Halogen Light and generator

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by E & V Willson, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. I want to replace the conventional incandescent bulb in my headlamp with a Halogen or Krypton one to
    get better illumination. The generator is 6 volt, 3 watt, and I would replace the bulb with the same
    voltage/wattage. Current bulb is 2.4 watt 6 volt screw base. Is there any electrical reason why this
    cannot be done? Has anyone out there done this? What physical changes are necessary (i.e. different
    bulb base etc.) Any info would be appreciated.
     
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  2. Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    > More to the point, I seriously question any benefits halogen or Xenon or Krypton or Li-Ion bulbs
    > have over incandescents.

    Well, halogen, xenon, etc. are all incandescents. But I understand what you mean.

    > I admit they're a little brighter, but does one really get what one pays for?
    >
    > Sure, they might be a little brighter, but if they're "fussier" WRT handling. And if one has to
    > replace a burnt-out bulb in darkness, with fumbling, blind fingers ...

    My experience with them has been extremely good. The increase in brightness is significant, when
    going from vacuum bulbs to halogen. The life has been excellent: years of night riding per bulb. The
    fussy handling hasn't been an issue.

    Once I did get my bare fingers on the bulb, which is supposed to kill bulb life (skin oil burns and
    overheats the bulb envelope) but I just cleaned it off with acetone, and it's been fine. Otherwise,
    paper towel bits are all I've needed to install bulbs.

    I usually use back-to-back zeners to control voltage - but not on all bikes.

    My only problems have been these: a) once I tried putting halogen bulbs into a couple small battery
    lamps that weren't designed for them. The hotter halogens began to melt the reflector bases. I added
    silicon rubber shims as thermal insulation to fix that. b) Once I had a headlight go out
    intermittently, which was tough to diagnose. Turns out the bulb had been in use so long that road
    vibration ate into the soft center contact in its base. I added a drop of solder to build it up and
    continued using the bulb.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 22 Dec 2002 11:35:46 -0500, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    [snip usual sound advice from Frank]

    To be fair, though, a basic Busch & Muller Lumotec front light should be under $20, will fit the
    widely available Philips 6V 3W lamp, and has built-in Zeners, so it's probably not worth expending
    too much energy on an old lamp unless you particularly like the style.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
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    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
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  4. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Thu, 26 Dec 2002 12:49:21 -0800, [email protected]_SPAM.vcn.bc.ca (Tom Keats) wrote:

    >I've long nursed a prejudice against LEDs, but I understand improvements have lately been made with
    >them. Y'know how the old LEDs just meekly sit there and wanly glow.

    Has that ever changed! Of the battery-powered rear lights commonly available in the UK right now,
    the brightest by far is the Cateye PR-AU100, of which I have two on the back of my bent in addition
    to the B&M 4D Toplight. When I change the rechargeable lights to a SON (now on order) I'll be
    replacing the B&M with a dynamo-compatible one, and keeping the two Cateyes. I fully understand that
    this is massive overkill, but WTF - it's my money :)

    I do recommend the B&M D-Toplight, it is a very good light, visible from 180º (the 4D Toplight which
    requires more power is visible more like 270º), it's the full width of the rack and also includes a
    reflector. www.bumm.de in case you're interested. Not the cheapest thing you can buy, but very
    popular with audax riders (my litmus test for a good light).

    Testng rear lights for visibility at various distances is a worthwhile project. I must see how I can
    do some of that - anny photographers out there who can give me some indication of how to set about
    it, I'd be grateful. I am happy to provide the film and the time :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
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