DOUBLE TIRE GRIP REDUCE ROLLING FRICTION

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by G.Daniels, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    Tubular tires are expensive so it is wise to take measures which will occasionally help lengthen
    their life span. One helpful procedure is to give the sidewalls a cleaning with a sof t brush and
    soap water then apply liquid latex(LBS).this milky solution protects the sidewall fabric from uh
    moisture dirt road chemicals, ect. New tires come with a coating but it quickly dissappears once
    they are ridden .

    OVER IN EUROPE, a top racing cyclist may have dozens of tubulars down in his basement, stored away
    like a good wine or you name it until the passage of time brings them to full maturity-"I will ride
    no tire before its time" Orson Wells might say. Really! The reason is that the rubber of a newly
    manufactured tire is definitely softer and more prone to punctures and wear than aged rubber. TWO
    TO THREE YEARS is considered ideal, which means that smart riders will want to buy their tires many
    months in advance of when they intend to use them. Until then! The tires are stored in cool
    darkness, lightly inflated on old rims(cheap) or hung loosely over larch rods. Once aged, the
    rubber will show no mark when pressed with a thumbnail, nor will it act like an e racer and give up
    little particles when it is rubbed."green tires" will do both, and they will puncture more easily
    because they tend to pick up and hold road debris, letting it work through the tread. Certainly all
    quality non-vulcanized cotton tubulars and all racing tubulars constructed on a silk casing should
    be aged. Such tires can cost up to $50 apiece(l984), and to ride them green is like throwing money
    away. I remember…

    Many tubulars in the moderate price range, for training and touring, probably don't need aging. For
    one thing, it is becoming more and more common for these to be made of nylon, which does not harden
    with time[nylon stretches when cold, shrinks when warm] ON THE OTHER HAND, the low cost rubber
    tubulars are machine made and the tread is vulcanized onto the casing. The heat used in this process
    also serves to harden the rubber, making the tires about as puncture resistant as they would be
    hanging larch hung two years. It won't hurt to age them(the writer's style is terrific and the '84
    deserves a read), however, and if you are able to get a deal(pssst) by buying in quantity you should
    go ahead and treat them like expensive silks. IF they came in a bundle, break it apart so there is
    no danger the tires will come stuck together as the months go by.

    [This is enough to get you into hiking!]

    I remember an instance a few seasons ago when a team of riders from florida competed for a month in
    the northeast. Among the equipment their sponsor provided was a batch of top quality silk racing
    tires with the cocksure model name"INVULNERABLE". They were anything but. Having just arrived from
    the European factory, the tires sounded like popcorn in races that took the riders over any road
    strewn with gravel[and therein lies a tail?]
    ************************************************************************
    Hoe hoe hoe! AN EXCERPT FROM; THE COMPLETE BOOK OF COMPETITIVE AND LONG DISTANCE CYCLING by Pavelka
    and Doughty, Simon and Schuster, l983 edition
     
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  2. g.daniels <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Hoe hoe hoe! AN EXCERPT FROM; THE COMPLETE BOOK OF COMPETITIVE AND LONG DISTANCE CYCLING by
    : Pavelka and Doughty, Simon and Schuster, l983 edition

    that was genius mr. daniels. bravo!
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >Another rider's pedal touching a tire sidewall is enough to cause an explosion. Carelessly laying a
    >wheel on any angular object can can burst a tire because only breaking a few of exposed cords is
    >enough to start a burst. For this reason track tires are best deflated to less than half their
    >running pressure when not in use. I can recall vividly the sound of a tire exploding in an indoor
    >track although I heard it only a few times years ago. It is not something you would like to have
    >happen in your car or room.

    At one shop I worked at there was a long-standing policy that anyone who blew a tire off for any
    reason had to buy a 6-pack at the end of the day. That's because it is often caused by a badly
    mounted tire and the use of an air compressor. It can definitely make a whole room full of people
    check their shorts. The worst is if you blow it while the wheel is leaned up against your leg or
    something. I have seen it happen when someone was pumping up a tire with the wheel held between
    their legs... bad.

    --Paul
     
  4. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    reading Pavelka's book was entertaining and educational, constructive! and the tire situation... how
    did anyone arrive at the finish? definitely reductive. heehee haw
     
  5. Phil Holman

    Phil Holman Guest

    "David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 23 Dec 2002 22:37:05 -0500, A Muzi wrote:
    >
    > > I had to visit dictionary.com to find out what "larch" meant.
    What a
    > > crock of shit that is! Like hanging something on one kind of
    wood rail
    > > is different from hanging it on a plastic hanger? Or maybe
    the larch
    > > needs to be cut by a virgin in moonlight for best tubular
    wear? How
    > > would you find a larch tree anyway?
    >
    > Maybe look for the virgins on moolit nights?

