly.
>
>Just now, after a short (17 mile) ride, I took out my new toy, an
>infra-red surface thermometer. Checking my skin temperatures at my
>quadriceps, my sides, my neck and my forehead all gave readings within
>a degree of 83 degrees F. But my belly was 72.8 F. I was riding in a
>thin long sleeved jersey and tights. It was about 65 degrees F
>outside.
>
>Anybody know what gives?


Well, none of the other theories really make sense to me, so I'll
invent a new one.

I suspect the position of your belly is such that the jersey lies flat
against that spot, and so you have no insulating air space right
there. You've probably got enough air flowing through the jersey to
evaporate a disproportional (relative to the rest of your abdomen)
amount of sweat from that area, leading to excess cooling.
Alternatively, the sweat conducts heat through the jersey to the
surface, and it's evaporated there.

I notice something similar under a couple of conditions; either cool
with no wind jacket, or a good bit colder with a jacket, when I don't
control moisture well and end up with a good sweat. Doesn't happen
when it's really cold, and I have an extra pile layer between jersey
and jacket, IME.

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
B

Bill Marsh

Guest
"Patrick Lamb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Mon, 7 Jan 2008 14:44:36 -0800 (PST), [email protected] wrote:
>>When I get in after a ride, my belly is cold. Specifically, the skin
>>at the center of my abdomen, roughly a 6" diameter circle at and below
>>my solar plexus, feels cold to the touch. My wife confirms that it
>>feels cold, and we've noticed this for years. It doesn't seem to
>>happen to her belly.
>>
>>Just now, after a short (17 mile) ride, I took out my new toy, an
>>infra-red surface thermometer. Checking my skin temperatures at my
>>quadriceps, my sides, my neck and my forehead all gave readings within
>>a degree of 83 degrees F. But my belly was 72.8 F. I was riding in a
>>thin long sleeved jersey and tights. It was about 65 degrees F
>>outside.
>>
>>Anybody know what gives?

>
> Well, none of the other theories really make sense to me, so I'll
> invent a new one.
>
> I suspect the position of your belly is such that the jersey lies flat
> against that spot, and so you have no insulating air space right
> there. You've probably got enough air flowing through the jersey to
> evaporate a disproportional (relative to the rest of your abdomen)
> amount of sweat from that area, leading to excess cooling.
> Alternatively, the sweat conducts heat through the jersey to the
> surface, and it's evaporated there.
>
> I notice something similar under a couple of conditions; either cool
> with no wind jacket, or a good bit colder with a jacket, when I don't
> control moisture well and end up with a good sweat. Doesn't happen
> when it's really cold, and I have an extra pile layer between jersey
> and jacket, IME.
>
> Pat
>
> Email address works as is.

And unless you have six pack Abs there is more fat on your belly then most
of the rest of your body and it does not circulate blood as well. Us older
folks have that even when I work out in the gym. Bill
 
I

ilaboo

Guest
:
>
> When I get in after a ride, my belly is cold. Specifically, the skin
> at the center of my abdomen, roughly a 6" diameter circle at and below
> my solar plexus, feels cold to the touch.


how old are you?--sounds like a vascular problem.

i suggest a good physical exam as it could be an indication of other
problems

hth
pter
 
C

Camilo

Guest
On Jan 7, 3:52 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> On Jan 7, 7:34 pm, [email protected] wrote:
>
> > Could this be the path to renewed research cold fusion? :)

>
> > Suspect it's a combination of fat insulation that part of the skin
> > from body heat combined with the cooling effect of sweat evaporating.

>
> I originally thought it had to do with a layer of fat (although I'm
> not very fat). But one of the places I measured for direct comparison
> was my sides, AKA "love handles."
>
> There's quite a bit more fat there than on my belly, yet the
> temperature there is higher.
>
> Oh, and Jay: I'm not worried about it at all. Just curious.
>
> - Frank Krygowski


Your love handles aren't exposed to the wind like your belly.

