For those who remove front wheel for transport...?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by C&CO, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. C&CO

    C&CO New Member

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    Does removing the front wheel and then putting the fork on a bike mount (for transport), then back on with the wheel... then back on the fork... and on and on and on... ever do any damage to the fork where the wheel attaches?

    Seems after a few hundred rounds of this action, and the fork could wear out or something?
     
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  2. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    Some part of your bike is bound to eventually wear out. I'm betting something else is going to shoot craps before my front dropouts.
     
  3. friedmikey

    friedmikey New Member

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    I wouldn't worry about it, at all. Matter of fact, I file down the "Lawyer Lips" on my fork dropouts, just to make my life easier. They're not going to wear out.
     
  4. rudycyclist

    rudycyclist New Member

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    Actually a question I have related to this same topic is; Will removing the front wheel for transportation move the brake pads? Lately I got a fork holder for my pickup truck and it seems that about once a month I'll put my front wheel on after transporting it and one of my pads rubs. I've heard that you need to make sure your wheel is "straight". How do you keep your wheel straight? Shouldn't it just fit right into place when you put your wheel in the fork?
     
  5. 2 old 2 go slow

    2 old 2 go slow New Member

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    Either you have installed the wheel with the axle not fully in the dropouts or, more likely, the caliper has rotated on its mounting bolt.

    If it's the former then remount the wheel. If the latter then simply engaging the front brake via the lever will recenter the caliper.
     
  6. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    Since ur a campy user, the levers feature a stop pin that u can push outwards whenever you remove a wheel to clear the tire from the calipers. Shimano offers the same but u do it from the calipers to open them up. Anyways, whenever I remove and remount a wheel I always make sure I dont hit the calipers. This ways the calipers always stay centered.

    In any case, if you find a caliper not centered you can always adjust it by hand. Just make sure both pads hit the rims simultaneously when you press the levers.
     
  7. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    There is a post on this Forum by a guy who forgot his bike was on the roof and drove into his underground garage, opps mum, no more bike. :eek:
     
  8. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    It was a calfee but there's a good ending to that story. The person got it repaired from the factory under warranty.
     
  9. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

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    Me too – I hate those things and alwasy file them off! What's the point having a quick release if you then have to unscrew the damn thing to get it out?
     
  10. 2 old 2 go slow

    2 old 2 go slow New Member

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    I think that eventually happens to all who purchase a roof rack. It may not be their garage or even their own bike, and they may not even be driving at the time.
     
  11. cheapie

    cheapie New Member

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    :p yup. did that myself. sucked!
     
  12. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    When you replace the front wheel back onto your bike, don't turn the bike upside down. Drop the fork onto the wheel with both bike wheels on the ground. The weight of the bike will seat the axle in the dropouts.
     
  13. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    you must have some feather light wheels.

    I routinely turn my bike upside down to insert the front wheel, no issues with the wheel not seated properly.
     
  14. Balderick

    Balderick New Member

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    Most bikes will weigh more than their front wheels, and the greater mass assists in ensuring the wheel is properly seated on the axle. If it is not properly seated the theory, as I have been told, is the weight is supported by the QR, not on the axle (where it should). Just because you have not had issues in the past does not mean you will not in the future - ongoing added strain on the QR may lead to that QR failing in the future.
     
  15. C&CO

    C&CO New Member

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    Thank you for all the replies... this place is great for a beginner like me. I was worried at first about damage to the dropouts, but it looks like they are of a strong enough metal to take abuse. The frame is of aluminum, surely the front forks (and dropouts) are not?
     
  16. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    Actually, a problem that I've encountered quite frequently is that the wheel will be crooked in the dropouts and the brake will rub on one side. I was at the start of a group ride once in which a fellow had actually removed a spoke wrench from his tool bag and was preparing to do an impromptu wheel true and redish job. I suggested loosening and retightening the QR with the bike resting on it's wheels and solved the problem.
     
  17. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    No I will not have problems in future, because prior to riding, I check the bike over. A tell-tale sign of the wheel not properly mounted is as grouch mentioned, the wheel will appear not to be true between the forks. My point is that even with mounting the wheels right side up, you could mount them crooked as well.

    Loosen your quick release, lean the bike slightly to one side, and tighten the QR again. Thats going to give you an improperly mounted front wheel.

    That has been my experience, and in the cases where I have had to mount the front wheel upright, I lifted up the front of the bike at the hub, to ensure that its sqaurely fitted into the dropouts before tightening and closing the QR lever.
     
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