    No, it has to be the branches from a taxol-dripping yew tree in first growth forests using golden
    saws wielded by dwarf Albanian virgins (less moustaches and facial warts) wearing mithril panties
    during the vernal equinox in dense fog.

    The original thread sounds like a precursor to posting NOS tires onto rbm.

    Phil Holman
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

  7. On Fri, 27 Dec 2002 10:33:18 -0500, g.daniels wrote:

    > an additional question was did anyone decide to run more durable tires than the 'silks' and did
    > the heavier carcass reduce speeds or increase finishing probability?

    No one ever thought that other casings were "more durable" than silk. They were simply cheaper.
    Now, as far as I know no one makes a silk tire any more, but not because it is less durable. Back
    in the early '70s I would pay $25-$30 for a good silk tire. You'd probably have to add a zero, at
    least, now.

    > the newton people previously formulated centripital rotating mass as more or less inconsequential
    >visavee colorado cyclists' eyepopping wheel/gram $ photo layout while here we see people once
    >riding on delicate/dnf prone tires to take off a few grams. amazing! but reasonable? or was this
    >something "everyone else does it"

    Though I cannot figure out what you are trying to say there, certainly the use of silk tires was not
    to shave a few grams. Silk is much stronger as a casing material than anything else out there. Silk
    tires were very, very sturdy per gram.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It is a scientifically proven fact that a mid life crisis can _`\(,_ | only be cured by
    something racy and Italian. Bianchis and (_)/ (_) | Colnagos are a lot cheaper than Maserattis
    and Ferraris. -- Glenn Davies
     
  8. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    G? Daniels writes:

    > An additional question was did anyone decide to run more durable tires than the 'silks' and did
    > the heavier carcass reduce speeds or increase finishing probability?

    This is not conjecture. Silk is stronger than cotton, the alternative fiber, and latex, the
    elastomer with the least hysteretic losses adheres well to both of these natural fibers (in contrast
    to Nylon or Rayon). With greater tensile strength finer silk threads can be used (higher TPI) to
    make thinner two ply casings. Thinner casings have less flexural losses than a thicker casing, that
    is they flex more easily as we know from experience with materials.

    Failures among tires are almost exclusively from punctures with sharp objects. This has nothing to
    do with thin casings but primarily with thin treads. Therefore, laying the blame on silk tires is
    misplaced.

    > The newton people previously formulated centripital rotating mass as more or less inconsequential
    > visavee Colorado cyclists' eye-popping wheel/gram $ photo layout while here we see people once
    > riding on delicate/DNF prone tires to take off a few grams. Amazing! but reasonable? Or was this
    > something "everyone else does it"

    What is "formulated centripital rotating mass" and what does it have to do with tire durability? Had
    you ridden in the days of tubulars, I believe you would not make such claims. Most alpine passes
    were unpaved and flats were less common than today for lack of bottles thrown from cars. You must be
    vis-a-vis kidding.

    Jobst Brandt <[email protected]> Palo Alto CA
     
  9. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    GREAT MOTHRA!

    and no newtonians. did they formulate centripitally over into another vector of cyberspace seeking
    the great whale? an interesting image, Abbott and Costello roaming cyberspace wielding electonic
    harpoons filled with ideologic.

    reading "old stuff", riding an "old steel 14 speed", thought I'd reprint pavelka's prekevlarian and
    very darwinian as in "racer's edge"-"unfair advantage" aging rubber in the cellar piece for the
    recently borne and probably totally ignorant of that gestational period for synthetics and chips
    alike. great royalite! "say watch those rocks etienne"!

    anyway,JB, the newtonians postulated no unfair advantage(making people in CO physically ill) with
    less rim weight ect. on their way down the stairs probably for another jug of claret for the
    raelians who are busy in the kitchen with ah

    MOTHRA! more rods kim! now how many tuned in seeking more tire grip?
     
  10. Mike Elliott

    Mike Elliott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] writes
    compellingly...
    > GREAT MOTHRA!
    >
    > and no newtonians. did they formulate centripitally over into another vector of cyberspace seeking
    > the great whale? an interesting image, Abbott and Costello roaming cyberspace wielding electonic
    > harpoons filled with ideologic.
    >
    > reading "old stuff", riding an "old steel 14 speed", thought I'd reprint pavelka's prekevlarian
    > and very darwinian as in "racer's edge"-"unfair advantage" aging rubber in the cellar piece for
    > the recently borne and probably totally ignorant of that gestational period for synthetics and
    > chips alike. great royalite! "say watch those rocks etienne"!
    >
    > anyway,JB, the newtonians postulated no unfair advantage(making people in CO physically ill) with
    > less rim weight ect. on their way down the stairs probably for another jug of claret for the
    > raelians who are busy in the kitchen with ah
    >
    > MOTHRA! more rods kim! now how many tuned in seeking more tire grip?

    Aw, darn -- I was gonna say that.

    MikeE
     
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