It's pretty common knowledge (around here at least) that fat on the
belly for guys and on the ass for women gets cold when xc skiing. I
doubt if the ass would get that cold cycling since it's not really out
there in the wind, but my wife doesn't cycle in the winter so we dont
have direct experience.
 
S

still just me

Guest
On Wed, 16 Jan 2008 16:06:55 -0800 (PST), Camilo
<[email protected]> wrote:


>It's pretty common knowledge (around here at least) that fat on the
>belly for guys and on the ass for women gets cold when xc skiing. I
>doubt if the ass would get that cold cycling since it's not really out
>there in the wind, but my wife doesn't cycle in the winter so we dont
>have direct experience.



Perhaps you should run some scientific experiments with your wife
riding to resolve this?

:)
 
P

Paul M. Hobson

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Maybe this belongs in rec.bicycles.anatomical.weirdness instead. But:
>
> When I get in after a ride, my belly is cold. Specifically, the skin
> at the center of my abdomen, roughly a 6" diameter circle at and below
> my solar plexus, feels cold to the touch. My wife confirms that it
> feels cold, and we've noticed this for years. It doesn't seem to
> happen to her belly.
>
> Just now, after a short (17 mile) ride, I took out my new toy, an
> infra-red surface thermometer. Checking my skin temperatures at my
> quadriceps, my sides, my neck and my forehead all gave readings within
> a degree of 83 degrees F. But my belly was 72.8 F. I was riding in a
> thin long sleeved jersey and tights. It was about 65 degrees F
> outside.
>
> Anybody know what gives?
>
> - Frank Krygowski


Frank,

I got home about 10 minutes ago and my belly is still cold.

Who knows?

\\paul
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Paul M. Hobson wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>> Maybe this belongs in rec.bicycles.anatomical.weirdness instead. But:
>>
>> When I get in after a ride, my belly is cold. Specifically, the skin
>> at the center of my abdomen, roughly a 6" diameter circle at and below
>> my solar plexus, feels cold to the touch. My wife confirms that it
>> feels cold, and we've noticed this for years. It doesn't seem to
>> happen to her belly.
>>
>> Just now, after a short (17 mile) ride, I took out my new toy, an
>> infra-red surface thermometer. Checking my skin temperatures at my
>> quadriceps, my sides, my neck and my forehead all gave readings within
>> a degree of 83 degrees F. But my belly was 72.8 F. I was riding in a
>> thin long sleeved jersey and tights. It was about 65 degrees F
>> outside.
>>
>> Anybody know what gives?
>>
>> - Frank Krygowski

>
> Frank,
>
> I got home about 10 minutes ago and my belly is still cold.
>

Ain't no cold in Georgia!

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth
 
P

Paul M. Hobson

Guest
> Paul M. Hobson wrote:
>> Frank,
>>
>> I got home about 10 minutes ago and my belly is still cold.


Tom Sherman wrote:
> Ain't no cold in Georgia!
>


I didn't say it was. FWIW, it'll be -7 deg. C tonight.

HTH,
\\paul
 
S

still just me

Guest
On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 20:27:06 -0500, "Paul M. Hobson"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I didn't say it was. FWIW, it'll be -7 deg. C tonight.
>
>HTH,
>\\paul


What's that in real degrees?
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
still just me wrote:
> On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 20:27:06 -0500, "Paul M. Hobson"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> I didn't say it was. FWIW, it'll be -7 deg. C tonight.
>>

>
> What's that in real degrees?
>

266 kelvin.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth
 
H

Hank

Guest
On Jan 20, 8:00 pm, still just me <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 20:27:06 -0500, "Paul M. Hobson"
>
> <[email protected]> wrote:
> >I didn't say it was.  FWIW, it'll be -7 deg. C tonight.

>
> >HTH,
> >\\paul

>
> What's that in real degrees?


19.4F